Planet History

Graduiertenkolleg 1876

A report of the 2nd Meeting of the Research Network “Food in Anatolia and its Neighbouring Regions”, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Istanbul, November 03-04, 2017

A weblog entry by Sina Lehnig.Once again, our research network „Food in Anatolia and its Neighbouring Regions“ came together at the beautiful location of the Istanbul Department of the DAI (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut). Right behind the building…

Under the Mediterranean. The Honor Frost Foundation Conference on Mediterranean Maritime Archaeology to commemorate the Anniversary of the Centenary of Honor Frost’s birth on the Island of Cyprus (28 October 1917). 20-23 October 2017, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Blog entry by Mari Yamasaki. The Lady of the Sea and the Honor Frost FoundationOf an English family, Honor Frost was born in Nicosia, Cyprus, in October 1917. She was a pioneer in the field of underwater and maritime archaeology. She was one of th…

Report on the 19th Fish Remains Working Group meeting in Alghero-Stintino, Italy.

A blog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

The beautiful cities of Alghero (Fig. 1) and Stintino (Fig. 2) in Sardinia served as the backdrop for the 19th Fish Remains Working Group (also FRWG) meeting from the 1st to the 7th of October. In the course of three intense days of conference, 16 posters and 47 papers – including my own – were presented, with topics spanning from isotopic analysis and DNA sequencing, to ethnographical accounts and archaeological excavation, all sharing one common denominator: the importance of fish remains for understanding the past ways of life.
Figure 1. View of Alghero, Torre Sulis (Photo by Mari Yamasaki)



Figure 2. View of Stintino, Porto Minore (Photo by Mari Yamasaki)

With few exceptions, the study of fish remains is regarded as a minor component when building the larger historical narratives of a site, city or region. The aim of this group of international scholars is precisely to give the right weight to this often neglected piece of evidence. The majority of the participants came from archaeozoological background, but ethnologists, historians and more traditional archaeologists also attended and presented their perspectives on the subject, which often instigated lively and interdisciplinary discussions (Fig.3).



Figure 3.  (Photos by Mari Yamasaki)

a. Opening remarks. From the left: Prof. Piero Bartoloni, Prof. Arturo Morales-Muñiz, Prof. Barbara Wilkens, Dr. Ornella Piras, Dr. Gabriele Carenti

b. Prof. Morales-Muñiz. „The European hake (Merluccius merluccius L.): a deepwater fishery in the Neolithic?“
c. Prof. Richard C. Hoffman. „Who dined extensively on fish in Medieval Europe? A critical consumer reads stable isotope analysis“
Among many brilliant contributions, I believe it is worth highlighting some of them for the originality of their approach. From session 1, Ambra Zambernardi’s ethnological account on the relationship between the tonnarotti and their prey, the bluefin tuna, was particularly interesting. With the term tonnarotti, in fact, one does not refer to fishermen just as much as the term Tonno (tuna) does not refer to fish, or the tonnara to fishing. The connection between the tuna, the tonnarotti, and the tonnara is a unique one, something that resembles more the hunt of big game, or even war, than fishing. Traces of parallels between the capture of the Bluefin tuna and battle scenes can be dated back to classical Greece: in Aeschylus‘ tragedy „The Persians“, the slaughtering of the enemies is described as the mattanza, the killing phase of the capture of this giant fish. In Zambernardi’s account on the tonnarotti, the deep sense of respect that these men had for their catch was evident. This is also attested by the prayers of atonement recited for the dead tunas after the mattanza. Another aspect that emerged is that, sadly, this traditional practice and the cultural world related to it are rapidly getting lost with the introduction of industrialized fishing strategies.
Taking a leap in the deep past, Ying Zhang’s paper in session 2 focused on the Neolithic on the Yangtze River ecosystem and on the state of archaeozoological research in the area with particular reference to the ichthyofaunae. Despite a traditional image of populations dedicated mostly to terrestrial sources, from her studies emerged a picture of communities which consistently relied on fresh water resources. Interestingly, even where marine and brackish fish was available in the estuarine areas, the preference was still leaning towards the riverine sources, with a minimal incidence of marine fauna. As for the latter, the species represented consisted prevalently of large pelagic species such as tuna, shark and whale. Her hypothesis is that these few remains did not indicate the existence of a deep-water fishing strategy, but resulted from the opportunistic exploitation of specimens that were washed ashore by the tide.
In session 3, Arturo Morales Muñiz – one of the top experts in the field of archaeological fish remains for the European Atlantic coast and the western Mediterranean – also addressed the question of the existence of Neolithic deep-water fisheries. Analysis of modern hake from the Mediterranean and from the Atlantic reveal different trophic levels, which in turn allows to differentiate the origin of the fish on the basis of their isotopic signature. The isotopic analysis of archaeological fish remains from the Iberian Peninsula were then compared to the modern ones to confirm that populations in Galician coast would indeed procure their hake from the Atlantic. From this data, it almost appeared that pelagic fishing was commonly practiced already in the Neolithic. However, studying the reproductive behaviour of the hake, it resulted that this species comes close to the shore in relatively shallow waters in spring and autumn. In light of this, it becomes clear how this activity was connoted by a seasonal character, rather than advanced oceanic seafaring technology. 
Another famous name in the study of archaeological fish remains participated in the conference: Omri Lernau – arguably the authority in the field for the Eastern Mediterranean – offered a paper within the forth session. In his talk, he presented the archaeological evidence relative to the consumption of non-kosher fish (simply put, the prohibition to eat any fish without scales) in Israel, for a period spanning between the Bronze Age and the Late Roman times. In his overview of the evidence, he showed how this dietary taboo underwent variable degrees of implementation throughout Jewish history, and only consolidated, together with Israelite identity, in times of crisis – namely under the Babylonian and the Roman domination. Among the non-kosher fish, particularly numerous all over the country were the remains of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus), a riverine fish that may have lived in the much wetter Bronze and Iron Age Israel. Recent investigation, however, point towards the likelihood that this species was actually imported from Egypt together with another Nilotic fish, the Lates niloticus. As it is a matter of special interest for my dissertation project, I addressed the issue of the imports of the Lates in my own paper in relation to the exploitation of maritime resources and the development of seaborne trade networks in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age, The import of determined fish species from great distances is also accounted for in Medieval Serbia. In her paper, Ivana Živaljević presented the case study of the monastery of Studenica, where large sturgeons were carried via land for well over 200 km. 
On the last day, the conference moved to the fishing village of Stintino, some 40 km north of Alghero, where we were hosted by the Museo della Tonnara (the Museum of the traditional Bluefin tuna fishing). After welcome talks by Antonio Diana, major of Stintino, and Salvatore Rubino, scientific director of the museum and professor of microbiology atthe University of Sassari, we were given some time to visit this small but charming museum displaying the archaeology, technology and personal histories of the all but lost art of the tonnara (Fig. 4), the traditional fishing of the Bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus). 
Figure 4. A model representing the net arrangements for the tonnara. on display at the Museo della Tonnara, Stintino. (Photo by Mari Yamasaki)

Following the visit, the last session of the 19th FRWG was held in the conference hall of the museum itself. Here, Richard Hoffmann’s paper addressed a very relevant matter concerning the appropriate use of scientific data to answer historical questions. In particular, he made use of stable isotope analysis performed on individuals from a mass grave dated to 15th century Rome, and compared it with the written sources from the same period referring to the fish sold in the city markets. Taken alone, the two studies depicted two rather different scenarios: on the one hand, the isotopic analysis appeared to be consistent with a diet based on Atlantic fish, and thus implied that the Roman marked imported it; on the other, the sources made no mention of such type of fish being sold in Rome at the time. However, after combining these two types of evidence with population and economic data, there emerged a much more intricate picture, where consumption habits intertwine with an increase of trade between Rome and different areas of Europe and, consequently, a more intense movement of people along with their goods and foods (including Atlantic stockfish, for example) into the Italian peninsula. Far from suggesting the import of exotic fish, the most likely explanation was that the analysed individual was probably a foreigner, possibly a trader, who died in Rome during the plague.
In conclusion, the 19th FRWG meeting was a great occasion to highlight the importance of fish remains to understand more than just economic practices, but also gain precious information on the expression of identities and ethnicity through consumption habits. Finally yet importantly, it offered the chance to compare some radically different methods and approaches from a variety of disciplines in two of the most beautiful corners of Italy.

 

Das Tier im Text und im Buch – Arbeit mit mittelalterlichen Originalcodizes beim 6. Alfried-Krupp-Sommerkurs für Handschriftenkultur an der Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig vom 17.09. bis 23.09.2017

Ein Beitrag von Sandra Hofert.
 
Jeder Codex ist ein unikales historisches Objekt und gibt Auskunft über den zeitgenössischen Umgang mit den verschiedenen Texten. Daher ist bei der Beschäftigung mit mittelalterlichen Texten die Arbeit an den Originalquellen ein zentraler Bestandteil, denn viele Informationen lassen sich nur durch eine Handschriftenautopsie gewinnen (vgl. Abb. 1).

 
Abb. 1: Mittelalterliche Codizes ganz nah.
 
So ist auch die Arbeit mit mittelalterlichen Handschriften ein wichtiger Bestandteil meines Promotionsprojekts und ich habe mich sehr gefreut, dass ich die Gelegenheit bekommen habe, meine Kompetenzen in diesem Bereich weiter auszubauen, und Mitte September 2017 am 6. Alfried-Krupp-Sommerkurs für Handschriftenkultur an der Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig teilnehmen konnte. Gefördert durch die Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach-Stiftung sowie durch den Mediävistenverband e.V. bekamen 21 Stipendiatinnen und Stipendiaten aus ganz unterschiedlichen Fachrichtungen die Gelegenheit, miteinander ins Gespräch zu kommen und mit-, aber natürlich auch voneinander zu lernen.
 
Der Kurs war interdisziplinär ausgerichtet: Aus der ganzen Welt kamen Nachwuchswissenschaftlerinnen und -wissenschaftler verschiedener Fachbereiche wie Philosophie und Philologie, aber auch Geschichts-, Kunst- und Kulturwissenschaft zusammen, um sich mit mittelalterlichen Handschriften als Objekten zu beschäftigen.
 
Das Kursprogramm war äußerst vielfältig: An den Vormittagen hielten etablierte Experten verschiedener Bereiche zahlreiche Überblicksvorlesungen zu ganz unterschiedlichen Themen der Handschriftenkunde: So führten beispielsweise Prof. Dr. David Ganz (Cambridge) und Dr. Christine Glaßner (Wien) in die Paläographie ein, das Team des Leipziger Handschriftenzentrums stellte die Grundlagen der Kodikologie vor, PD Dr. Wolfgang Beck (Jena) gab einen Einstieg in die Schreibsprachenbestimmung und Prof. Dr. Martina Backes (Freiburg), Dr. Falk Eisermann (Berlin) und Dr. Christoph Mackert (Leipzig) führten in das Thema Büchersammlungen und Bibliotheken ein.
 
Prof. Dr. Kathrin Müller (Berlin) gab anhand verschiedener Beispiele von Beatus-Vir-Psaltern einen Einblick in die Vielfältigkeit des Buchschmucks. So zeigte sie beispielsweise die große Schmuckinitiale, die am Beginn des Beatus vir im Psalter von St. Albans aus dem frühen 12. Jahrhundert zu finden ist (Albani Psalter, Hildesheim, St. Godehard, Cod. 1, S. 72). Das große B, das mehr als ein Drittel der Seite einnimmt, zeigt eine gängige Komposition: Die Initiale wird von König David „bewohnt“, der ein Buch und eine Harfe in Händen hält, während ihm ein großer Vogel als Symbol für die göttliche Inspiration die Psalmen direkt ins Ohr eingibt (s. Abb. 2).
 
 
Abb. 2: Der Vogel der göttlichen Inspiration.
Nach den jeweiligen Vorträgen gab es Gelegenheit für Fragen und Diskussionen, wobei sich hier besonders die verschiedenen fachlichen Hintergründe der Kursteilnehmerinnen und -teilnehmer als fruchtbar erwiesen haben und es zu lebendigen Diskussionen kam.
 
Am Mittwoch gab es darüber hinaus noch einen ganz besonderen Abendvortrag, bei dem Dr. Agnieszka Budzinska-Bennett (Basel) nicht nur einen Einblick in die Entstehung und Entwicklung der Notenschrift gab, sondern auch verschiedene Beispiele früher Notation mit musikalischem Leben erfüllt hat, indem sie zusammen mit einer Kollegin die mittelalterliche Notenschrift gesanglich interpretierte (s. Abb. 3).
 



Abb. 3: Musiknotation wird zum Leben erweckt.
 
Außer am Donnerstag, wo eine Exkursion zur Domstiftsbibliothek in Merseburg stattfand und dort u. a. die Merseburger Zaubersprüche bewundert werden konnten, waren die Nachmittage dazu da, sich in kleinen Gruppen intensiv mit je einer Handschrift zu beschäftigen. Dabei wurden dem Kurs verschiedene Handschriften und Fragmente aus dem Bestand der Leipziger Universitätsbibliothek zur Verfügung gestellt, meist lateinische medizinische und/oder philosophische Sammelhandschriften aus dem 13. bis 15. Jahrhundert.
 
Abb. 4: Beispiel: Leipzig, UB, Ms. 1150 1r.
 
Am Ende der Woche konnten schließlich alle Gruppen ihre jeweiligen Ergebnisse vorstellen und im Plenum über ihre Arbeit diskutieren.
 
Es war eine Woche, in der den Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmern nicht nur ein vertiefender Einblick in zahlreiche kodikologische Fragestellungen gegeben, sondern v. a. die Arbeit an einem sehr breiten Bestand von Originalobjekten ermöglicht wurde. Ob Pergamentseiten oder Seiten aus Papier, ob ein Wasserzeichen in Form eines Ochsenkopfes oder eines Einhorns, ob ein einfacher Holzeinband oder ein Bezug aus Schweinsleder – eine mittelalterliche Handschrift ist ein unikales historisches Objekt, bei dem Medialität und Inhalt ineinander übergehen. Das konnten die Nachwuchswissenschaftlerinnen und -wissenschaftler in dieser Woche hautnah erleben.
 

Origins.6: International Conference on Predynastic and Early Dynastic Egypt, Wien 10.09.-15.09.2017

Ein Beitrag von Sonja Speck.
 
Seit die Origins-Konferenz 2002 in Krakau aus der Taufe gehoben wurde, führt sie in dreijährigem Turnus verdiente Ägyptologen, Nachwuchswissenschaftler und interessierte Studenten, die sich der Erforschung der prä- und frühdynastischen Periode des Alten Ägyptens verschrieben haben, zusammen, um aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse und Grabungsberichte vorzustellen und Probleme, Fragen und Desiderate in der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit zum frühen Ägypten zu identifizieren und zu diskutieren. Vom 10. bis 15. September dieses Jahres fand die sechste Origins statt, dieses Mal im bereits herbstlichen Wien.
Zum Auftakt luden unsere Gastgeber vom Ägyptologischen Institut Wien zum abendlichen Keynote-Vortrag von Prof. Christiana Köhler und anschließenden Empfang mit veganen Häppchen, die entsprechend dem ökologischen Food-Trend der österreichischen Hauptstadt ganz umweltbewusst per Fahrrad angeliefert wurden. Christiana Köhler nutzte ihre Keynote für einen Rückblick auf 20 Jahre der Ausgrabung und Erforschung der prä- und frühdynastischen Nekropole Helwan. Das in Wien beheimatete Helwan-Project befindet sich aktuell in der Nachbearbeitungsphase und wird in etwa einem Jahr abgeschlossen werden. Seit dem Beginn des Projekts konnten neue Erkenntnisse zum soziokulturellen Hintergrund der in Helwan bestatteten Bevölkerung der damaligen Hauptstadt Memphis und zur Entwicklung von Bestattungssitten, Ritualen in der Nekropole und den damaligen Lebensbedingungen gewonnen werden. Außerdem sind noch mehrere abschließende Publikationen im kommenden Jahr zu erwarten. Ein guter Grund für Christiana Köhler, um sowohl mit Stolz als auch mit etwas Wehmut zurückzublicken.

Folgerichtig war auch der Vormittag des zweiten Konferenztages ganz der Nekropole von Helwan gewidmet. Die Vorträge behandelten die einzelnen Fundkategorien und Themenbereiche, die im Helwan-Project vertreten sind: Die anthropologische Untersuchung der menschlichen Skelette, die Bearbeitung und Analyse von Keramik, Kleinfunden/Steingefäßen und den Überresten von Flora und Fauna. Den Abschluss bildete eine zusammenfassende Betrachtung. Allen Vorträgen war der Teilfokus auf die Identifikation und, soweit möglich, Rekonstruktion von Ritualen, die in verschiedenen Bereichen des Grabes durchgeführt wurden, gemeinsam. Eine ebenfalls von allen Rednern angesprochene Besonderheit der Nekropole von Helwan ist die hohe Variabilität, die sich in fast allen Bereichen feststellen lässt. Eine Standardisierung von Grab, Bestattung und Totenkult gab es in Helwan in keiner Weise.

Im Mittelpunkt der Vorträge des dritten Tages standen verschiedenste Bildwerke, ihre Beziehung zur Realität sowie Bedeutung und Entwicklung. Insbesondere der Kontext der Bildwerke ist entscheidend, um die Fragen, die wir an sie stellen zu beantworten oder einer Antwort nahe zu kommen. Von Interesse waren etwa die beiden Fragen: Was ist die Bedeutung der Bilderwerke innerhalb ihres Umfelds? Und: Welche Bedeutung erhalten Orte aufgrund der mit ihnen assoziierten Bilder? Unter anderem zeigte dies der Vortrag von Dr. Liam McNamara, der aufwendig restaurierte Fragmente von anthropomorphen Elfenbeinstatuetten aus dem berühmten Main Deposit von Hierakonpolis präsentierte und die gesamte Gruppe entgegen der bisherigen Forschungsmeinung, sie wäre Teil des Kultinventars des Tempels von Hierakonpolis, innerhalb dessen Mauern sie vergraben waren, in Zusammenhang mit dem noch unter dem Tempel liegenden, älteren abgestuften Hügel und damit mit dem Königskult brachte.


 
Abb. 1: Poster von Sonja Speck: A Seal for the Deceased? – Early Dynastic Cylinder Seals Bearing the Offering Scene Reexamined.
 
Der vierte Konferenztag war ganz den Grabungsberichten von archäologischen Stätten im Nildelta gewidmet. Mit drei aufeinanderfolgenden Vorträgen erhielten die Ausgrabungen in Tell el-Farkha die meiste Aufmerksamkeit. Außerdem gab es Berichte aus Tell el-Iswid, Tell el-Murra, Abu Rawash und Buto. Passend zum geographischen Fokus auf das Nildelta wurden auch brennende Fragen zur Natur des Übergangs der ursprünglich vor Ort ansässigen unterägyptischen Kultur zur sich von Oberägypten her ausbreitenden Naqada-Kultur, wie er sich im archäologischen Befund zeigt, diskutiert. Den Abschluss des Konferenztages bildete die gut besuchte und lebhafte Poster Session mit 25 präsentierten Postern. Unter diesen befand sich auch mein eigenes Poster mit dem Titel A Seal for the Deceased? – Early Dynastic Cylinder Seals Bearing the Offering Scene Reexamined (s. Abb. 1). Das Poster behandelt einen Teil meiner Magisterarbeit über die Speisetischszene im frühdynastischen Ägypten. Ziel war es zu zeigen, dass die bisherige Forschungsmeinung, die Rollsiegel mit Speisetischszene seien funeräre Objekte, die allein als Grabbeigabe gefertigt wurden, durch Fundkontexte einiger Siegel in Siedlungsbereichen, Lehmabdrücke und Abnutzungsspuren an der Oberfläche der Rollsiegel widerlegt wird. Vielmehr sind die Rollsiegel mit Speisetischszene nicht von anderen Rollsiegeln zu unterscheiden und in einem administrativen Kontext anzusiedeln.

Die Vorträge des fünften Konferenztages drehten sich ganz um die archäologischen Objekte, ihre Eigenschaften und Aussagewert zur Nutzung (praktisch und rituell), Handwerksspezialisierung und gesellschaftlichen Kontext, sowie Management in Museen, Sammlungen und Depots. Den Anfang machten drei Vorträge zur prä- und frühdynastischen Keramik, gefolgt von zwei Beiträgen, die Steinwerkzeuge zum Thema hatten. Der zweite Teil des Konferenztages beschäftigte sich mit einem gemischten Spektrum von Objektgattungen, Material und dem Objektmanagement in Museen. Glänzender Abschluss des Tages und zugleich Höhepunkt der Konferenz war das gemeinsame Abendessen der Teilnehmer im gemütlichen Heurigen mit reichlichen, traditionell österreichischen Speisen.

Nach der ausgiebigen Feier fanden sich die Teilnehmer der Origins-Konferenz am folgenden Morgen zum letzten Mal zusammen, um zunächst aktuelle Forschungsfragen zur Neolithisierung Ägyptens zu diskutieren. Bisher gab es zwei konkurrierende Hypothesen, die die Diskussion dominierten: Einerseits wurde die levantinische, andererseits die afrikanische Herkunft des neolithic package angenommen. Allerdings zeigen die in den Vorträgen diskutierten Befunde, dass die Neolithisierung Ägyptens auf komplexen Prozessen beruht, die sich aus einem Zusammenwirken der levantinischen und afrikanischen Einflüsse speisen. Einfache Antworten sind damit ausgeschlossen und keiner der bisherigen Hypothesen kann der Vorzug gegeben werden. Einen letzten thematischen Block bildeten die Beiträge zu den Ausgrabungen und Surveys rund um zwei Flint-Abbaugebiete. Neben den Spuren des Rohstoffabbaus konnten jeweils auch die Hinterlassenschaften von Verarbeitungsprozessen in unterschiedlichem Ausmaß (Rohlinge bis fast fertig gearbeitete Werkzeug-Vorformen) vor Ort dokumentiert werden.



Abb. 2: Danksagungen am Ende der Origins 6 (Foto: Sonja Speck).

Um ein Fazit meiner ersten Origins-Erfahrung zu ziehen, kann ich nur sagen, dass ich mich bereits jetzt auf die Origins 7 freue, die 2020 unter der Regie von Dr. Yann Tristant in Paris stattfinden wird. Die Origins-Gemeinde hat mich mehr als freundlich aufgenommen und auch einverleibt. Auf diese Weise werden die Reihen der Origins-Teilnehmer im dreijährigen Turnus wieder und wieder durch neu hinzugestoßene, an der Frühzeit der altägyptischen Kultur interessierte Doktoranden und Studenten aufgefüllt. Auch das Scientific Committee wurde in Wien durch die Berufung von zwei neuen Mitgliedern Dr. Liam McNamara und Dr. Mariusz Jucha verjüngt und bestens für die Zukunft gerüstet. Damit bleibt nur noch Christiana Köhler und der Wiener Ägyptologie für eine erfolgreiche und inspirierende Origins 6 zu danken.

„After Sunset: Perceptions and Histories of the Night in the Graeco-Roman World“: 64. „entretiens“ der Fondation Hardt in Genf

 
Vom 21.-25. August 2017 veranstaltete die Fondation Hardt in Genf-Vandœuvres ihre 64. entretiens („Gespräche“), die in diesem Jahr dem Thema der Nacht in der griechisch-römischen Antike gewidmet waren (Programm). Unter der Leitung des Organisators der Konferenz, Angelos Chaniotis, sowie des „directeur“ der Fondation Hardt, Pierre Ducrey, kamen acht geladene Forscher zusammen: Sie fungierten jeweils als Experten für einen Bereich aus den Disziplinen der Literaturwissenschaft, Archäologie und Alten Geschichte sowie aus den verschiedenen Epochen der Antike und führten so verschiedene Blickwinkel auf das Thema Nacht zusammen.

Abb. 1: Das Hauptgebäude der Fondation Hardt (alle Fotos: M.-C. v. Lehsten).

Abb. 2: Blick auf das Gewächshaus (links) und die Orangerie, in der die Vorträge und Diskussionen stattfanden.

Neben der ausgesuchten Zusammensetzung des Kreises der aktiven Teilnehmer, die eine hohe Qualität des wissenschaftlichen Austausches garantiert, besteht die Besonderheit der entretiens der Fondation Hardt auch im räumlichen und organisatorischen Umfeld: Die eingeladenen Forscher werden fast eine Woche lang gemeinsam in dem malerischen Anwesen der Fondation (s. Abb. 1 und 2) beherbergt und beköstigt und können zudem die stiftungseigene Bibliothek (s. Abb. 3) nutzen; das Format der Konferenz bietet mit je einer Stunde Vortragszeit sowie ebenfalls einer Stunde Diskussionszeit pro Beitrag die Gelegenheit zur intensiven und tiefgreifenden Auseinandersetzung mit der Materie. Großzügige Pausen zwischen den Vorträgen ermöglichen zudem einen ausführlichen persönlichen Austausch der Wissenschaftler und Gasthörer.

Abb.3: Impression aus der Bibliothek der Fondation Hardt.
Einer der Ausgangspunkte der Betrachtungen zur Nacht war ihr Verständnis als sog. marked time – als eine Zeit, die mit einer bestimmten Bedeutung aufgeladen ist und deren Nennung daher immer zugleich ein bestimmtes Set an Vorstellungen evoziert. Als Schlüsselwort für eine grundlegende Funktion der Nacht, deren Auswirkungen sich in literarischen Darstellungen ebenso wie in der historischen Lebenswelt widerspiegeln, fiel dabei bspw. häufig der Begriff enhancer of emotions. Vor diesem Hintergrund loteten die Forscher ganz unterschiedliche Felder aus, in denen Nacht eine Rolle spielt.

Vornehmlich im Bereich der Literatur bewegten sich Renate Schlesier (FU Berlin), Koen de Temmerman (Ghent University) und Sergio Casali (Università degli Studi di Roma „Tor Vergata“), die sich der Bedeutung der Nacht bei Sappho und im antiken Roman sowie der Verarbeitung der Nachthandlung von Ilias 10 (der „Dolonie“) im römischen Epos widmeten; in der Domäne der bildlichen Darstellungen erörterte Ioannis Mylonopoulos (Columbia University) das weitgehende Fehlen von Abbildungen der Nacht und die auffällige Brutalität in der Darstellung von Nachtszenen auf griechischen Vasen.
Während die vorgenannten Beiträge sich mit künstlerischen Nachtdarstellungen und daher notwendigerweise mit Nachtkonzepten beschäftigten, versuchte Angelos Chaniotis (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton) seine Analyse von ebendiesen möglichst freizumachen und zeichnete Veränderungen des realen Nachtlebens in der Zeit des Hellenismus nach. Untersuchungen zum Bereich der historischen Nachtgestaltung präsentierten auch Andrew Wilson (University of Oxford) und Leslie Dossey (Loyola University Chicago), die beide einen Schwerpunkt auf das Phänomen der Straßenbeleuchtung legten, jedoch in unterschiedlichen Zeiten und kulturellen Kontexten.
Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge (F.R.S.-FNRS – Université de Liège) und Filippo Carlà-Uhink (PH Heidelberg) bewegten sich mit ihren Vorträgen zu Kulten und Riten, die entweder mit der Nacht als Gottheit verbunden waren oder aber in der Nacht stattfanden, auf der Schnittstelle von literarischen und historischen Fragestellungen.

Im Ganzen bot die Fondation Hardt eine in allen Bereichen gelungene Konferenz in einer ausgesprochen familiären und produktiven Atmosphäre. Hervorzuheben ist auch, dass eine ausgiebige Erörterung der Thematik der Nacht in fast allen Bereichen der Antike schon lange ein Desiderat ist und die Konferenz sowie der entstehende Sammelband vermutlich (oder zumindest hoffentlich) eine größere forscherische Aktivität in diesem Bereich anstoßen werden, die auch mir mit meinem Projekt zur Nacht in der archaisch-klassischen griechischen Literatur sehr willkommen ist. Doch schon jetzt konnte ich eine Vielzahl von Anregungen mitnehmen und einen guten Überblick über die aktuellen Forschungstendenzen zum Thema erhalten. Ich danke daher der Fondation Hardt für die Organisation dieser beeindruckenden und bereichernden Konferenz, die Möglichkeit der Teilnahme als Gasthörerin und die freundliche Betreuung, sowie dem Graduiertenkolleg 1876 für die großzügige Finanzierung meines Aufenthaltes in Genf.

„After Sunset: Perceptions and Histories of the Night in the Graeco-Roman World“: 64. „entretiens“ der Fondation Hardt in Genf

 
Vom 21.-25. August 2017 veranstaltete die Fondation Hardt in Genf-Vandœuvres ihre 64. entretiens („Gespräche“), die in diesem Jahr dem Thema der Nacht in der griechisch-römischen Antike gewidmet waren (Programm). Unter der Leitung des Organisators der Konferenz, Angelos Chaniotis, sowie des „directeur“ der Fondation Hardt, Pierre Ducrey, kamen acht geladene Forscher zusammen: Sie fungierten jeweils als Experten für einen Bereich aus den Disziplinen der Literaturwissenschaft, Archäologie und Alten Geschichte sowie aus den verschiedenen Epochen der Antike und führten so verschiedene Blickwinkel auf das Thema Nacht zusammen.

Abb. 1: Das Hauptgebäude der Fondation Hardt (alle Fotos: M.-C. v. Lehsten).

Abb. 2: Blick auf das Gewächshaus (links) und die Orangerie, in der die Vorträge und Diskussionen stattfanden.

Neben der ausgesuchten Zusammensetzung des Kreises der aktiven Teilnehmer, die eine hohe Qualität des wissenschaftlichen Austausches garantiert, besteht die Besonderheit der entretiens der Fondation Hardt auch im räumlichen und organisatorischen Umfeld: Die eingeladenen Forscher werden fast eine Woche lang gemeinsam in dem malerischen Anwesen der Fondation (s. Abb. 1 und 2) beherbergt und beköstigt und können zudem die stiftungseigene Bibliothek (s. Abb. 3) nutzen; das Format der Konferenz bietet mit je einer Stunde Vortragszeit sowie ebenfalls einer Stunde Diskussionszeit pro Beitrag die Gelegenheit zur intensiven und tiefgreifenden Auseinandersetzung mit der Materie. Großzügige Pausen zwischen den Vorträgen ermöglichen zudem einen ausführlichen persönlichen Austausch der Wissenschaftler und Gasthörer.

Abb.3: Impression aus der Bibliothek der Fondation Hardt.
Einer der Ausgangspunkte der Betrachtungen zur Nacht war ihr Verständnis als sog. marked time – als eine Zeit, die mit einer bestimmten Bedeutung aufgeladen ist und deren Nennung daher immer zugleich ein bestimmtes Set an Vorstellungen evoziert. Als Schlüsselwort für eine grundlegende Funktion der Nacht, deren Auswirkungen sich in literarischen Darstellungen ebenso wie in der historischen Lebenswelt widerspiegeln, fiel dabei bspw. häufig der Begriff enhancer of emotions. Vor diesem Hintergrund loteten die Forscher ganz unterschiedliche Felder aus, in denen Nacht eine Rolle spielt.

Vornehmlich im Bereich der Literatur bewegten sich Renate Schlesier (FU Berlin), Koen de Temmerman (Ghent University) und Sergio Casali (Università degli Studi di Roma „Tor Vergata“), die sich der Bedeutung der Nacht bei Sappho und im antiken Roman sowie der Verarbeitung der Nachthandlung von Ilias 10 (der „Dolonie“) im römischen Epos widmeten; in der Domäne der bildlichen Darstellungen erörterte Ioannis Mylonopoulos (Columbia University) das weitgehende Fehlen von Abbildungen der Nacht und die auffällige Brutalität in der Darstellung von Nachtszenen auf griechischen Vasen.
Während die vorgenannten Beiträge sich mit künstlerischen Nachtdarstellungen und daher notwendigerweise mit Nachtkonzepten beschäftigten, versuchte Angelos Chaniotis (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton) seine Analyse von ebendiesen möglichst freizumachen und zeichnete Veränderungen des realen Nachtlebens in der Zeit des Hellenismus nach. Untersuchungen zum Bereich der historischen Nachtgestaltung präsentierten auch Andrew Wilson (University of Oxford) und Leslie Dossey (Loyola University Chicago), die beide einen Schwerpunkt auf das Phänomen der Straßenbeleuchtung legten, jedoch in unterschiedlichen Zeiten und kulturellen Kontexten.
Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge (F.R.S.-FNRS – Université de Liège) und Filippo Carlà-Uhink (PH Heidelberg) bewegten sich mit ihren Vorträgen zu Kulten und Riten, die entweder mit der Nacht als Gottheit verbunden waren oder aber in der Nacht stattfanden, auf der Schnittstelle von literarischen und historischen Fragestellungen.

Im Ganzen bot die Fondation Hardt eine in allen Bereichen gelungene Konferenz in einer ausgesprochen familiären und produktiven Atmosphäre. Hervorzuheben ist auch, dass eine ausgiebige Erörterung der Thematik der Nacht in fast allen Bereichen der Antike schon lange ein Desiderat ist und die Konferenz sowie der entstehende Sammelband vermutlich (oder zumindest hoffentlich) eine größere forscherische Aktivität in diesem Bereich anstoßen werden, die auch mir mit meinem Projekt zur Nacht in der archaisch-klassischen griechischen Literatur sehr willkommen ist. Doch schon jetzt konnte ich eine Vielzahl von Anregungen mitnehmen und einen guten Überblick über die aktuellen Forschungstendenzen zum Thema erhalten. Ich danke daher der Fondation Hardt für die Organisation dieser beeindruckenden und bereichernden Konferenz, die Möglichkeit der Teilnahme als Gasthörerin und die freundliche Betreuung, sowie dem Graduiertenkolleg 1876 für die großzügige Finanzierung meines Aufenthaltes in Genf.

The Kolloquium für Doktoranden und Fortgeschrittene Masterstudenten der Byzantinistik und Neogräzistik an den Universitäten Köln, Mainz und Münster On July The 19th, 2017

A weblog entry by Laura Borghetti

When it comes to academic life, the possibility of exchanging ideas, projects and experiences with colleagues from other universities, cities and countries fully compensates all various struggles that every single PhD student happens to face throughout his/her doctoral path. This very kind of experience was the Therinà Anameikta, namely the Kolloquium für Doktoranden und fortgeschrittene Masterstudenten der Byzantinistik und Neogräzistik an den Universitäten Köln, Mainz und Münster. In the lovely location of the Internationaler Kollege Morphomata in Köln on July the 19th, 2017, PhD and master students coming from the faculties of Byzantine Studies of three eminent German universities had the chance to present their either ongoing or concluded projects in the framework of a friendly academic meeting, moderated by Prof. Dr. Claudia Sode (Universität zu Köln) and in the presence of the special guest Prof. Paul Magdalino (University of St. Andrews).
 
The participants and the rest of the audience could therefore listen to, for example, the interesting presentation of Martina Filosa, master student in Köln, who was to submit her master thesis in Greek Palaeography a few day later and who, during the meeting, talked about the commentary to the folio 528 in the Psalms manuscript of the Duchess Anna Amalia’s library in Weimar („Der Psalmenkommentar in der Handschrift Fol. 528 der Herzogin Anna Amalia Bibliothek in Weimar“). On the other side, João Dias, PhD student in Mainz, had the chance to do his first presentation („Barbaren und Tyrannen in der Anemas-Verschwörung“) after successfully submitting his PhD thesis a few weeks before. As one can see, the possibility of exchanging ideas about various topics and projects perfectly matched the chance of confronting ourselves with different phases of the PhD-work and future careers. When it came to me, the Kolloquium in Köln was my first occasion to present my ongoing project and some results – which are still in their very early stage – in front of a very significant part of the German academic community. The friendliness and vivid interest that greeted my presentation, together with several positive and encouraging feedbacks I got both from professors and younger colleagues, made my experience in Köln the most cheerful way to close the first phase of my PhD work before the summer break.
 
The PhD students of the Mainzer Byzantinistik in Köln: Kai-Chieh Chang, Laura Borghetti and João Dias (Photo by Laura Borghetti) 

49. Ständige Ägyptologenkonferenz (SÄK) in Göttingen, 14.-16. Juli 2017

Ein Beitrag von Victoria Altmann-Wendling.

Vom 14. bis 16. Juli 2017 fand an der Georg-August-Universität zu Göttingen die diesjährige, 49. Ständige Ägyptologenkonferenz statt. Sie trug gemäß der Ausrichtung des dortigen Seminars für Ägyptologie und Koptologie, dessen Gründung dieses Jahr sein 150. Jubiläum feiert, den Titel „‚Steininschrift und Bibelwort‘ – Religiöse Texte aus Ägypten in ihrem kulturellen Umfeld“. Das Zitat, das aus dem Titel eines Werks Heinrich Brugschs, dem Begründer des Lehrstuhls, stammt, verweist auf das breite Spektrum der Vorträge, das neben klassisch ägyptischen Texten auch zahlreiche christliche sowie rezeptionsgeschichtliche Themen umfasste.
 
Den Anfang der im Zentralen Hörsaalgebäude stattfindenden Veranstaltung machten jedoch traditionsgemäß zahlreiche Begrüßungsredner, unter denen besonders seine Exzellenz Bischof Anba Damian, dem Diözesenbischof von Norddeutschland als Vertreter der Koptisch-Orthodoxen Kirche einen bleibenden Eindruck hinterließ. In seiner Rede plädierte er eindringlich für ein friedliches Miteinander von Christen und Muslimen, nicht nur, aber speziell in Ägypten, in dem dieses Jahr bereits mehrfach koptische Christen dem islamischen Terror zum Opfer gefallen sind. Zudem betonte er die große Bedeutung der ägyptologischen Forschung für das moderne ägyptische Volk, dessen Geschichte damit erforscht und auf eine zeitlich weit zurückreichende Basis gestellt werde, wofür er sich mit warmen Worten stellvertretend bei den anwesenden Ägyptologen bedankte.
 
Die Berichte aus den Institutionen wurden diesmal in fester Form mittels kleiner Kurzvorträge vorgestellt, was jedoch die Redezeit – bis auf einige Ausnahmen – nicht verkürzte und so ein paar Stunden in Anspruch nahm. Das tat dem anschließenden Empfang im selben Gebäude jedoch keinen Abbruch. Manche ließen den Tag später bei einem doch überraschend großen Schnitzel ausklingen (Abb. 1).
 
Abb. 1: Schnitzel in einer der gemütlichen Kneipen der Göttinger Altstadt (Foto: S. Gerhards).
 
Der Samstag begann am Vormittag mit einigen Key-Note-Sprechern, deren Themen von den Pyramidentexten (Antonio J. Morales) über hieratische religiöse Texte (Joachim F. Quack) bis hin zu christlichen und islamischen Texten reichten. Dabei standen insbesondere Fragen der Überlieferung und der Rezeption im Fokus. Morales betonte, dass der monumentalisierten Aufzeichnung der Pyramidentexte bereits eine lange Phase der oralen Überlieferung sowie der Kanonisierung auf anderen Schriftträgern (Stelen, Papyri) vorausgehe. Quack zeigte, dass nur wenige nicht-funeräre religiöse Texte aus Siedlungen bekannt sind, was jedoch auch auf Erhaltungszufällen beruhen kann und es daher schwer sei, Aussagen zur Entwicklung und Überlieferung dieser Texte und damit zu einer historischen Geistesgeschichte zu treffen.
 
Am Nachmittag begann das in zwei Sektionen aufgeteilte Programm, wobei sich ein Teil klassisch ägyptischen Texten widmete, während die zweite Sektion entweder biblische Texte oder Rezeptionsgeschichte wie etwa im Rahmen der Freimaurerei (Florian Ebeling) behandelte; ein weiterer interessanter Beitrag war der Vortrag des Ägyptologen und Wissenschaftshistorikers Thomas Gertzen, der über „Judentum und Konfession in der Geschichte der deutschsprachigen Ägyptologie“ referierte.
 
Abb. 2: Vortrag von Victoria Altmann-Wendling (Foto: S. Gerhards).
 
Für das Graduiertenkolleg ist mein eigener Vortrag zu nennen, der die „Metaphorik und Symbolik des Mondes in den religiösen Texten des griechisch-römischen Ägyptens“ behandelte (Abb. 2). Darin stellte ich einerseits die als theoretischer Hintergrund dienende Metapherntheorie vor und präsentierte andererseits ausgewählte Beispiele für die in meiner Dissertation herausgearbeiteten Konzepte vom Mond. Wie erwartet erhielt ich u.a. Rückmeldung von der Jun.-Prof. des Göttinger Instituts, Camilla Di Biase-Dyson, die sich selbst in zahlreichen Arbeiten mit dem Metaphernbegriff auseinandergesetzt hat (Fn. 1). Sie wies mich darauf hin, nicht nur die unterschiedlichen Personifikationen und Epitheta des Mondes als Metaphern aufzufassen, sondern auch in den übrigen Verbformen nach metaphorischen Ausdrücken zu suchen.
 
Bevor der Festvortrag begann, war noch ein wenig Zeit, sich die schöne kleine Stadt Göttingen anzusehen, neben Fachwerk-, aber auch Jugendstilhäusern durfte natürlich der berühmte Gänseliesel-Brunnen nicht fehlen (Abb. 3-4)!
 

Abb. 3: Jugendstiltür in Göttingen (Foto: A. Rickert).

Abb. 4: Victoria Altmann-Wendling vor dem Gänseliesel-Brunnen (Foto: A. Rickert).

 
Der Festvortrag der Historikerin Suzanne L. Marchand von der Louisiana State University, der in der Aula am Wilhelmsplatz stattfand (Abb. 5) trug den Titel „Herodot und die ägyptischen Priester: Eine Rezeptionsgeschichte“. Dabei begab sich Marchand auf eine wissenschaftshistorische Spurensuche zur Wahrnehmung und Einordnung Herodots Ägyptenbeschreibungen in der frühen Neuzeit und Moderne. Sie kam zu den Schluss, dass seine „Beobachtungen“ in Bezug auf die ägyptischen Priester als falsch abgelehnt, aber auch als richtig gefeiert wurden, je nach politischer Ausrichtung oder Aussage, die von einem Forschenden in einem bestimmten Kontext betont werden sollte. Eine generelle Ablehnung Herodots Beschreibungen konnte nicht nachgewiesen werden.
 
Abb. 5: Suzanne Marchand in der Aula der Universität Göttingen (Foto: S. Gerhards).
 
Bei Klavierklängen des Pianisten Stanislav Boianov und dem französischen Buffet konnte im Festsaal der Alten Mensa auch dieser Tag seinen gebührenden Abschluss finden.
 
Am Sonntag fanden wie üblich die Berichte aus archäologischen und anderen Forschungseinrichtungen ihren Platz. Neu war jedoch ein Vortrag der DFG, den Christoph Kümmel und Dietrich Raue bestritten, in dem sie über Ziele, Abläufe und Möglichkeiten des DFG-Fachkollegiums „Alte Kulturen“ informierten. Dabei ermunterten sie insbesondere die Wissenschaftler unter 40, einen eigenen Antrag zu wagen.
 
Abschließend wurde der Ort der nächsten SÄK bekannt gegeben: Sie findet vom 13.-15. Juli 2018 in Münster zum Thema „Kulturen in Kontakt. Altägypten und seine Nachbarn“ statt.


Fußnote:
[1] Z.B. C. Di Biase-Dyson, Metaphor, in: J. Stauder-Porchet/A. Stauder/W. Wendrich (Hrsg.), UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology, Los Angeles 2017 (https://escholarship.org/uc/item/4z62d3nn); C. Di Biase-Dyson, Wege und Abwege: zu den Metaphern in der ramessidischen Weisheitsliteratur, in: ZÄS 143, 2016, 22-33. 

Summer School in Greek Palaeography and Byzantine Epigraphy

A weblog entry by Laura Borghetti
 
Spending the first week of July on a Greek island, from whose jagged shores one can almost catch Turkish coast’s faraway profile, may sound like a dreamy vacation plan. But, if this idyllic landscape just happens to frame seven days spent by reading medieval Greek manuscripts in the labyrinthine library of a Byzantine monastery and by exploring ancient churches and historical buildings seeking out Byzantine inscriptions, well: „vacation“ is a quite humble way to define the experience of the Summer School in Greek palaeography and Byzantine epigraphy, organized by the National Hellenic Research Foundation, that took place in Patmos from the 2nd to the 8th of July [Fig. 1].
 
Figure 1: View of Patmos Island (Photo by Laura Borghetti)

Before beginning to describe my amazing experience in Patmos, I would like to spend a couple of lines about the island’s history and major institutions. Patmos is one of the northernmost islands of the Dodecanese complex, Greek archipelago situated off the coast of Asia Minor, and its main communities are Chora (the capital city) [Fig. 3], and Skala, the only commercial port. All churches and communities on Patmos typically are of the Eastern Orthodox tradition and Patmos is even mentioned in the Gospels‘ Book of Revelation. And not by chance. The book’s introduction, in fact, states that its author, John, was on Patmos when he was given (and recorded) a vision from Jesus. Early Christian tradition identified this writer as John the Apostle, though some modern scholars are uncertain, and thus call him the less specific „John of Patmos“. No matter the authenticity of this attribution, John the Apostle has become patron of the island and official foundation documents prove that Saint Christodulos, far back in 1080, established the Monastery of John the Theologian, on the top of Chora’s hill. In 1999, the island’s historic centre Chora, along with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse [Fig. 2], where – according to legend – Saint John was given his vision, were declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO.
 



Figures 2/3: The Cave of the Apocalypse and a view over the historical centre of Chora (Photos by Laura Borghetti)


In this idyllic frame, I happened to be accepted and have the chance to attend a Summer School in Greek Palaeography and Byzantine Epigraphy. The National Hellenic Research Foundation, represented in loco by Vassiliki Kollia, had chosen two special locations where the courses would be held. First and foremost, the Library of Saint John’s Monastery, and then the lovely Nicolaides Mansion, in the historical core of Chora. The Monastery Library owns an amazingly rich treasure in manuscripts: 330 manuscripts (267 on parchment) are housed here, including 82 manuscripts of the New Testament, some of them decorated with precious miniatures [Fig. 4]. The Nicolaides Mansion in Patmos town is a two-storey house built between the 17th and 18th century, considered a representative example of the architecture fostered by the island’s prosperous middle class. Particularly interesting is the single nave chapel dedicated to St. Nicholas, which was incorporated into the facade, and the lavishly decorated ambataros, a wooden structure on the upper floor which served as a partition and storage space [Fig. 5]. It has been truly exciting for us students to be taught in such beautiful historical buildings, which made the learning experience properly unforgettable.

Figures 4/5: The inside of the Monastery Library and the Chapel of the Nicolaides Mansion (Photos by Laura Borghetti)

The program of the courses was really fascinating as well. Both the Greek Palaeography classes, held by Zisis Melissakis – Senior Researcher at the Institute of Historical Research (Department of Byzantine Research) of National Hellenic Research Foundation – and the Byzantine Epigraphy ones, held by Nicholas Melvani – researcher at the Institute of Historical Research of the National Research Foundation in Athens, where he has been teaching a course in Byzantine Epigraphy since 2012 – were divided in theoretical and practical sessions. The theoretical classes successfully responded to the challenge of gathering massive information and concepts in the few days at disposal. During the Greek Palaeography classes, we dealt with majuscule and minuscule, graphic abbreviations and different styles and traits, namely the evolution of handwriting throughout the Byzantine history. Besides, Zisis Melissakis also illustrated to us all different writing supports and materials, such as papyrus, parchment and paper, codices and rolls. In the end of the Summer School, Greek Palaeography had no more secrets for us. On the other hand, Nicholas Melvani had similarly structured his classes, with a closer focus on reading epigraphs and inscriptions both on paper fac-simile and in loco, due to the lower amount different kinds of handwritings and material supports. The practical exercises, both palaeographical and epigraphical ones, took place in wonderful locations, such as the Library and the Museum of Saint John’s Monastery, the Cave of the Apocalypse – where Saint John is said to have been given his vision and have written the Apocalypse – and the tiny but stunningly beautiful Nunnery Zoodochos Pigi [Fig. 6/7]. 
 


Figures 6/7: Samples of a manuscript and an epigraphy both from the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian (Photos by Laura Borghetti)

During the „Fieldwork“ we were also provided with very interesting notions about care and conservation of both manuscripts and epigraphs. We even had the luck to meet the famous Italian palaeographist Prof. Anna Clara Cataldi Palau, who was spending a research visit in Patmos, in order to analyse the famous Gospel manuscripts of the Monastery. She showed us some samples of stunning preciously decorated manuscripts, some of which we had had the chance to indirectly admire only in books and catalogues so far [Fig. 8]. The last class day was particularly interesting due to the visit to the manuscripts restoration laboratory of the Monastery, where Alexia Melianou – Art Conservator specialized in Book Conservation in Thessaloniki – was so kind to show us some samples of ancient books before and after the treatments [Fig. 9]. Being conscious of how delicate the manuscripts are and how decisive the environmental conditions of their conservation are, is of high importance.

Figures 8/9: Prof. Cataldi Palau and Alexia Melianou talking to the students (Photos by Laura Borghetti)


To conclude, I can say that I am very happy about my experience in Patmos from several perspectives. First of all, both the instructors and our group of students managed to make the best out of the Summer School, in spite of the little time given to us combined with the high amount of notions to be learnt and practical exercises to be accomplished. Both subjects were taught so well and the teachers were so helpful, that eight hours of classes a day were never heavy, but always useful and fascinating. The international group of participants quickly found a nice connection and the time we spent together out of the classes was a lovely occasion to share projects, ideas and contacts [Fig. 10/11]. Last, but not least, the almost unbearable heat wave of the first two days was soon toned down by the Meltemi, the strong wind of the Aegean islands, that was following us through our classes, explorations of the islands and – in some cases – also through the long hours of extra PhD-work during the peaceful Greek nights.

Figures 10/11: Some of the students enjoying a coffee and a glimpse from Chora (Photos by Laura Borghetti)

 

Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Laura Borghetti: „Die Darstellung von Naturphänomenen in der byzantinischen Literatur des 9. bis 11. Jahrhundert“

Ein Beitrag von Laura Borghetti.

In der Plenumssitzung des GRKs am 13. Juli 2017 hatte ich die Gelegenheit, mein Dissertationsprojekt „Die Darstellung von Naturphänomenen in der byzantinischen Literatur des 9. bis 11. Jahrhundert“ vor dem Trägerkreis und meinen Kollegen vorzustellen. Zunächst präsentierte ich das Korpus der von mir untersuchten Quellen, die die textuelle Grundlage meiner Argumentationen bilden. Danach führte ich den Schwerpunkt meines derzeitigen Forschungsfelds aus, die Winddarstellungen in den naturwissenschaftlichen Texten der mittelbyzantinischen Zeit, und erläuterte diese anhand von Textbeispielen.

Forschungsschwerpunkt und Ziele

Mit dem Titel der Dissertation als Ausgangspunkt der Präsentation wollte ich zuerst eingehender beschreiben, worin die im Titel genannten „Darstellungen“ eigentlich bestehen und mit welchen Zielen sie analysiert werden. Primäres Ziel meines Projektes ist die Herausarbeitung der Konzepte vom Wind und anderen mit dem Wind direkt verbundenen Naturerscheinungen in der Literatur der mittelbyzantinischen Zeit. Nebenziel der Forschung ist es, zu analysieren, welche Aussagen über die Winde und andere von diesen verursachte Naturphänomene formuliert wurden; mit welchen Mitteln die Autoren ihre Anschauungen dieser Naturerscheinungen in literarische Formen umgesetzt haben; welche Funktionen den Naturphänomenen in den verschiedenen Diskursen zugeschrieben wurden; und zuletzt, welchen Einfluss das antike Wissen auf die byzantinischen Texte hatte und wie es von den byzantinischen Autoren interpretiert und adaptiert wurde.
 

Die Winde im Byzanz der makedonischen Zeit

Grundsätzliche Aspekte meines Projektes sind einerseits der Forschungsgegenstand – die Winde – und andererseits der Zeitraum – nämlich die drei Jahrhunderte der makedonischen Dynastie. Diese Phase der byzantinischen Geschichte stellt eine echte Renaissance dar; das wiedergeborene starke Interesse für das antike Erbe führt zu einer fruchtbaren literarischen und kulturellen Blüte, die auch durch die Wiederentdeckung der alten griechischen Handschriften ausgelöst wird. Byzanz – und besonders Konstantinopel – war aber nicht nur ein florierendes Kulturzentrum, sondern auch eine bedeutende Seemacht (vgl. Abb. 1). Insbesondere in den Jahrhunderten der makedonischen Dynastie wurde Byzanz im Kampf um die Vormacht im Mittelmeer mit der aufkeimenden arabischen Bedrohung konfrontiert. Selbstverständlich spielte die Kenntnis der Winde eine wesentliche Rolle für ein Reich wie Byzanz, das noch im 7. Jahrhundert sechs militärische und kommerzielle Flottenstützpunkte im westlichen Mittelmeer, dreizehn im östlichen Mittelmeer, zwei im Bosporus und zwei weitere im Schwarzen Meer hatte. Deshalb kann man in den literarischen Quellen häufige und bedeutsame Erwähnungen der Winde und eine wesentliche Präsenz des antiken Erbes beobachten. Infolgedessen stellen sich die Winde in den obengenannten Jahrhunderten als idealer Schwerpunkt meiner Forschung dar. 




Abb. 1: Zeichnung in einem spätbyzantinischen Druckband der Bibliothek des Klosters „Sankt Johann der Theologe“ in Patmos (Foto: L. Borghetti).
 

Quellenstand

Nach dieser thematischen und historischen Einleitung präsentierte ich den Quellenstand. Die Zahl der Textpassagen, die die Winde erwähnen, ist groß. An erster Stelle stehen die naturkundlichen Texte, die byzantinische Lexika, naturkundliche Traktate und Kommentare von antiken Werken miteinbeziehen. Diese sind die Quellen, die ich zurzeit untersuche. Danach werden die erzählerischen Texte betrachtet werden, die aus historiographischen und hagiographischen Werken sowie Romanen bestehen. Zuletzt werde ich mich auf die dichterischen Texte konzentrieren, die sowohl profane Dichtung als auch liturgische Hymnen einschließen. Die Grenzlinien zwischen den verschiedenen Quellengruppen sind aber recht flexibel: Aufgrund von eventuell notwendigen Textvergleichen und Verbindungen können gelegentlich auch andere Kriterien bei der Quellenuntersuchung angewendet werden. Statt der Orientierung am Kriterium des Genres kann man die Textanalyse z.B. auch nach chronologischen oder geographischen Maßstäben durchführen.
 

Methodisches Vorgehen

Wie oben schon gesagt, ist die Quellenuntersuchung der Ausgangspunkt meiner Forschung. Im Laufe dieser textuellen Analyse werden einige Funktionen der Winde unabhängig von den verschiedenen Quellengruppen ermittelt, die sich in „physikalische Eigenschaften“, „narrative Rolle“ und „symbolische Bedeutung“ der Winde aufgliedern lassen.
Im Rahmen der physikalischen Eigenschaften habe ich noch weitere Unterkategorien hervorheben können, wie z.B. die meteorologischen Eigenheiten der Winde und ihre geographische Herkunft und Richtung, sowie andere von den Winden verursachte Naturerscheinungen (Stürme, Sturmwinde, Donner usw.) und die Reaktionen des menschlichen Körpers auf die verschiedenen Winde. Zuletzt konnte ich in den Texten auch einige praktische Anwendungen der Winde bei der Schifffahrt, der Tierpflege und der Landwirtschaft ausfindig machen. Diese Funktionen der Winde werden meine Forschung dahin führen, die verschiedenen Diskurse – z.B. naturkundlich, profan, religiös – zu ermitteln und zu profilieren und die Konzepte von Winden herauszuarbeiten, die sich hinter den literarischen Erwähnungen dieser Naturphänomene verbergen.

Abb. 2: Methodisches Vorgehen (alle Grafiken von L. Borghetti).

Quellenbeispiele

Die Textbeispiele, die ich anlässlich der Plenumssitzung vorstellte, sind sehr unterschiedlich, und in diesem kurzen Beitrag werde ich nur eine zusammengefasste Auswahl von ihnen präsentieren. Zuerst bot ich eine übergreifende Darstellung der Windrose dar, beginnend mit ihrem aristotelischen Ursprung. Die Windrose (s. Abb. 3) bildet eine sehr wichtige Forschungsgrundlage und einen geographischen und meteorologischen Ausgangspunkt. Der Umstand, dass sie sich auf Aristoteles zurückführen lässt, ist von großer Bedeutung, weil Aristoteles bereits vor den Byzantinern die theoretische Grundlage des physikalischen Ursprungs der Winde erklärt hatte. Seiner Meinung nach sind die Winde keine bewegte Luft, sondern sie bestehen aus einer rauchigen Exhalation, die von der Erde ausströmt und in Richtung des Himmels sowohl senkrecht als auch waagerecht hinzieht. Die byzantinischen Autoren – wie z.B. Michael Psellos und Symeon Seth – übernehmen die Anschauung des Aristoteles vollständig und lehnen sich an die aristotelischen Texte sowohl vom konzeptuellen als auch vom lexikalischen Gesichtspunkt her an.
 

Abb. 3: Byzantinische Windrose.

Aristoteles ist aber nicht der einzige antike Autor, dessen Einfluss man in den byzantinischen Traktaten ermitteln kann. In seinem Hippocratis Aphorismos-Kommentar stellt Stephanos von Athen den Wind Boreas als kalt und trocken dar. Diese Begriffsbestimmung ist darauf ausgerichtet, weiter zu beschreiben, wie der menschliche Körper auf diesen Wind reagiert und welche Krankheiten durch ihn entstehen (s. Abb. 4). Die körperlichen Reaktionen auf diesen Wind werden im Detail dargestellt: Boreas greift den Magen an, sticht in die Augen und reizt frühere Schmerzen. Stephanos fügt aber hinzu, dass es auch positive Aspekte des kalten Klimas gibt. Zum Beispiel bekommen die Organe durch die Kälte mehr Kraft und die stärkenden Kräfte werden zusammengehalten, die Körper werden kräftiger, folgsamer, behänder und die Gesichtsfarbe gesünder. 
 
Abb. 4: Körperliche Reaktionen auf den Wind Boreas.

Fazit

Dieser starke Einfluss des antiken Erbes auf die byzantinischen Autoren kann nicht als künstlicher und mechanischer Abdruck der Vergangenheit bezeichnet werden. Ganz im Gegenteil weisen die byzantinischen Texte nicht nur eigene faszinierende Besonderheiten auf, sondern zeigen auch, dass sie über Jahrhunderte ihre Spuren bis zur gegenwärtigen türkischen Literatur eingeprägt haben. Diesbezüglich möchte ich meinen Beitrag mit dieser Strophe einer Dichtung des türkischen Poeten Ümit Yasar Oguzcan abschließen, die den Titel „Istanbul lights“ („Istanbul Isik Isik“) trägt:

istanbul rüzgar rüzgar sevdigim
kah bir lodos, denizlerden esen

ilik mi ilik

kah ustura gibi deli bir poyraz

birak saçlarini rüzgarlarina istanbulun
bu sehirde asksiz ve rüzgarsiz yasanmaz

Istanbul, the wind

The wind, my love

Sometimes lodos blows from the seas

Oh so warm

Sometimes poyraz blows like a crazed razor

Let your hair down for the winds of Istanbul

You can’t be without love or the wind in this City.

 

Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Marie-Charlotte von Lehsten: „Die Rolle der Nacht in der archaischen und klassischen griechischen Literatur“

Ein Beitrag von Mirna Kjorveziroska. 

Am 6. Juli 2017 hat Marie-Charlotte von Lehsten im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des GRKs vor dem Trägerkreis und den Kollegiatinnen und Kollegiaten einen Einblick in ihr Dissertationsprojekt „Die Rolle der Nacht in der archaischen und klassischen griechischen Literatur“ geboten und einen Prospekt präsentiert, welche Fragen, die sich in der bisherigen Arbeit herauskristallisiert haben, beantwortet werden sollen, sowie welche Deutungskonturen, die sich bei den ersten Begegnungen mit dem Thema abgezeichnet haben, durch weitere Analysen zu vollständigen interpretatorischen Gebilden auszuformen sind.

Textkorpus und lexikalische Kodierung der Nacht 

Zunächst wurden die chronologischen und gattungstypologischen Grundkoordinaten des Textkorpus präzisiert, das sich über den Zeitraum vom 8. bis zum 5. Jh. v. Chr. erstreckt und poetische Texte von Homer bis zur attischen Tragödie sowie Prosaformate wie die Texte der klassischen Historiker umfasst. Des Weiteren wurde das lexikalische Spektrum vorgestellt, mit welchen Signifikanten die Nacht im Griechischen referentialisiert werden kann. Dabei war eine Absenz von lexikalischen Varianten und konkurrierenden Synonymen festzustellen, da nur das Femininum νύξ als herkömmliche Nachtbezeichnung zur Verfügung steht. Eine seltene Alternative stellt das Lexem εὐφρόνη dar, was u.U. als ein sprachlicher Verharmlosungsversuch zu deuten ist, das Erschreckende und das Bedrohliche der Nacht durch die Verwendung eines positiven Begriffs zu neutralisieren (zu deuten etwa als ‚die Wohlwollende / fröhlich Machende‘). Eine Subdifferenzierung konnte an den Nachtabschnitten bzw. an den liminalen Phasen aufgezeigt werden, die die Nacht zäsurieren und ihre Kontaktstellen mit dem Tag markieren: Lexikalisch unterschieden wird zwischen ἕσπερος/ἑσπέρα (‚Abend‘), ὄρθρος (‚Morgengrauen‘), und ἠώς/ἕως (‚Morgenröte‘). Analysiert werden müssen allerdings auch zahlreiche Textpassagen, die lexikalisch nicht ausgezeichnet sind bzw. das Substantiv νύξ nicht explizit enthalten, sondern in denen die Nacht assoziativ aktualisiert wird, durch Erwähnung von Ereignissen oder Handlungen, die man mit der Nacht verbindet. Eine solche Assoziationsumschrift der Nacht ist beispielsweise im Epos das kollektive Schlafengehen.

Die Absenz expliziter Nachtbeschreibungen und ihre Kompensation

Ebenso wenig wie auf die Vorkommnisse des Substantivs νύξ ließe sich Marie-Charlotte von Lehstens Untersuchung auf detaillierte descriptiones der Nacht beschränken. Eine Möglichkeit, die Seltenheit expliziter Nachtbeschreibungen im Textkorpus zu plausibilisieren, sieht von Lehsten in deren routinierter Präsenz: Die Nacht als eine allgemein bekannte, in einem konstanten Rhythmus immer wieder zu beobachtende Erscheinung verfügt nicht über die Aura des Einmaligen, Exotischen und Exklusiven, sodass dieser Status einer habituellen Selbstverständlichkeit jegliche deskriptiven Aufwände blockiert. Dem diskursiven Defizit ist dadurch beizukommen, dass auch all jene narrativen Konstellationen ausgewertet werden, die als Nachthandlungen kodiert sind oder in denen die Nacht lediglich als eine zeitliche Referenz, als ein temporaler Vektor figuriert. 

 Definitorische vs. konnotative Konzepte von Nacht

Marie-Charlotte von Lehsten hat zwei Kategorien vorgestellt, die eine binäre Klassifikation ihrer Fragestellungen ermöglichen. So oszillieren die zu eruierenden definitorischen Konzepte von Nacht um die Frage ‚Was ist Nacht?‘ und sollen Wesensmerkmale, grundlegende Prädikationen dieses Naturphänomens zusammenbündeln. Zentral ist dabei, ob die Nacht nur ex negativo, als Abwesenheit von Licht, oder als eine Entität sui generis aufgefasst wird. Es wird jedoch nicht der Anspruch erhoben, eine einheitliche, kohärente, allgemein gültige Antwort in emphatischer Ausschließlichkeit aus den verschiedenen Texten herauszudestillieren. Intendiert wird vielmehr ein Vergleich verschiedener definitorischer Sedimente, die als Panorama erfasst und in ihren Synergien oder Rivalitäten beschrieben werden. Die konnotativen Konzepte gehen ihrerseits von folgendem Fragekatalog aus: ‚Wie wird die Nacht wahrgenommen?‘; ‚Was wird mit der Nacht assoziiert?‘; ‚Welche Emotionen werden mit der Nacht verbunden?‘; ‚Welche Arten von Handlungen kommen in der Nacht vor?‘; ‚Wie unterscheiden sich die Nachthandlungen von ihren Analoga tagsüber?‘. Auch hier wurde darauf hingewiesen, dass die Konnotate keinen invariablen Fundus bilden, sondern gattungsspezifisch und kontextsensitiv sind: So stehen etwa in den Tragödien die erotischen Semantiken, Liebe und Sexualität – entgegen dem intuitiven modernen Verständnis – regelmäßig außerhalb des Assoziationsradius der Nacht. Marie-Charlotte von Lehsten hat zudem betont, dass es sich in erster Linie um heuristische Kategorien handelt: Bei der praktischen Applizierung auf konkrete Textpassagen können nicht alle Erkenntnisse strikt nur der definitorischen oder der konnotativen Formation des hier entwickelten methodischen Substrats zugeordnet werden und es ist mit zahlreichen Interferenzen zu rechnen.

An einem Beispiel aus dem pseudo-euripideischen Rhesos (V. 285–289) wurde die abundante Konnotierung der Nacht als Zeit der Transgression illustriert. In einer Unterhaltung zwischen Hektor und einem Boten, der von Rhesosʼ nächtlicher Ankunft mit einem großen Heer berichtet, wird retrospektiv die Angst der Anwesenden geschildert, die Rhesosʼ Einmarsch als eine feindliche Aktion eingestuft haben. Im Modus einer kollektiven Deutung wird demonstriert, wie eine Handlung durch die Verabsolutierung des temporalen Bezugsrahmens bzw. nur aufgrund des Zeitindex Nacht, ohne Berücksichtigung anderer situativer Kriterien, als militärische Bedrohung, als Subversionsakt klassifiziert wird.

Allerdings hat Marie-Charlotte von Lehsten keine ausschließliche Prävalenz der negativen Lesarten postuliert, sondern deutlich gemacht, dass die Nacht auch positive Konnotate absorbieren kann. Auf die exponierten Gefahrsemantiken antithetisch beziehbar ist beispielsweise eine Textpassage aus der Ilias, wo der Nacht eine Schutzfunktion attribuiert wird: Hypnos, der Schlaf, evoziert einen früheren Konflikt mit Zeus, bei dem Zeus ihn aus dem Himmel verstoßen hätte, hätte ihn nicht Nyx, die Nacht, in Schutz genommen. Durch diese Angst vor dem eruptiven Zorn des höchsten Gottes exkulpiert Hypnos den Ungehorsam gegenüber Hera, die mit seiner Hilfe Zeusʼ Wachsamkeit manipulieren will. An Hypnosʼ formulierter Begründung für den abgelehnten Auftrag ließ sich darüber hinaus auch eine Inszenierung der Nacht als einer Autoritätsinstanz im griechischen Pantheon beobachten, wobei infolge dieser Machtkonzentration selbst Zeus eine Konfrontation mit ihr vermeidet. Das ist wiederum mit der Rolle der Nacht im mythologischen Stammbaum kongruent, wo sie mit hohem Alter prämiert wird bzw. eine der ersten Positionen in den genealogischen Götterphantasien einnimmt.

Fragen und Anregungen: Der Potentialis der Dissertation

Sollte man die Choreographie der Plenumssitzungen mit grammatischer Terminologie beschreiben, würde sich folgende Skizze ergeben: Während die Vorträge der jüngsten Generation im Graduiertenkolleg die morphologische Signatur des Futurs tragen und zahlreiche Fragen und Ansätze katalogisieren, denen man in den nächsten Arbeitsstadien nachgehen wird, kommen in der anschließenden Diskussion diverse Vorschläge zur Sprache, die möglicherweise in die Dissertation implementiert werden könnten und vorläufig als Potentialis festgehalten werden. Eine Anregung betraf beispielsweise die Eruierung der Affinitäten zwischen der Nacht und bestimmten Räumen, die als Schauplätze für nächtliche Handlungen favorisiert werden, wodurch stabile Chronotopoi herauszuarbeiten wären, an denen die Nacht partizipiert. Marie-Charlotte von Lehsten hat diese Fragestellung mit der transgressiven Funktion der Nacht in Korrelation gebracht und erklärt, dass der Nexus zwischen Nacht und Raum dahingehend zu definieren ist, dass nachts viele Räume zugänglicher werden bzw. dass die Nacht als Katalysator unter anderem für topographische Grenzüberschreitungen fungiert. Ferner wurde eine Öffnung des Textkorpus auch auf das Corpus Hippocraticum hin suggeriert, um die Auswirkungen der Nacht auf Körperfunktionen und Krankheitsbilder zu bestimmen. Ein anderer Vorschlag bezog sich auf die Berücksichtigung von Irregularitäten im Tag-Nacht-Wechsel, die sich etwa als Sonnenfinsternis manifestieren.
 

Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Sonja Speck: „Ursprünge und Entwicklung altägyptischer Körperkonzepte in prä- und frühdynastischer anthropomorpher Plastik“

Ein Beitrag von Marie-Charlotte v. Lehsten. 

In der Plenumssitzung des GRKs am 13. Juli 2017 stellte Sonja Speck ihr Dissertationsprojekt „Ursprünge und Entwicklung altägyptischer Körperkonzepte in prä- und frühdynastischer anthropomorpher Plastik“ vor. Sie präsentierte zunächst das Korpus der von ihr untersuchten Quellen und gab sodann einen Einblick in ihr aktuelles Arbeits- und Interessensfeld.

Quellenkorpus und Methodik

Ganz allgemein betrachtet ist es das Ziel von Sonja Specks Arbeit, die Wurzeln der altägyptischen anthropomorphen Plastik, die dank eines festen Kunstkanons über einen hohen Wiedererkennungswert verfügt, analytisch aufzuarbeiten. Durch das Nachzeichnen der Entwicklung dieser Wurzeln soll dann schließlich auch das Verständnis der daraus abgeleiteten anthropomorphen Plastik in der pharaonischen Zeit neu konturiert werden.

Den Kern der Arbeit bildet hierfür der Zeitraum von Mitte/Ende des 5. Jahrtausends bis etwa 2700 v. Chr., in dem es die Merimde-, Badari-, und Naqada-Kultur sowie den Beginn der altägyptischen Kultur bis zur dritten Dynastie zu untersuchen gilt. Die Analyse wird dabei anhand von 550-600 Objekten durchgeführt, die in dieser Arbeit zum ersten Mal als ein zusammenhängendes Korpus im Fokus stehen: Es handelt sich um sehr vielfältige Plastiken, deren Gemeinsamkeit im Vorhandensein anthropomorpher Elemente besteht. So werden beispielsweise Gefäße mit anthropomorphen Füßen ebenso einbezogen wie menschliche Figuren, Modellszenen mit mehreren gruppierten Personen ebenso wie Einzelfiguren. Beim Blick auf dieses Korpus lässt sich schnell erkennen, wie bestimmte Charakteristika – z.B. sog. „Vogelköpfe“ und weiße Röcke (vgl. Abb. 1) – zwischen den unterschiedlichen Objekttypen wandern.

Eine Besonderheit des Projekts besteht darin, dass für die Untersuchungen keine Texte herangezogen werden können, da sich der Schriftgebrauch im betrachteten Zeitraum erst in rudimentärer Form entwickelte bzw. auf sehr wenige Bereiche (v.a. Verwaltung) beschränkt war. Sonja Speck begegnet diesem Umstand durch die Heranziehung einer ganzen Bandbreite sich ergänzender Methoden, in erster Linie aus dem Bereich bildwissenschaftlicher und kognitionswissenschaftlicher Ansätze, die sie mit einer selbstentwickelten Technik der 3D-Dokumentation zur Untersuchung der Entwicklung von Körperproportionen verbindet.
 

Abb. 1: Frauenfigur, ca. 3500-3400 B.C.E., Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund,
07.447.505 (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 07.447.505_SL1.jpg).

Kunst und Kognition

Zur Zeit beschäftigt sich Sonja Speck vertieft mit der Frage, wie sich in Bildwerken Spuren gedanklicher Prozesse aufspüren lassen. Obwohl die Verbindung von Kognition und Kunst in der Forschung bislang meist an zweidimensionalen Werken analysiert wurde, geht Sonja Speck davon aus, dass bei der Herstellung eines dreidimensionalen Kunstgegenstands ganz ähnliche kognitive Abläufe stattfinden – auch wenn hier die Spuren der „Konvertierung“ einer Umweltwahrnehmung in ein Kunstwerk weniger offensichtlich sind.
Primäre Referenz für die Verbindung von Kognition und Kunst ist John Willats (v.a. Art and Representation, 1997), dem die Schaffung eines Vokabulars für Bildern zugrundeliegende Darstellungssysteme zu verdanken ist. Willats unterscheidet die beiden grundlegenden Kategorien der „drawing systems“ und „denotation systems“, anhand derer alle Arten von Darstellungen beschrieben werden können – mit Blick auf die Kunstproduktion lassen sie sich auch als „Werkzeuge“ bezeichnen, mittels derer ein Künstler eine Darstellung kreiert. „Drawing systems“ betreffen dabei die Art und Weise der Umsetzung räumlicher Elemente in Zeichnungen, etwa die Kategorien der Perspektive, der Schrägprojektion, Orthogonalprojektion; „denotation systems“ hingegen beziehen sich auf die Umsetzung von wahrgenommenen Elementen wie Kanten oder Konturen in Linien, Punkte oder Flächen.
Ein weiterer wichtiger Punkt für Sonja Specks Projekt ist die Frage nach der Herkunft der (realweltlichen bzw. mentalen) Vorlagen bildlicher Darstellungen. Während man Bilder lange Zeit als Produkt eines realen oder vorgestellten Blickes, also der visuellen Wahrnehmung des Künstlers ansah, hat sich dies inzwischen als defizient erwiesen: Gerade vor dem Hintergrund vermeintlicher Anomalien – z.B. im Bereich der „drawing systems“ der invertierten Perspektive, bei der der Bildbetrachter den Fluchtpunkt bildet, oder sog. „Klappbildern“, bei denen sich der Blickwinkel ändert – stellen sich kognitive Ansätze als fruchtbarer und zielführender dar. 
Grundlegend ist in diesem Bereich David Marrs Modell des Sehens als Informationsverarbeitung des Gehirns, dessen Kern die bei der visuellen Wahrnehmung ablaufende Übertragung einer betrachterzentrierten Beschreibung in eine interne objektzentrierte Beschreibung bildet: Im Gegensatz zu dem flüchtigen Sinneseindruck kann die interne objektzentrierte Beschreibung dauerhaft im Gehirn gespeichert werden und ist unabhängig von situativen Merkmalen wie etwa dem Blickwinkel – daher dient sie als Ausgangsbasis sowohl für das Wiedererkennen von Objekten als auch für die künstlerische Darstellung ebensolcher. Die kognitiven Prozesse, die bei der Sinneswahrnehmung, der Transformation in eine objektzentrierte Beschreibung und deren Bereitstellung für die künstlerische Wiedergabe ablaufen, unterscheiden sich dabei in Hinblick auf Zwei- oder Dreidimensionalität des zu produzierenden Kunstwerks nicht.

Eine andere für die Untersuchungen anthropomorpher Figuren zentrale Kategorie, die ursprünglich der Mathematik entstammt, aber auch in der Bildwissenschaft anwendbar ist, ist die der sog. topologischen Transformationen. Diese basieren auf dem Prinzip, dass bestimmte grundlegende Eigenschaften von Objekten invariabel bestehen bleiben, während sich andere speziellere Parameter wie Größe oder Oberflächenform ändern können – wobei die Wiedererkennung des Objekts nach wie vor gewährleistet ist. Beispiele für topologische Transformationen sind etwa Kinderbilder, schematische Diagramme und Karikaturen.  

„Drawing systems“, „extendedness“ und anthropomorphe Plastik

Sonja Speck widmet sich in ihrem Projekt nun der Frage, ob bzw. wie sich die beschriebenen Kategorien, insbesondere die „drawing systems“, auch für eine Untersuchung vormoderner Plastiken fruchtbar machen lassen – vor allem in Hinblick auf das Identifizieren von Konzepten. Als Beispiel präsentierte sie eine Frauenfigur, bei der sich Charakteristika wie der vergrößerte Unterkörper oder das einem Vogelschnabel ähnelnde Gesicht (vgl. Abb. 1) als topologische Transformationen beschreiben lassen können. Während historisierende Deutungsversuche wie medizinische Diagnostik des vergrößerten Gesäßes und Zuordnung eines solchen physischen Phänomens zu bestimmten Ethnien heute abzulehnen sind, eröffnet die kognitionsorientierte Betrachtung neue Horizonte: Ausgehend von der Annahme einer Fertigung der Plastik auf der Basis einer internen objektzentrierten Beschreibung und mittels topologischer Transformation (als ein „Werkzeug“ aus dem Bereich der „drawing systems“), lässt sich postulieren, dass gerade in den Bereichen der „Verformung“ nach hinter der Darstellung stehenden Konzepten zu suchen ist. Topologische Transformationen können also als eine Art Markierung von Konzepten fungieren.

Noch nicht ganz entschieden zeigte sich die Referentin in Bezug auf die Frage, ob auch „denotation systems“ auf die Beschreibung von Plastiken angewendet werden können, zumal die grundlegende Situation für deren Anwendung im Willats’schen Sinne – die Umsetzung aus der Drei- in die Zweidimensionalität – bei der Anfertigung von Plastiken nicht gegeben ist. Dennoch kommen auch dort unterschiedliche Darstellungssysteme zum Einsatz.

Eine ebenfalls von Willats propagierte Klassifikation bestimmter Merkmale, die sich in jedem Fall gewinnbringend zur Anwendung bringen lässt, ist die sog. „extendedness“. Sie bezieht sich auf Körper (Klumpen, Platten, Stäbe) und die Art ihrer Darstellung in zweidimensionalen Abbildungen (etwa als Kreis, längliche Region, Linie) sowie die Art und Weise, wie ein Betrachter einer Abbildung die abgebildeten Konturen, Silhouetten etc. wiederum als „ursprüngliche“ dreidimensionale Formen rekonstruiert. Ähnlich wie sich hier mutmaßlich universale Deutungsmuster eruieren lassen (z.B. wird ein abgebildeter Kreis nicht primär als Frontalansicht eines Stabes identifiziert), scheint sich dies auch in den untersuchten Plastiken niederzuschlagen, denn diese zeigen tendenziell generische Ansichten von Menschen, die offenbar schnell erkannt werden sollten. Typische Merkmale sind beispielsweise die Frontalansicht und die Symmetrie der Körperhälften. Gerade erstere wird bei fast allen untersuchten Plastiken, aber auch im späteren ägyptischen Kunstkanon ausgesprochen konsequent eingehalten.

Die Wahl der Körperform bei einer Plastik und die mit ihr verbundene „extendedness“ kann obendrein Aufschluss über dahinterstehende Konzepte, Teilkonzepte oder Konzeptgrenzen geben: Manche Figuren weisen z.B. eine erkennbare Untergliederung in Unter- und Oberkörper auf, während andere nur über einen stab- oder plattenförmigen Körper verfügen. An einem solchen lässt sich dementsprechend ein Konzept vom Körper als einer Einheit erschließen.

 

Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Oxana Polozhentseva: „Tote Körper: Semantiken des Sterblichen/Vergänglichen in den mittelalterlichen deutschen Texten“

Ein Beitrag von Sonja Speck.
 
Am 6. Juli 2017 war es an Oxana Polozhentseva, im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des GRKs ihr Dissertationsprojekt „Tote Körper: Semantiken des Sterblichen/Vergänglichen in den mittelalterlichen deutschen Texten“ vorzustellen. Ein Vortrag, der einerseits mit Spannung, andererseits, angesichts des thematischen Fokus auf der Vergänglichkeit des menschlichen Lebens und Körpers, mit einem leichten Schauern erwartet wurde. Jedoch gelang es Oxana Polozhentseva mit der Hilfe des im GRK hochgeschätzten Aristoteles, von Beginn an ihren Zuhörern einen weit positiveren Zugang zu ihrem Thema zu eröffnen: „Denn von Dingen, die wir in der Wirklichkeit nur ungern erblicken, sehen wir mit Freude möglichst getreue Abbildungen, z. B. Darstellungen von äußerst unansehnlichen Tieren und von Leichen“ (Aristoteles, Poetik 1448b10-12).

Abb. 1: Toter Ritter am Ufer von Evgeniya Kochkina.

 
Ziel des Vortrages war es, einige aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse anhand konkreter Textbeispiele vorzustellen und kontroverse Fragen des Themas im Plenum zu erörtern. Thematisch kreiste der Vortrag um die unterschiedlichen Aspekte des Umgangs mit toten Körpern, wie sie in der mittelhochdeutschen Literatur überliefert sind. Es sind vor allem drei Aspekte, die in der Literatur des Mittelalters behandelt werden: Transport, Einbalsamierung und Bestattung. Diese beinhalten bereits die Ambivalenz, die den Umgang mit toten Körpern im Mittelalter charakterisiert. Der Tod und die Konfrontation mit Leichnamen waren in dieser Zeit eine allgegenwärtige und alltägliche Sache. Dafür sorgten eine geringe Lebenserwartung aufgrund von Hungersnöten, Seuchen und Krankheiten wie Cholera und Pest und die Brutalität in Kriegen und im Strafrecht. Leichname mussten einerseits entfernt werden, um das normale Leben weitergehen zu lassen, andererseits versuchte man die soziale Bindung zu Toten und damit deren Kontakt zum Leben aufrecht zu erhalten, vor allem in Zusammenhang mit den Fragen des Erbes und der Herkunft.
 
Oxana Polozhentseva konnte zwei große Diskursbereiche über Sterben und Tod herausarbeiten: Den unausweichlichen Tod, der als natürliche Gegebenheit betrachtet wird und besonders in medizinischen und rechtlichen Texten behandelt wurde, und den subjektiven Tod – was der Mensch selbst mit dem Tod in Verbindung bringt –, der vor allem in literarischen Texten thematisiert wurde. Der Vortrag beschäftigte sich mit dem letzteren Todesdiskurs.
 

Schöner Tod vs. hässlicher Tod

Der Diskurs rund um den subjektiven Tod weist eine grundlegende Dichotomie auf: Der schöne Tod steht dem hässlichen Tod gegenüber. Der schöne Tod wird dadurch charakterisiert, dass der Sterbende das Herannahen des Todes fühlt, allerdings unter keinerlei Gebrechen oder Schmerzen zu leiden hat und im Kreis von Familie und Freunden dem Tod feierlich und in völliger Akzeptanz entgegentritt. Eine besondere Erwähnung findet meist auch die Vorstellung des corpus incorruptum – des perfekten, schönen und unverweslichen Leichnams. Meist sind es Heilige und zum Teil Adlige, deren Tod in der mittelalterlichen Literatur derart beschrieben wird. Vor allem Tod und Himmelfahrt Mariens dienten als Vorbild für diese Sichtweise auf den Tod besonderer Personen. 

Der hässliche Tod hingegen erscheint im Diskurs häufig als der massenhafte und damit anonyme Tod von Soldaten auf dem Schlachtfeld, der durchaus mit Plünderungen einhergeht. Auch Frauen sterben in der mittelalterlichen Literatur den hässlichen Tod. In diesen Fällen sind es meist psychische Todesursachen wie Zorn, psychischer Schmerz und auch Selbstmord, die die Frauen dahinraffen. Sterben adlige Helden auf dem Schlachtfeld, so kann auch dies als schöner Tod – lang, rituell, bei vollem Bewusstsein und mit Duftwunder und Engelerscheinung – beschrieben werden. Allerdings entsteht beim Tod des Helden in den höfischen Romanen häufig eine Art Mischform zwischen dem schönen und hässlichen Tod, denn obwohl der Held nach christlichem Vorbild dahinscheidet, befindet er sich auf dem Schlachtfeld in der Ferne und stirbt ohne Beistand durch Priester und Familie.
 

Die Einbalsamierung

Oxana Polozhentseva betonte die auffallend wichtige Rolle der Einbalsamierung in der Darstellung toter Körper in der mittelalterlichen Literatur, die interessanterweise die Diskurse des schönen und hässlichen Todes gleichermaßen betrifft. Die Einbalsamierung erfüllt den Zweck, eine längere Wartezeit zwischen Tod und Bestattung zu überbrücken, in der der Leichnam in perfektem bzw. einigermaßen annehmbarem Zustand verbleibt. Gründe hierfür sind etwa lange Bestattungsfeierlichkeiten und die Anreise von Gästen oder beim Tod in der Fremde die Heimführung des Leichnams. In Einbalsamierungsbeschreibungen nehmen die Ölung, Salbung und das Versehen mit Duftstoffen sowie das anschließende Einschlagen des Leichnams in Stoffe einen hohen Stellenwert als „gute“ Behandlung des Leichnams ein. Die Entnahme und das Heimsenden von Organen, insbesondere des Herzens, als pars pro toto kommen vor allem in Zusammenhang mit dem Tod in der Fremde vor. Auch das Kochen der Leiche zum Zweck der Skelettierung hat dort seinen Platz und wird häufig in die Nähe der Kreuzzugthematik gerückt. Allerdings wird das Kochen der Leiche und Heimsenden der Knochen meist als pietätloser Umgang mit dem Leichnam angesehen. In Papst Bonifaz‘ VIII. Bulle Detestandae feritatis  von 1299 findet sich auch ein konkretes Verbot.
In der deutschen Fassung des Rolandsliedes des Pfaffen Konrad (um 1170) wird einerseits die Bestattung von Soldaten in einem Massengrab auf dem Schlachtfeld thematisiert, andererseits die Einbalsamierung und der Heimtransport dreier adliger Helden (Roland, Olivier und Bischof Turpin), die in derselben Schlacht ums Leben gekommen waren. Die Behandlung toter Körper ist demnach maßgeblich abhängig vom geistlichen und weltlichen sozialen Status der Toten. Der Dichter des Rolandsliedes beschreibt die Einbalsamierung der Helden mit größtem Detailreichtum als einen traditionsreichen und für den Adel angemessenen Brauch. Damit wird im Grunde die reale Praxis der Einbalsamierung vor dem adligen Publikum bestätigt und gutgeheißen.

Ein weiteres interessantes Beispiel, dieses Mal aus der Textgattung des Artusromans, ist der Tod und das „Nachleben“ von Parcevals Schwester im Prosa-Lancelot. Während der Gralssuche der Helden sieht Parcevals Schwester, die sie begleitet, ihren Tod herannahen und gibt detaillierte Anweisungen zur Behandlung ihres Leichnams. Ihr toter Körper soll einbalsamiert und auf ein Schiff gelegt werden. Dieses soll ziellos losgeschickt werden, sodass die Schwester irgendwann den Gral erreichen würde. Ihrem Wunsch wird entsprochen und nach ungefähr sieben Jahren erreicht das Schiff tatsächlich den Ort, an dem die Helden zuvor den Gral gefunden hatten. Wie durch ein Wunder am Ziel angekommen, erhält Parcevals Schwester eine fürstliche Bestattung. Die Gralssuche ist eine ausschließlich männlich geprägte aventiure. Eine Frau kann so nur tot daran „teilnehmen“. Tatsächlich behält Parcevals Schwester selbst nach ihrem Tod ihre Integrität als Figur innerhalb der Geschichte. Weder ihre Präsenz noch ihre Handlungsfähigkeit gehen verloren, vielmehr erhält ihr Körper nach Tod und Einbalsamierung höchste Mobilität und ist fortan unveränderlich. In diesen Bereichen überflügelt sie alle anderen Figuren in der Geschichte. In diesem Zusammenhang kann die literarische Einbalsamierung Mittel sein, eine Figur über ihre zunächst angelegten Eigenschaften hinaus auf eine andere erzählerische Ebene zu heben und sie räumlich und zeitlich vom Rest der Geschichte abzugrenzen.

 
Mit diesem ersten thematischen Einblick konnte Oxana Polozhentseva dem Plenum verdeutlichen, warum sie tote Körper in der mittelalterlichen Literatur zum Gegenstand ihres Promotionsprojekts erkoren hat. Es ist die Ambivalenz zwischen Alltäglichkeit und Besonderem, zwischen Brutalität des Todes und dem Wunder des Überdauerns im Bemühen der Autoren dieser Zeit, den Tod literarisch zu bewältigen, die fasziniert und möglicherweise auch erschauern lässt.

 

Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Oxana Polozhentseva: „Tote Körper: Semantiken des Sterblichen/Vergänglichen in den mittelalterlichen deutschen Texten“

Ein Beitrag von Sonja Speck.
 
Am 6. Juli 2017 war es an Oxana Polozhentseva, im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des GRKs ihr Dissertationsprojekt „Tote Körper: Semantiken des Sterblichen/Vergänglichen in den mittelalterlichen deutschen Texten“ vorzustellen. Ein Vortrag, der einerseits mit Spannung, andererseits, angesichts des thematischen Fokus auf der Vergänglichkeit des menschlichen Lebens und Körpers, mit einem leichten Schauern erwartet wurde. Jedoch gelang es Oxana Polozhentseva mit der Hilfe des im GRK hochgeschätzten Aristoteles, von Beginn an ihren Zuhörern einen weit positiveren Zugang zu ihrem Thema zu eröffnen: „Denn von Dingen, die wir in der Wirklichkeit nur ungern erblicken, sehen wir mit Freude möglichst getreue Abbildungen, z. B. Darstellungen von äußerst unansehnlichen Tieren und von Leichen“ (Aristoteles, Poetik 1448b10-12).

Abb. 1: Toter Ritter am Ufer von Evgeniya Kochkina.

 
Ziel des Vortrages war es, einige aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse anhand konkreter Textbeispiele vorzustellen und kontroverse Fragen des Themas im Plenum zu erörtern. Thematisch kreiste der Vortrag um die unterschiedlichen Aspekte des Umgangs mit toten Körpern, wie sie in der mittelhochdeutschen Literatur überliefert sind. Es sind vor allem drei Aspekte, die in der Literatur des Mittelalters behandelt werden: Transport, Einbalsamierung und Bestattung. Diese beinhalten bereits die Ambivalenz, die den Umgang mit toten Körpern im Mittelalter charakterisiert. Der Tod und die Konfrontation mit Leichnamen waren in dieser Zeit eine allgegenwärtige und alltägliche Sache. Dafür sorgten eine geringe Lebenserwartung aufgrund von Hungersnöten, Seuchen und Krankheiten wie Cholera und Pest und die Brutalität in Kriegen und im Strafrecht. Leichname mussten einerseits entfernt werden, um das normale Leben weitergehen zu lassen, andererseits versuchte man die soziale Bindung zu Toten und damit deren Kontakt zum Leben aufrecht zu erhalten, vor allem in Zusammenhang mit den Fragen des Erbes und der Herkunft.
 
Oxana Polozhentseva konnte zwei große Diskursbereiche über Sterben und Tod herausarbeiten: Den unausweichlichen Tod, der als natürliche Gegebenheit betrachtet wird und besonders in medizinischen und rechtlichen Texten behandelt wurde, und den subjektiven Tod – was der Mensch selbst mit dem Tod in Verbindung bringt –, der vor allem in literarischen Texten thematisiert wurde. Der Vortrag beschäftigte sich mit dem letzteren Todesdiskurs.
 

Schöner Tod vs. hässlicher Tod

Der Diskurs rund um den subjektiven Tod weist eine grundlegende Dichotomie auf: Der schöne Tod steht dem hässlichen Tod gegenüber. Der schöne Tod wird dadurch charakterisiert, dass der Sterbende das Herannahen des Todes fühlt, allerdings unter keinerlei Gebrechen oder Schmerzen zu leiden hat und im Kreis von Familie und Freunden dem Tod feierlich und in völliger Akzeptanz entgegentritt. Eine besondere Erwähnung findet meist auch die Vorstellung des corpus incorruptum – des perfekten, schönen und unverweslichen Leichnams. Meist sind es Heilige und zum Teil Adlige, deren Tod in der mittelalterlichen Literatur derart beschrieben wird. Vor allem Tod und Himmelfahrt Mariens dienten als Vorbild für diese Sichtweise auf den Tod besonderer Personen. 

Der hässliche Tod hingegen erscheint im Diskurs häufig als der massenhafte und damit anonyme Tod von Soldaten auf dem Schlachtfeld, der durchaus mit Plünderungen einhergeht. Auch Frauen sterben in der mittelalterlichen Literatur den hässlichen Tod. In diesen Fällen sind es meist psychische Todesursachen wie Zorn, psychischer Schmerz und auch Selbstmord, die die Frauen dahinraffen. Sterben adlige Helden auf dem Schlachtfeld, so kann auch dies als schöner Tod – lang, rituell, bei vollem Bewusstsein und mit Duftwunder und Engelerscheinung – beschrieben werden. Allerdings entsteht beim Tod des Helden in den höfischen Romanen häufig eine Art Mischform zwischen dem schönen und hässlichen Tod, denn obwohl der Held nach christlichem Vorbild dahinscheidet, befindet er sich auf dem Schlachtfeld in der Ferne und stirbt ohne Beistand durch Priester und Familie.
 

Die Einbalsamierung

Oxana Polozhentseva betonte die auffallend wichtige Rolle der Einbalsamierung in der Darstellung toter Körper in der mittelalterlichen Literatur, die interessanterweise die Diskurse des schönen und hässlichen Todes gleichermaßen betrifft. Die Einbalsamierung erfüllt den Zweck, eine längere Wartezeit zwischen Tod und Bestattung zu überbrücken, in der der Leichnam in perfektem bzw. einigermaßen annehmbarem Zustand verbleibt. Gründe hierfür sind etwa lange Bestattungsfeierlichkeiten und die Anreise von Gästen oder beim Tod in der Fremde die Heimführung des Leichnams. In Einbalsamierungsbeschreibungen nehmen die Ölung, Salbung und das Versehen mit Duftstoffen sowie das anschließende Einschlagen des Leichnams in Stoffe einen hohen Stellenwert als „gute“ Behandlung des Leichnams ein. Die Entnahme und das Heimsenden von Organen, insbesondere des Herzens, als pars pro toto kommen vor allem in Zusammenhang mit dem Tod in der Fremde vor. Auch das Kochen der Leiche zum Zweck der Skelettierung hat dort seinen Platz und wird häufig in die Nähe der Kreuzzugthematik gerückt. Allerdings wird das Kochen der Leiche und Heimsenden der Knochen meist als pietätloser Umgang mit dem Leichnam angesehen. In Papst Bonifaz‘ VIII. Bulle Detestandae feritatis  von 1299 findet sich auch ein konkretes Verbot.
In der deutschen Fassung des Rolandsliedes des Pfaffen Konrad (um 1170) wird einerseits die Bestattung von Soldaten in einem Massengrab auf dem Schlachtfeld thematisiert, andererseits die Einbalsamierung und der Heimtransport dreier adliger Helden (Roland, Olivier und Bischof Turpin), die in derselben Schlacht ums Leben gekommen waren. Die Behandlung toter Körper ist demnach maßgeblich abhängig vom geistlichen und weltlichen sozialen Status der Toten. Der Dichter des Rolandsliedes beschreibt die Einbalsamierung der Helden mit größtem Detailreichtum als einen traditionsreichen und für den Adel angemessenen Brauch. Damit wird im Grunde die reale Praxis der Einbalsamierung vor dem adligen Publikum bestätigt und gutgeheißen.

Ein weiteres interessantes Beispiel, dieses Mal aus der Textgattung des Artusromans, ist der Tod und das „Nachleben“ von Parcevals Schwester im Prosa-Lancelot. Während der Gralssuche der Helden sieht Parcevals Schwester, die sie begleitet, ihren Tod herannahen und gibt detaillierte Anweisungen zur Behandlung ihres Leichnams. Ihr toter Körper soll einbalsamiert und auf ein Schiff gelegt werden. Dieses soll ziellos losgeschickt werden, sodass die Schwester irgendwann den Gral erreichen würde. Ihrem Wunsch wird entsprochen und nach ungefähr sieben Jahren erreicht das Schiff tatsächlich den Ort, an dem die Helden zuvor den Gral gefunden hatten. Wie durch ein Wunder am Ziel angekommen, erhält Parcevals Schwester eine fürstliche Bestattung. Die Gralssuche ist eine ausschließlich männlich geprägte aventiure. Eine Frau kann so nur tot daran „teilnehmen“. Tatsächlich behält Parcevals Schwester selbst nach ihrem Tod ihre Integrität als Figur innerhalb der Geschichte. Weder ihre Präsenz noch ihre Handlungsfähigkeit gehen verloren, vielmehr erhält ihr Körper nach Tod und Einbalsamierung höchste Mobilität und ist fortan unveränderlich. In diesen Bereichen überflügelt sie alle anderen Figuren in der Geschichte. In diesem Zusammenhang kann die literarische Einbalsamierung Mittel sein, eine Figur über ihre zunächst angelegten Eigenschaften hinaus auf eine andere erzählerische Ebene zu heben und sie räumlich und zeitlich vom Rest der Geschichte abzugrenzen.

 
Mit diesem ersten thematischen Einblick konnte Oxana Polozhentseva dem Plenum verdeutlichen, warum sie tote Körper in der mittelalterlichen Literatur zum Gegenstand ihres Promotionsprojekts erkoren hat. Es ist die Ambivalenz zwischen Alltäglichkeit und Besonderem, zwischen Brutalität des Todes und dem Wunder des Überdauerns im Bemühen der Autoren dieser Zeit, den Tod literarisch zu bewältigen, die fasziniert und möglicherweise auch erschauern lässt.

 

„Körper und die Medizin der Alten Welt“ – 37. Treffen des Interdisziplinären Arbeitskreises „Alte Medizin“

 
Am 1. und 2. Juli 2017 fand im Institut für Geschichte, Theorie und Ethik der Medizin der Universität Mainz das nunmehr 37. Treffen des Interdisziplinären Arbeitskreises (IAK) „Alte Medizin“ statt. Organisiert von Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening, Prof. Dr. Livia Prüll und in diesem Jahr auch Prof. Dr. Marietta Horster, fand die Tagung bereits zum zweiten Mal im neuen Format mit sowohl einer thematisch gebundenen Sektion (unter dem Titel „Körper und die Medizin der Alten Welt“) als auch der Möglichkeit zur Präsentation offener Themen statt. Unter den Vortragenden war dabei auch das GRK durch unsere Kolleginnen Shahrzad Irannejad und Rebekka Pabst vertreten.

 

Körper und Medizin in der griechisch-römischen Antike


Nach der Begrüßung und Einführung in das Tagesthema durch die Organisatorinnen wurde das Treffen durch den Keynote-Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Philip van der Eijk (Berlin) eingeleitet. Unter dem Titel „Making Sense of the Body“ beschäftigte er sich mit griechischen Vorstellungen über die Abläufe und Prozesse im Körper. Von den verschiedenen Methoden, Wissen in dieser Hinsicht zu erlangen – etwa Sektion, metaphorische Übertragung, Deutung körperlicher Zeichen – untersuchte van der Eijk vor allem die letztere: Bereits bei Hippokrates sind Listen für die Auslegung medizinischer Semiotika belegt.
Als spezielles Beispiel für ein solches Vorgehen präsentierte van der Eijk Galens Äußerungen über die Möglichkeit, durch bloße Berührung Aussagen über die Mischung der vier Qualitäten – heiß, kalt, trocken, nass – im menschlichen Körper zu erlangen. Das Konzept der Mischung („krasis“) tritt schon bei Hippokrates auf, wird von Galen jedoch deutlich ausgeweitet und zu einem Schlüsselkonzept seiner Lehre – vor allem erhält es durch die Möglichkeit des Erfühlens einen empirischen Zugang. Interessant sind dabei auch die außergewöhnlichen Fähigkeiten, die Galen dem menschlichen Tastsinn zuschreibt, etwa das mit ihm verknüpfte Erinnerungsvermögen.
 
Auch die weiteren Präsentationen des ersten Tages waren der griechischen Antike gewidmet: Dr. med. Malte Stoffregen (Berlin) verhandelte in seinem Vortrag „Zur Kenntnis operativer Geschlechtskorrekturen in der Medizin des Hellenismus“ zwei Passagen des Diodorus Siculus aus moderner medizinischer Sicht und verglich die dort geschilderten Befunde und Maßnahmen mit ähnlichen Belegen in späteren Texten.
 
PD Dr. med. Mathias Witt, M.A. (München) stellte unter dem Titel „Die Zurichtung des Körpers – ‚Organiké‘ und ‚Organikoí‘: orthopädische Maschinen im antiken Alexandria“ einen speziellen (von der allg. Chirurgie abgegrenzten) Zweig der antiken Chirurgie vor, der sich der Einrenkung von Knochen mit mechanischen Hilfsmitteln widmete. Im Fokus standen dabei die Beleglage zu diesem Gegenstand, die Einordnung der als „organikoí“ bezeichneten Ärzte, sowie deren medizinische Praktiken und Geräte.
 
Der erste Konferenztag wurde beschlossen vom Vortrag Prof. Dr. Josef Neumanns (Halle), „Behinderte Götter und Menschen in der griechisch-archaischen Mythologie und Gesellschaft“, mit Fokus auf den homerischen Figuren Hephaistos und Thersites, die vor dem Hintergrund der im griechischen Begriff „teras“ kristallisierten Verbindung von Missbildung und Furcht vor Unheil als stigmatisierte, im Kreis ihrer Gesellschaft Zurückweisung und Hohn erfahrende Charaktere gedeutet wurden.

 

Der menschliche Körper aus verschiedenen kulturhistorischen Blickwinkeln betrachtet


Der zweite Konferenztag begann mit der Fortsetzung der Sektion zum Thema „Körper“. Den Anfang machte unsere Kollegin aus dem Graduiertenkolleg, Shahrzad Irannejad, Pharm.D. (Mainz), die über den „Healthy body (as vessel for the soul) in the medieval Islamicate world“ referierte. Als Ausgangspunkt ihrer Untersuchung dienten Schriften des mittelalterlichen Gelehrten Avicenna (10. Jh.), dessen Auffassung nach der Körper, sofern gesund, der ihm innenwohnenden Seele zur endgültigen Perfektion verhelfen konnte. Avicenna bezieht sich jedoch u.a. auf antike Schriften, wie die des Aristoteles oder Hippokrates, sodass in seine Werke antike Ideen einflossen und sich mit der mittelalterlichen Denkweise mischten. Vor diesem Hintergrund diskutierte die Sprecherin die Frage, inwiefern diese beiden Vorstellungswelten miteinander in Konflikt standen, welche Definition von einem „gesunden Körper“ jeweils zugrunde lag und wie Avicenna mit derartigen Spannungen umging.

Im Anschluss daran stellte Rebekka Pabst, B.A. (Mainz), die ab Oktober zur Gruppe der Kollegiat*innen unseres GRKs gehören wird, „Überlegungen zu den Konzepten von Fleisch (äg. jwf) als Heilmittel sowie als Metapher für den menschlichen Körper im Alten Ägypten“ vor und präsentierte einen Teil der Ergebnisse ihrer kürzlich abgeschlossenen Masterarbeit (Abb. 1). Sie legte dar, dass das ägyptische Wort für Fleisch innerhalb der Textquellen in den verschiedensten Kontexten auftritt und sich dessen Bedeutung nicht nur auf tierisches Fleisch im Sinne von Nahrung beschränkt, sondern dass jwf auch den menschlichen oder den göttlichen Körper sowie Teile davon bezeichnen kann, und dass der Terminus darüber hinaus auch im Zusammenhang medizinischer Texte als Bestandteil von Rezepten zur Wundheilung auftritt. 

Mit medizinischen bzw. pharmakologischen Texten beschäftigte sich auch der letzte Vortrag innerhalb der Körper-Sektion: Dr. Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (London) referierte zu „Two late Byzantine collections of recipes: The cases of Nikephoros Blemmydes and Gregory Chioniades“. Während die Schriften der beiden geistlichen Gelehrten sich inhaltlich doch deutlich unterschieden, so ist ihnen ein entscheidender Punkt gemeinsam: In ihren Rezepten erwähnen beide verschiedene heilende Substanzen, die aus dem asiatischen Raum stammen und zuvor im byzantinischen Raum unbekannt waren, wie Galgant oder Kampher. Anhand dieser Beispiele kann untersucht werden, welchen Einfluss andere Kulturen auf die byzantinischen pharmakologischen Arbeiten ausübten und welcher Stellenwert den neuen und „exotischen“ Ingredienzen gegenüber den traditionellen Heilmitteln zukam.



Abb.1: Referentin Rebekka Pabst auf dem 37. Treffen des IAK „Alte Medizin“ (Foto: M.-C. v. Lehsten).



Die Medizin der Alten Welt – Offene Themen


Nach einer kleinen Pause mit Kaffee und Gebäck folgte die nächste Sektion, die den „offenen Themen“ gewidmet war und den Vortragenden somit mehr Raum in der Themenwahl bot. Zu Beginn referierte Dr. des. Frank Ursin, M.A. (Ulm) über „Gallensteine und Leberverstopfung in den medizinischen Fachschriften der Antike“. Während durch archäologische Befunde belegt ist, dass Gallensteine kein alleiniges Übel unserer modernen Zeit sind – so litt bspw. bereits die berühmte Gletscher-Mumie „Ötzi“ darunter – fehlen solche Belege für die Griechen und Römer völlig und auch in den textlichen Quellen gibt es bestenfalls zwei vage Hinweise. Entgegen der verbreiteten Forschungsmeinung, dass Griechen und Römer gar nicht unter Gallensteinen litten, argumentierte Ursin in seinem Beitrag, dass die Erkrankung möglicherweise lediglich anders benannt worden war.

Dr. Sophia Xenophontos (Glasgow) behandelte in ihrem Vortrag mit dem Titel „Philosophical protreptic in Galen’s Exhortation to the Study of Medicine“ ein in der Forschung bereits kontrovers diskutiertes Werk – spricht Galen im ersten, erhaltenen Teil doch von Kunst, während seine Ausführungen zur Medizin im zweiten Teil des Werkes heute verloren sind. Xenophontos betrachtete die Schrift aus einem neuen Blickwinkel und nutzte sie, um sich ein Bild von Galens Beziehung zu seinem Auditorium sowie von seinem Einfluss im Bereich der Protreptik zu machen.

Dr. med. dent. Siegwart Peters (Leichlingen) nahm schließlich noch die „Krankenversorgung außerhalb des römischen Militärs – Zivile valetudinaria“ in den Blick. In Analogie zu den gut belegten und bereits untersuchten römischen Militärkrankenhäusern stellte Peters die Frage, ob ähnliche Einrichtungen nicht auch im zivilen Bereich zu erwarten wären. Im Anschluss an eine gründliche Analyse (in)schriftlicher Quellen, um zu einer möglichst genauen Begriffsdefinition von ‚valetudinarium‚ zu gelangen, wurden auch archäologische Befunde hinzugezogen und Architekturgrundrisse (z.B. von villae rusticae oder sog. „Arzthäusern“ wie dem in Pompeji) im Hinblick auf geeignete Raumeinheiten untersucht.

Den Abschluss des zweitägigen Arbeitskreistreffens bildete der Bericht „The Digital Corpus of Greek Medical Papyri: An appraisal“ von Dr. Nicola Reggiani (Parma; stellvertretend auch für seine beiden Kolleginnen Dr. Isabella Bonati und Francesca Bertonazzi), der das DIGMEDTEXT-Projekt der Universität Parma vorstellte. Ziel des Projektes war es, eine digitale Sammlung der griechischen Papyri medizinischen Inhalts zu erstellen. Auf diese Weise steht nun ein rund 300 Texte umfassendes Korpus online zur Verfügung, welches durch die Verknüpfung mit der lexikographischen Ressource „Medicalia Online“ neue Möglichkeiten der Forschung eröffnet und so unser Wissen über die antike Medizin erweitern kann.

 

Forschungskolloquium der Altertumswissenschaften in Potsdam 04.07.2017

Ein Beitrag von Dominic Bärsch.
„Da haben Sie absolutes Glück gehabt, dass Sie am ersten Tag nach dem furchtbaren Weltuntergangswetter hierhergekommen sind!“ Mit dieser Einleitung begrüßte mich Frau PD Dr. Nicola Hömke am Dienstagnachmittag auf dem wunderschönen Campus der Universität Potsdam, der noch in der letzten Woche von sintflutartigen Regenfällen heimgesucht wurde.




Abb. 1: Porticus und Neues Palais (Foto: Dominic Bärsch).

Frau Hömke hatte mich vor einigen Monaten eingeladen, die Ergebnisse meiner Dissertation im dortigen Forschungskolloquium vorzustellen und mit dem Auditorium über diese zu diskutieren. Da sie selbst eine Expertin auf dem Gebiet der Ästhetik des Schrecklichen in der antiken und spätantiken Literatur ist, versprach ich mir auch zahlreiche Anregungen und Denkanstöße besonders für den Bereich der lateinischen Literatur. Diese stellte ich in meinem Vortrag „Ruet moles et machina mundi – Variationen des Weltuntergangs in der lateinischen Literatur“ deshalb auch bewusst in den Vordergrund und warf nur einige Seitenblicke auf die griechischen Autoren. So wurden meine Erwartungen auch nicht enttäuscht, da sich an den Vortrag eine rege Diskussion anschloss, die mir einige interessante Anstöße lieferte, die ich in der Endphase meiner Dissertationsphase in mein Projekt einarbeiten kann. Besonders spannend gestaltete sich die Vermutung Frau Hömkes, dass es Ähnlichkeiten zwischen den antiken Narrativen eines zeitlichen Endes der Welt und eines räumlichen Endes ebendieser geben könnte. Gemeinsame Nachforschungen sollen diese These in den nächsten Wochen untermauern oder entkräften.

Nach dem eigentlichen Vortrag wurde dann noch das gemeinsame Abendessen mit einigen Teilnehmern des Kolloquiums begangen. In ausgesprochen angenehmer Atmosphäre wurden mir Einblicke in das Potsdamer Universitätsleben gewährt und akademische Anekdoten ausgetauscht.

Dieser Kurzausflug in den Norden hat mir vor allem gezeigt, dass die Universitätsstadt Potsdam eine wahre Perle ist, die oft durch die geographische Nähe zu Berlin zu Unrecht in dessen Schatten gerückt wird, sich im Gegenteil jedoch keinesfalls verstecken muss: Sie kann sowohl mit einer wunderschönen Erscheinung als auch mit ausgezeichnetem und herzlichem wissenschaftlichem Personal aufwarten.

Für die Erfahrungen, Rückmeldungen und Denkanstöße möchte ich mich einerseits bei Frau Hömke und ihren Mitarbeitern bedanken, die keine Mühen gescheut haben, meinen Aufenthalt so angenehm wie möglich zu gestalten. Als Abschiedsgeschenk wurde mir sogar der gerade erst erschienene Tagungsband „Bilder von dem einen Gott – Die Rhetorik des Bildes in monotheistischen Gottesdarstellungen der Spätantike“ überreicht, der das Ergebnis eines interdisziplinären Arbeitsprojektes ist und wertvolle Untersuchungen zu dem Gebiet der religiösen Rhetorik bereitstellt.

Andererseits sei aber auch dem Graduiertenkolleg gedankt, das meine Reise hierhin auch mit finanziellen Mitteln anteilig unterstützt hat.

A Report of the International Conference “The Exchange of Medical Knowledge Past and Present between Austria and Iran”, Vienna

A weblog entry by Shahrzad Irannejad. 

On the 26th and 27th of June, the Working Group History of Medicine of the Commission for the History of Sciences and Humanities of the Austrian Academy of Sciences hosted in Vienna a small but a very fruitful International Conference dedicated to the several aspects of The Exchange of Medical Knowledge Past and Present between Austria and Iran. A major point of focus of this conference was the context, the person and the works of Eduard Jakub Polak, an Austrian physician, who was the first teacher of „Western“ medicine in 19th century Iran. History of medicine in Qajar era is of great interest to me, as the Qajar era in Iran is very important for the study of humoral medicine as a medical paradigm. This era marks a point of paradigm shift in medicine in Iran. I was invited to the conference to provide an introduction to the state of humoral medicine as it arrived in the Qajar era. It was a great opportunity to meet up close many scholars in the field, whose work I had followed over recent years.

The event had as its preface a pleasant performance of Persia traditional music by the Simorgh Ensemble. Then we had the welcome and opening remarks by Hermann Hunger, Head of the Commission for the History of Sciences and Humanities, Austrian Academy of Sciences; Helmut Denk and Felicitas Seebacher, Chairpersons of the working group History of Medicine, Commission for the History of Sciences and Humanities, Austrian Academy of Sciences; Afsaneh Gächter, the organizer of the conference who is a visiting researcher, at Josephinum – Ethics, Collections and History of Medicine of the Medical University of Vienna and a member of the working group History of Medicine, Commission for the History of Sciences and Humanities, Austrian Academy of Sciences. Her main research focus is Eduard Jakub Polak, and this conference was meant as a concluding step of her most recent publication project on him.

To provide a context for the next presentations of the conference, I presented „Medicine between Occident and Orient: Texts and Ideas in Transit“. I discussed how the Perso-Arab world inherited its core medical ideas from the Greeks, and elaborated upon and made sense of these ideas in a new linguistic and cultural context. After a brief tribute to Galen (among other scholars of the Hellenistic era), I presented how his ideas were transferred to the Islamicate world through the „Abbasid Translation Movement“. I discussed how systematic translations of knowledge in 8th century Baghdad made the rise of such stars as Avicenna (980-1037) possible. I presented how medical ideas were transformed through transfer beyond geographical, linguistic, and cultural borders and by processes involving commentaries, encyclopedic summaries, translation and further interpretation and transformation. I then discussed in brief the various aspects of the Avicennean corpus as the common medical heritage of humoral and modern medicine. In order for us to better understand the state of humoral medicine in Qajar Iran, before and throughout its encounter with „modern“ medicine.

Figure 1: Prof. Hormoz Ebrahimnejad delivering the keynote speech in the Theatersaal of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

 
Prof. Hormoz Ebrahimnejad (University of Southampton) delivered an insightful keynote speech entitled „Jacob Polak’s Place in the Development of Medicine in Nineteenth Century Iran“. He challenged the conventional idea that in Qajar Iran there was a clear-cut distinction between „Western“ and „Traditional“ medicine. He argued that Polak’s work, as perceived in Iran, represented the apex of the period in which medical transformation was characterised with dialogue between Iranian and Western medicine. He examined Polak’s books and lectures, as translated by his students at the Dâr al-Fonun, to analyse a type of medical modernisation that involved the active participation of traditional resources.


I had the honor the chair the first panel of the second day of the conference. Marcel Chahrour, (Commission for the History of Sciences and Humanities, Austrian Academy of Sciences) talked about „Austrian Physicians and the Discovery of the Medical Orient“. Dr. Afsaneh Gächter presented „Austrian Physician Jacob E. Polak as a Pioneer of the Modern Lithotomy in Iran“. And Dr. Shahrokh Shariat shared with us what the life lessons of Polak mean for him as a prominent urologist. To wrap up the session, David Venclík, PhD from Charles University (Prague), talked about „A Jewish Physician from Bohemia in the Persian Court – Jacob E. Polak’s Reception in Czech Sources“. 

Figure 2: Dr. Afsaneh Gächter (also the organizer of the conference) discussing the textbooks Polak wrote in Persian with the help of his assistants (Photos by Shahrzad Irannejad).

The second panel, chaired by Agnes G. Loeffler (University of Wisconsin), dealt with Austrian doctors in Iran in more recent times. Michael Hubenstorf (Medical University of Vienna) talked about „Austrian Nazi-Displaced Physicians in Iran 1947-1962“. Anthropologist Erika Friedl (Western Michigan University) dedicated her lecture to the heritage of a hardworking lady and presented the paper „Professor Elfriede Kohout, MD, in the Medical Traditions of Shiraz“. Dr. Mohammadhossein Azizi (Iranian Academy of Medical Sciences) payed tribute to his late Professors in Shiraz by his speech „A Look at Two Austrian Medical Professors at the University of Shiraz – Dr. Werner Dutz and Dr. Joseph Tomasch“. 

Figure 3: Dr. Mohammadhossein Azizi presenting the story of the Austrian Dr. Tomasch in Shiraz University (Photos by Shahrzad Irannejad).

The third panel, chaired by Erika Friedl, was dedicated to reports of ongoing projects. Chris Walzer (Vienna University of Veterinary Medicine) filled in for his absent colleague Sasan Fereidouni (Vienna University of Veterinary Medicine) and talked about their project „Wildlife Conservation and Research in Iran“. In a thought-provoking lecture, Agnes G. Loeffler (University of Wisconsin – School of Medicine and Public Health) talked about „Traditional Persian Medicine in Allopathic Practice“. To wrap up the session, Dr. Afsaneh Gächter and I presented our ongoing exchange facilitating project between Iran and Austria by presenting „The Exchange of Medical Traditional Knowledge between Austria and Iran Today“.

The last session, which was less conventional and a refreshing conclusion to a lively conference. Jaleh Lackner Gohari (MD, Internist, Former Member of Vienna Medical Faculty and Medical Officer at UN Organisations) narrated her first days as an Iranian medical student in post-was Vienna, in a heartfelt presentation „Perspective and Memory: Encounter of a Female Iranian Medical Student with Vienna in the 1950s“. The conference ended with an engaging book presentation (Normalsein ist nicht einfach: Meine Erlebnisse als Psychiater und Filmemacher) in German by Pertra Allahyari in dialogue with her father, the author, Dr. Med. Houchang Allahyari (Iranian psychiatrist, filmmaker and writer based in Vienna).
 

Figure 4: Dr. Houchang Allahyari in dialogue with his daughter Petra Allahyari (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

Vortrag von PD Dr. habil. Rainer Schreg: Rinder und Schafe – Akteure der Umweltgeschichte

Ein Beitrag von Marie-Charlotte v. Lehsten.

Am 29.6.2017 durfte das GRK Herrn PD Dr. habil. Rainer Schreg vom RGZM Mainz als Referenten begrüßen, dessen Vortrag „Rinder und Schafe – Akteure der Umweltgeschichte“ den letzten (aus terminlichen Gründen etwas nach hinten verschobenen) Teil der vom GRK im Wintersemester 2016/17 organisierten Ringvorlesung („Kunst, Kult und Konsum – Tiere in alten Kulturen“) bildete.

Herr Schreg näherte sich dem Thema sowohl von einer allgemeinen Seite her, indem er den theoretischen Hintergrund seiner Forschung und die verschiedenen Arten relevanter Quellen vorstellte, als auch konkret in Hinblick auf die Rolle der Viehwirtschaft im Rahmen der Dorfgenese im 12. und 13. Jahrhundert.

 

Perspektiven und Quellen

Geht es darum, die Rolle von Tieren in der menschlichen Gesellschaft des Mittelalters zu rekonstruieren, gilt es, eine möglichst große Bandbreite wissenschaftlicher Perspektiven (archäologisch, umwelthistorisch, ökologisch und vergleichend) zu vereinen. Da viele Aspekte in den vorhandenen Schriftquellen nicht erfasst sind, ist es nur so (unter Umständen) möglich, einen Einblick in die kulturelle Perzeption von Tieren zu erhalten: Wie nahmen die damaligen Menschen die Rolle von Tieren in ihrer Gesellschaft wahr? Beziehungsweise nahmen sie sie überhaupt wahr?

Aufschluss über diese Rolle können archäologische Befunde wie Tierknochen geben, die z.B. Artentwicklungen (etwa Züchtung hin zu mehr Größe der Rinder aus Prestigegründen) oder durch die Erstellung von Knochenspektren das Verhältnis der genutzten Tierarten zu einer bestimmten Zeit erhellen. Hinzugezogen werden müssen auch Siedlungsbefunde, die Rückschlüsse auf die menschlichen Aktivitäten in ihrem Wohnraum zulassen (aufschlussreich sind hier v.a. Phosphatanalysen), sowie Geländedenkmale, die Formen der Tierhaltung, etwa Schäfereien, anzeigen.

Mit einzubeziehen sind im Bereich der Landschaftsarchäologie Überlegungen zum Verhältnis von Vieh, Weidefläche und zu düngender Ackerfläche im Umfeld von Siedlungen, ebenso wie in ökologischer Hinsicht die Effekte, die Viehhaltung auf die Landschaftsentwicklung hatte, namentlich die Entwicklung von Heidelandschaften und Dünenmobilisierung aufgrund von Entwaldung, Überweidung und Nährstoffentzug.
 
Insgesamt bestimmten mehrere Aspekte die Rolle der Viehwirtschaft:
  • Die durch sie gewonnenen Produkte (nicht nur Nahrung, sondern z.B. auch Textilien),
  • die ökologischen Aspekte (neben der Offenhaltung von Brachland auch der sehr wichtige Faktor der Düngung),
  • die soziale Rolle der Tiere als Prestigeobjekte und Hausgenossen,
  • und schließlich die Risikofaktoren sowohl für die Landschaft (Überweidung) als auch für die Viehbesitzer direkt (Übertragung von Krankheiten, Gefahr von Viehverlusten durch Seuchen oder harte Winter).
     

    Ein Exemplar der Rinderrasse „Rätisches Grauvieh“,
    die auch im Mittelalter genutzt wurde (Photo: M.-C. v. Lehsten).

     
    Dorfgenese und Düngung

    Ein besonders bedeutsamer Aspekt bei der Rolle der Viehhaltung im Mittelalter war die Praxis des Düngens, deren Entwicklung und Auswirkungen Herr Schreg vor dem Hintergrund des Übergangs von der privaten Dreifelderwirtschaft zur dörflich organisierten Dreizelgenwirtschaft vorstellte.
    Bei der bis zum 13. Jh. in Mitteleuropa vorherrschenden Form der privaten Dreifelderwirtschaft, bei der auch die für Siedlungen genutzte Fläche aufgrund der dortigen starken Nährstoffanreicherung in die Verschiebungen der Landnutzung mit einbezogen wurde, praktizierte man noch keine gezielte Düngung der Äcker mit Viehmist. Das Anwachsen der Bevölkerung und der Verlust an nutzbarer Fläche durch die Hecken, welche weidendes Vieh von den Äckern abhielten, zugleich aber beim Wenden des Pfluges hinderlich waren, führte im 13./14. Jh. flächendeckend zum Zusammenschluss der vorher verstreuten Höfe in Dörfer. Dabei wurde das umliegende Land in Zelgen (Bewirtschaftungsblöcke) eingeteilt, für die es einen festen Nutzungsplan mit koordinierter Fruchtwechselfolge gab – vorteilhaft daran war u.a. der Landgewinn durch den Wegfall der Hecken.
    Durch die offeneren Flächen, die sich stärker aufheizten und schlechter bewässert werden konnten, und die Tatsache, dass nun nicht mehr die Äcker auf die nährstoffreichen Flächen (also ehemalige Siedlungsflächen) verlegt werden konnten, ergab sich jedoch aus der Dreizelgenwirtschaft langfristig eine Standortverschlechterung.

    Archäologische Untersuchungen belegen nun ab dem 15. Jh. das Erscheinen eines sog. „Scherbenschleiers“ auf den Äckern, der ein Indiz dafür ist, dass ab dieser Zeit systematisch Viehdung in Verbindung mit Haushaltsabfällen (daher die Scherben) auf die Felder gebracht wurde.
    Überraschend ist dabei vor allem, dass zwischen diesem Befund und dem Übergang zur Dreizelgenwirtschaft ein Zeitraum von etwa 200 Jahren, eine Art „Düngerlücke“, liegt. Auch wenn das Wissen um den Nutzen von Düngung bereits in der Antike (z.B. bei Columella) und auch im Hochmittelalter u.a. bei Walter de Henley (13. Jh.) bezeugt ist, scheint es möglich, dass dieses nur unter Gelehrten kursierte und bei den Bauern zunächst schlichtweg nicht vorhanden war. So könnte es sein, dass die veränderte Rolle von Rindern und Schafen innerhalb der Dreizelgenwirtschaft und die mangelnde Wahrnehmung der Bedeutung des Düngers mitverantwortlich war für die vielen Wüstungen und die wirtschaftliche Krise im Spätmittelalter (14. Jh.).
     

    Tiere als Akteure?

    Abschließend präsentierte Herr Schreg ein Fazit zu der Frage, inwiefern Rinder und Schafe tatsächlich als Akteure der Umweltgeschichte gesehen werden können. Obwohl sie eigentlich vom Menschen diktiert wurden und eine passive Rolle hatten (und in einer solchen auch wahrgenommen wurden), waren sie doch Teil der Hausgemeinschaften mit eigenen Bedürfnissen und beeinflussten durch ihr Verhalten den Ablauf der Siedlungsgeschichte: Jenseits von Kunst, Kult und Konsum waren die Tiere konkret für Landschaftsveränderungen mit verantwortlich.
    Eine Herausforderung bei der Untersuchung dieser Rolle bleibt aber nach wie vor der Umstand, dass die historische Bedeutung der Tiere sich jenseits der Aufmerksamkeit der schriftlichen Quellen bewegt, u.a. deshalb, weil die bäuerliche Lebenswelt in diesen nur bedingt präsent ist, aber möglicherweise auch aufgrund einer etwaigen Tabubelegung des Themas „Dung“. Die umwelthistorische Perspektive erlaubt vor diesem Hintergrund eine bestmögliche Erfassung dieser Blindstellen.

    28. Tagung des Arbeitskreises „Antike Naturwissenschaft und ihre Rezeption“ (AKAN) in Mainz

    Ein Beitrag von Mirna Kjorveziroska. 

    Am 24. Juni 2017 hat in Mainz die 28. AKAN-Tagung stattgefunden, veranstaltet von Prof. Dr. Jochen Althoff, dem stellvertretenden Sprecher des Graduiertenkollegs. Insgesamt sieben Vorträge haben ein sehr breites Spektrum an Fragestellungen behandelt, wobei durch diese thematische Offenheit der immense Skopus der antiken Naturwissenschaft sowie die Pluralität ihrer Erforschungsmöglichkeiten und deren methodische Flexibilität in aller Deutlichkeit programmatisch illustriert wurden. In der folgenden Retrospektive, die nicht die Chronologie der Tagung reproduziert, sondern auf anderen, durch die zeitliche Distanz ermöglichten aposteriorischen Dispositionsintuitionen beruht, soll jeder Vortrag in einer sprachlichen Miniatur rekapituliert werden, ohne dass auf einer strengen quantitativen Symmetrie zu insistieren ist.

    Naturkundliche Wortgeschichten

    Die Vorträge von Katharina Epstein (Freiburg) und Agata Maksymczak (Augsburg) beschäftigten sich mit Aristotelesʼ terminologischem Instrumentarium und präsentierten eine mikroskopische Analyse je einer zentralen Begrifflichkeit. Epsteins Vortrag „ἄνθρωπος und θηρίον bei Aristoteles“ war als Demontierung einer vermeintlichen Synonymie angelegt: Ausgehend von der Beobachtung, dass in der Historia animalium VIII und IX der Begriff θηρίον zur Referentialisierung von Tieren favorisiert wird, hat Epstein über die semantischen Interferenzen zwischen θηρίον und ζῷον reflektiert. Während ζῷον, ‚das Lebewesen‘, als eine abundante gemeinsame Bezeichnung für Menschen und Tiere fungiert (Pflanzen jedoch ausschließt, die nur in der Partizipialform ζῶντα mit erfasst sind), ist θηρίον ein Wort der Jagd, beziehbar auf Bestien und Raubtiere. Während ζῷον die Gemeinsamkeiten von Mensch und Tier betont, artikuliert θηρίον eine Perspektive der Alterität, eine menschliche Abgrenzung vom Tier und generiert eine Distanz zwischen dem Menschen und der animalen Aggressivität und Brutalität. Es konnte also aufgezeigt werden, dass eine lexikalische Entscheidung als Kristallisationspunkt der genauen Nuance einer Tier-Mensch-Relation lesbar ist.
    Maksymczak hat sich in ihrem Vortrag „Die aristotelische Natur ist ein Prinzip der Bewegung – doch was ist ein Prinzip?“ mit der Semantik von ἀρχή bei Aristoteles auseinandergesetzt, da eine Disambiguierung des Lexems für das Verständnis von Aristotelesʼ Naturdefinitionen in der Physik und der Metaphysik – beispielsweise „Naturbeschaffenheit ist eine Art ἀρχή und Ursache von Bewegung und Ruhe an dem Ding, dem sie im eigentlichen Sinne, an und für sich, nicht nur nebenbei, zukommt“ (Physik II 1.192 b 13–15) – unabdingbar ist.

    Lothar Willms (Heidelberg) hat in seinem Vortrag „Blei, Birke und Biber: Was die Etymologie von Wörtern der natürlichen Umwelt über die Kulturgeschichte verrät“ durch die Optik der linguistischen Paläontologie die Entwicklung ausgewählter botanischer und zoologischer Appellativa zurückverfolgt und ihre Biographie nachgezeichnet. Es handelte sich dabei um eine diachrone und diatopische Makroperspektive, die sich nicht dem terminologischen Usus und den semantischen Nuancierungen eines konkreten Autors oder Textkorpus mikroskopisch zuwandte, sondern die lautliche Karriere der selegierten Lexeme in verschiedenen Einzelsprachen und Sprachstufen überblickte, um die Entlehnungsdynamiken mit Kulturkontakten und Migrationen in Korrelation zu bringen. Die methodische Grundprämisse war also eine Instrumentalisierung etymologischer Ansätze zur Rekonstruktion kulturgeschichtlicher Formationen. Durch Eruierung keltischer Etyma konnte das Keltische als Gebersprache für diverse Ausdrücke für nordalpine Flora und Fauna in den indogermanischen Sprachen ausgewiesen werden, wodurch sich eine Kongruenz zwischen der geographischen Heimat der entlehnten Bezeichnungen und dem Verbreitungsraum der damit referentialisierten Tiere und Pflanzen postulieren ließ.

    Wolfgang Hübners (Münster) und Klaus Ruthenbergs (Coburg) Überlegungen berührten die Frage nach der Relation zwischen antiken Wissensbeständen und moderner Nomenklatur. Hübners Vortrag „Wie soll der neue Planet heißen? Antike Mythologie heute“ als Skizze zur noch zu schreibenden Kulturgeschichte der Planetenbenennung behandelte die Funktionalisierung mythologischen Wissens zur onomastischen Auszeichnung von Himmelskörpern. Dabei wurde durch die Schilderung konkurrierender Benennungssysteme und historischer nomenklatorischer Dissense die prozessuale Durchsetzung der mythologischen Namen illustriert: Paradigmatisch für eine abgewiesene Alternative der Astronomie sind beispielsweise die panegyrischen Benennungsversuche nach Herrschern, exemplifiziert an Galileos Insistenz, die neuen Jupiter-Monde als Medicea sidera zu bezeichnen. Indem sie stattdessen die Namen der Geliebten Jupiters erhielten, siegte die Mythologie über die politischen Logiken. Während man eine Glorifizierung des Entdeckers durch die Übertragung seines Namens auf den entdeckten Himmelskörper konsequent ablehnte, wurden die mythologischen Figuren verschiedentlich durch literarische Protagonisten einer Nationalliteratur als Namengeber substituiert – so tragen die ersten Uranus-Monde die Namen Titania, Oberon, Ariel, Umbriel und Miranda, wobei die Werke Alexander Popes und William Shakespeares als Namenfundus figurieren. Zugleich wurde aber auch auf die limitierte Kapazität der mythologisch imprägnierten Benennungsmöglichkeiten hingewiesen: Das Quantum an aktuell bekannten Himmelskörpern überfordert das onomastische Reservoir der Mythologie, sodass auch auf Toponyme als Namengrundlage zurückgegriffen werden muss: Man denke an die Planetoiden Marsilia, Austria, Heidelberga oder Chicago.
    Ruthenbergs Vortrag „Säuren in der Antike und Frühen Neuzeit“ konzentrierte sich seinerseits auf Platons und Aristotelesʼ Äußerungen über die Eigenschaften von Säuren sowie auf Pliniusʼ Ausführungen über den Essig als Pharmakon. Weiterverfolgt wurde dieser heute als chemisch zu bezeichnende Diskurs bis in die Frühe Neuzeit hinein, als die Säuren als Mittel zur Auflösung von Metallen für die Alchemie äußerst attraktiv waren. Die Argumentation basierte auf der Annahme, dass Säuren auch aus einer diachronen Perspektive erforscht werden können, obwohl kein terminologisches Kontinuum festzustellen ist: Die Säuren in der Antike und in der Frühen Neuzeit wurden weder mit den heutigen differenzierten Namen noch mit elaborierten chemischen Formeln versehen, aber ihre operationable Dimension, etwa die Produktion von Säuren, war durchaus bekannt. Ungeachtet der Absenz unserer heutigen Zeichensysteme zur nomenklatorischen Fixierung der Säuren lässt sich also ein Wissen über Säuren auch in alten naturkundlichen diskursiven Komplexen eruieren.

    Naturkundliche Wissensformationen und theologische Normative

    Sylvia Usener (Frankfurt) und Diego De Brasi (Marburg) erläuterten die Interaktion zwischen medizinischem bzw. zoologischem Wissen und theologischem Diskurs. Aus diesem Kontakt resultiert notwendigerweise eine Veränderung – entweder der theologischen Matrix oder der naturkundlichen Wissenssegmente. Useners Vortrag „Mit Geduld und Spucke. Jesus von Nazareth, Kaiser Vespasian und die ‚Wunder‘ der Medizin“ lagen Berichte über eine Blindenheilung nach Markus (Mk 8,22–26) sowie über die Heilung eines Blindgeborenen nach Johannes (Joh 9,1–12) zugrunde, in denen Jesus Speichel als Pharmakon verwendet und somit von dem konventionellen biblischen Therapiemodell abweicht, nur durch Berührung zu heilen. Hierdurch wird zum einen das Neue Testament auf das antike medizinische Wissen hin geöffnet, das den Speichel in zahlreichen Rezepten als bewährtes Arzneimittel empfahl, zum anderen werden aber auch Parallelen zu einer von Tacitus erzählten Geschichte über Kaiser Vespasian nahegelegt, der einmal von einem Patienten gebeten wurde, ihn mit dem Speichel zu heilen. Dabei konnte die große Konsequenz konturiert werden, dass durch die biblische Absorption pharmakologischer Praktiken aus anderen Kontexten die Bedeutung des Handauflegens als einer kanonischen kontiguitären Heilungsgeste relativiert und eine Neuinszenierung des Jesus als Pharmazeut demonstriert wird.
    De Brasis Vortrag „Der Physiologos: Ein Beispiel christlicher Umfunktionierung biologischen Wissens“ war hingegen als eine offene Frage, als ein argumentatives Fragezeichen konzipiert, wie die großen theologischen Lizenzen, der demonstrative Ermächtigungsakt der christlichen Allegorese gegenüber der zeitgenössisch korrekten Zoologie zu erklären sind. Diese Obstruktion kontemporären naturkundlichen Wissens zur leichteren Kompatibilisierung der referierten Tierbeschreibungen mit der intendierten allegorischen Auslegung wurde unter anderem am Physiologos-Lemma ‚Wiesel‘ illustriert. Trotz der in der Antike reichlich überlieferten Ansicht, dass das Wiesel durch den Mund gebäre, wird im Physiologos die anatomische Basis dieses Fortpflanzungsprozesses chiastisch invertiert: Dort empfängt das Wiesel durch den Mund, gebiert durch das Ohr und lässt sich dementsprechend mit unfrommen Christen analogisieren, die das geistliche Brot in der Kirche essen, das Wort des Herrn aber sogleich wieder aus ihren Ohren herauswerfen. In diesem Zusammenhang wurde auch die Frage nach den Rezeptionsmodalitäten und dem Profil der Zielgruppe des Physiologos aufgeworfen, die solche Wissenskorruptionen (un-)wissentlich akzeptiert und toleriert hat.

    Portrait of a Lady. ‚Real‘ women, ‚imagined‘ women and the development of female representation in Prehistoric Cyprus. A Lecture by Prof. Luca Bombardieri

    A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

    The research on the ancient concepts of human body holds an important place within the context of Graduiertenkolleg 1876, and it is in this light that on June 22nd 2017, Prof Luca Bombardieri, of the University of Turin, was invited as guest speaker for his expertise on Prehistoric female representations in Eastern Mediterranean cultures.

    According to legend, it was from the clear waters of the island of Cyprus – precisely on the beach of Petra tou Romiou (Fig. 1) – that Aphrodite emerged. From Greek times to now, this association has been embedded into the collective imagination, but has it always been so? Was there something special about the way women were represented in Cyprus before they took the shape and features of the Aphrodite we all know?

    Figure 1. Petra tou Romiou, the legendary birthplace of Aphrodite in Cyprus (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
    Following a thread that starts around 4500 BC, Prof Luca Bombardieri’s lecture navigated through the many facets of the female figure in Cypriot Pre- and Protohistory, to find out whether this was indeed the „birthplace“ of the Goddess of Love. And, as often happens when dealing with ancient art, this paper posed the question to what degree these figures represent real women, ideals or deities.

    The journey begins in the Chalcolithic settlement of Kissonerga Mosphilia with the discovery under a circular building of a foundation deposit. In a round basin together with a triton shell and pebble stones, a series of female figurines was unearthed. All of these appeared to be related to pregnancy, most of them showing large hips and bellies, some being supported by a stool, and finally, the figurine of a woman in the act of giving birth (Fig. 2). The connection between motherhood and women is an obvious one, but in Cypriot culture this appears to be stressed with particular fervour. 

    

    Figure 2. Birth-giving terracotta figurine from the ritual deposit at Kissonerga Mosphilia. The Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).

    In the following Early and Middle Bronze Age periods, we see a radical change in the ceramic traditions, economic practices and art. But the female representations, however stylistically different from the previous Chalcolithic, repeat the same motifs. In this period, whole village-life scenes decorate ceramic vessels in the form of plastic appliques. The agricultural revolution set in motion by the introduction of cattle-drawn plough is often reflected in these scenes, together with a set of activities related to the increased field productivity. And yet, in the midst of all these innovations, the woman-mother figure keeps her centrality (Fig. 3). The role that gender has in the separation of activities is not yet clear. On one hand, certain occupations, such as ploughing the fields, appear to be a male prerogative. But among the many activities represented in these scenes, most are performed by gender-neutral characters. Parallels from later periods seem to suggest that at least some of them – such as grinding flour or bread making – might have been denoted as traditionally feminine, but there is no definitive answer to the matter. 
     
    Figure 3. Early Bronze Age jar with plastic decoration of a village-scene. At the centre, a woman holding an infant. The Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
    At the end of the Early Cypriot a new type of statuette is introduced: the so-called Plank-shaped Figurine (Fig. 4) and its production would continue during the whole Middle Cypriot. The ones representing women multiply and a new element makes its appearance: the infant is no longer simply held in its mother’s arms, but is now always associated with a cradle. This association between motherhood and cradle is such that in two instances the cradle itself becomes a metaphor of the mother, with stylised arms holding the baby in place.
     
    Figure 4. Plank shaped figurines at the Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
    Although women are consistently depicted throughout Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze Age art, nothing suggests that these figures represent anything more than their role in prehistoric village communities. The matter concerning the plank-shaped figurines is more complicated. It is possible that these figurines were miniature versions of larger, wooden idols placed in sanctuaries, for which there are archaeological parallels in the Greek islands. Should that be the case, these may represent something more than real-life women, and may be closer to the representation of an idealised feminine, often maternal deity.

    In the Late Bronze Age, we see a new influx of ideas and traditions from the Levant and the Aegean, and this is particularly evident in the coroplastic. The „bird-faced“ figurines, clearly show the stylistic influence of their Levantine counterparts, but again, the maternity element is central to the Cypriot versions (Fig. 5). As for the ones of Aegean inspiration, the raised arms and considering the fact that several of these figurines were found in sanctuary precincts, it seems plausible that they were ritually connotated, if not having been representations of deities themselves. 

     
    Figure 5. Terracotta figurine of a woman with a child. The BritishMuseum, registry number 1897.0401.1087.
    The one case where it is commonly agreed that such a female figurine does indeed represent a goddess is the Astarte on the Ingot (Fig. 6). The iconography is typical of the Levantine goddess, and it is generally assumed that here too, it represents a local variant of the fertility goddess that in later times developed into the Cypriot Aphrodite. The association of Astarte with metalwork has some interesting connections with the Greek myth and may further explain the appearance of the cult of Aphrodite on the island. Curiously, Homer narrates in the Odyssey that Aphrodite was married to the god of metallurgy, Hephaistos.
    Figure 6. Bronze figurine of Astarte on the Ingot. Ashmolean Museum, registry number AN1971.888.
    If the passage from Asterte on the Ingot to Aphrodite is relatively easy, more complex is to establish a direct correlation between this Astarte-Aphrodite and the millennia old Cypriot tradition of representations of women and maternity. Indeed, fertility may constitute such point of contact, but the gap between these two ideas of women is still open. The one thing that is certain is the centrality – either real, imagined or deified – of women and mothers throughout the entirety of Cypriot art history.

    If you are interested, here you’ll find some suggestions for further reading:

    Diane Bolger (Ed.), A Companion to Gender Prehistory (Chichester, England: Wiley Blackwell), 2013.
    Luca Bombardieri, Tommaso Braccini and Silvia Romani (Eds.), Il Trono Variopinto. Figure e Forme della Dea dell’Amore (Edizioni dell’Orso: Roma), 2014.
    Stephanie Budin, „Girl, woman, mother, goddess: Bronze Age Cypriot terracotta figurines“ in Medelhavsmuseet: Focus on the Mediterranean, Vol. 5, 2009.

    Portrait of a Lady. ‚Real‘ women, ‚imagined‘ women and the development of female representation in Prehistoric Cyprus. A Lecture by Prof. Luca Bombardieri

    A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

    The research on the ancient concepts of human body holds an important place within the context of Graduiertenkolleg 1876, and it is in this light that on June 22nd 2017, Prof Luca Bombardieri, of the University of Turin, was invited as guest speaker for his expertise on Prehistoric female representations in Eastern Mediterranean cultures.

    According to legend, it was from the clear waters of the island of Cyprus – precisely on the beach of Petra tou Romiou (Fig. 1) – that Aphrodite emerged. From Greek times to now, this association has been embedded into the collective imagination, but has it always been so? Was there something special about the way women were represented in Cyprus before they took the shape and features of the Aphrodite we all know?

    Figure 1. Petra tou Romiou, the legendary birthplace of Aphrodite in Cyprus (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
    Following a thread that starts around 4500 BC, Prof Luca Bombardieri’s lecture navigated through the many facets of the female figure in Cypriot Pre- and Protohistory, to find out whether this was indeed the „birthplace“ of the Goddess of Love. And, as often happens when dealing with ancient art, this paper posed the question to what degree these figures represent real women, ideals or deities.

    The journey begins in the Chalcolithic settlement of Kissonerga Mosphilia with the discovery under a circular building of a foundation deposit. In a round basin together with a triton shell and pebble stones, a series of female figurines was unearthed. All of these appeared to be related to pregnancy, most of them showing large hips and bellies, some being supported by a stool, and finally, the figurine of a woman in the act of giving birth (Fig. 2). The connection between motherhood and women is an obvious one, but in Cypriot culture this appears to be stressed with particular fervour. 

    

    Figure 2. Birth-giving terracotta figurine from the ritual deposit at Kissonerga Mosphilia. The Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).

    In the following Early and Middle Bronze Age periods, we see a radical change in the ceramic traditions, economic practices and art. But the female representations, however stylistically different from the previous Chalcolithic, repeat the same motifs. In this period, whole village-life scenes decorate ceramic vessels in the form of plastic appliques. The agricultural revolution set in motion by the introduction of cattle-drawn plough is often reflected in these scenes, together with a set of activities related to the increased field productivity. And yet, in the midst of all these innovations, the woman-mother figure keeps her centrality (Fig. 3). The role that gender has in the separation of activities is not yet clear. On one hand, certain occupations, such as ploughing the fields, appear to be a male prerogative. But among the many activities represented in these scenes, most are performed by gender-neutral characters. Parallels from later periods seem to suggest that at least some of them – such as grinding flour or bread making – might have been denoted as traditionally feminine, but there is no definitive answer to the matter. 
     
    Figure 3. Early Bronze Age jar with plastic decoration of a village-scene. At the centre, a woman holding an infant. The Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
    At the end of the Early Cypriot a new type of statuette is introduced: the so-called Plank-shaped Figurine (Fig. 4) and its production would continue during the whole Middle Cypriot. The ones representing women multiply and a new element makes its appearance: the infant is no longer simply held in its mother’s arms, but is now always associated with a cradle. This association between motherhood and cradle is such that in two instances the cradle itself becomes a metaphor of the mother, with stylised arms holding the baby in place.
     
    Figure 4. Plank shaped figurines at the Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
    Although women are consistently depicted throughout Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze Age art, nothing suggests that these figures represent anything more than their role in prehistoric village communities. The matter concerning the plank-shaped figurines is more complicated. It is possible that these figurines were miniature versions of larger, wooden idols placed in sanctuaries, for which there are archaeological parallels in the Greek islands. Should that be the case, these may represent something more than real-life women, and may be closer to the representation of an idealised feminine, often maternal deity.

    In the Late Bronze Age, we see a new influx of ideas and traditions from the Levant and the Aegean, and this is particularly evident in the coroplastic. The „bird-faced“ figurines, clearly show the stylistic influence of their Levantine counterparts, but again, the maternity element is central to the Cypriot versions (Fig. 5). As for the ones of Aegean inspiration, the raised arms and considering the fact that several of these figurines were found in sanctuary precincts, it seems plausible that they were ritually connotated, if not having been representations of deities themselves. 

     
    Figure 5. Terracotta figurine of a woman with a child. The BritishMuseum, registry number 1897.0401.1087.
    The one case where it is commonly agreed that such a female figurine does indeed represent a goddess is the Astarte on the Ingot (Fig. 6). The iconography is typical of the Levantine goddess, and it is generally assumed that here too, it represents a local variant of the fertility goddess that in later times developed into the Cypriot Aphrodite. The association of Astarte with metalwork has some interesting connections with the Greek myth and may further explain the appearance of the cult of Aphrodite on the island. Curiously, Homer narrates in the Odyssey that Aphrodite was married to the god of metallurgy, Hephaistos.
    Figure 6. Bronze figurine of Astarte on the Ingot. Ashmolean Museum, registry number AN1971.888.
    If the passage from Asterte on the Ingot to Aphrodite is relatively easy, more complex is to establish a direct correlation between this Astarte-Aphrodite and the millennia old Cypriot tradition of representations of women and maternity. Indeed, fertility may constitute such point of contact, but the gap between these two ideas of women is still open. The one thing that is certain is the centrality – either real, imagined or deified – of women and mothers throughout the entirety of Cypriot art history.

    If you are interested, here you’ll find some suggestions for further reading:

    Diane Bolger (Ed.), A Companion to Gender Prehistory (Chichester, England: Wiley Blackwell), 2013.
    Luca Bombardieri, Tommaso Braccini and Silvia Romani (Eds.), Il Trono Variopinto. Figure e Forme della Dea dell’Amore (Edizioni dell’Orso: Roma), 2014.
    Stephanie Budin, „Girl, woman, mother, goddess: Bronze Age Cypriot terracotta figurines“ in Medelhavsmuseet: Focus on the Mediterranean, Vol. 5, 2009.

    „Kulturgüterschutz – Bewusstsein für unser gemeinsames Erbe“ SIAA Studierendenkonferenz, 10.-11.06.2017 (Mainz)

    Ein Beitrag von Katharina Zartner.

    Am Wochenende des 10. und 11. Juni 2017 fand in Mainz erstmals die interdisziplinäre SIAA Studierendenkonferenz unter dem Titel „Kulturgüterschutz – Bewusstsein für unser gemeinsames Erbe“ statt. Ein Thema, das aktueller nicht sein könnte und das vor allem im Bereich der Altertumswissenschaften eine große Rolle spielt. Die Konferenz fügte sich mit ihrer Thematik in die global angelegte Kampagne „unite4heritage“ der Unesco ein und leistete somit auch einen wertvollen Beitrag zu dem wichtigen Vorhaben, Menschen weltweit für das Thema Kulturgüterschutz zu sensibilisieren.

    Abb. 1: Das Logo der „Studierendenkonferenz Innovative und Aktive Altertumswissenschaften Mainz“ (kurz SIAA). In der Mitte ist eine altägyptische Hieroglyphe zu sehen; diese trägt den Lautwert siA, was sich mit „Erkenntnis“ oder „Bewusstsein“ übersetzen lässt und den Grundgedanken des Kulturgüterschutzes versinnbildlichen soll.

    Innovative Ideen und viel persönlicher Einsatz

    Das Kürzel SIAA steht für „Studierendenkonferenz Innovative und Aktive Altertumswissenschaften Mainz“ (Abb. 1) und in eben diesem Sinne war die Konferenz auch gestaltet. Mit viel Herzblut haben zwei Masterstudentinnen sowie eine ehemalige Studentin mit abgeschlossenem Master aus dem Arbeitsbereich Ägyptologie des Instituts für Altertumswissenschaften der JGU Mainz die Konferenz geplant, organisiert und durchgeführt: Peggy Zogbaum, Isabel Steinhardt und Dana Jacoby. Den drei Organisatorinnen ist es zu verdanken, dass die Konferenz überhaupt zu Stande kam, professionell vorbereitet war und zu einem derartigen Erfolg wurde. Ein Jahr Vorbereitungszeit haben die drei jungen Frauen investiert, selbständig Gelder eingeworben, eine Website und Werbematerialien erstellt, Referenten eingeladen, das Programm zusammengestellt, für die Verpflegung der Teilnehmer gesorgt und vieles mehr. Das alles neben Studium und Beruf zu stemmen ist eine beachtliche Leistung.
    Tag 1 der Konferenz begann mit den Grußworten von Univ.-Prof. Dr. Klaus Pietschmann (Prodekan des Fachbereichs 07 der JGU Mainz) und Univ.-Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening (Professorin der Ägyptologie am Institut für Altertumswissenschaften und Sprecherin des Graduiertenkollegs „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“), die die Aktualität und Brisanz der Thematik betonten und besonders die Eigeninitiative der Organisatorinnen herausstellten, sowie mit einer thematischen Einführung durch Univ.-Prof. Dr. Alexander Pruß (Professor für Vorderasiatische Archäologie am Institut für Altertumswissenschaften).

    Kulturgüterschutz in Libyen und Ägypten

    Den ersten Vortrag der Konferenz hielt Dr. Julia Nikolaus von der Universität Leicester bzw. Oxford zum Thema „Libyan Antiquities at Risk“ und berichtete über die Problematiken des illegalen Antikenhandels und der Zerstörung von Kulturgütern in Libyen. So werden antike Friedhöfe zerstört, indem sie rücksichtslos mit Straßen und Häusern überbaut werden; Reliefs und Statuen werden von Grabbauten abgeschlagen und landen auf dem Antikenmarkt. Frau Dr. Nikolaus und ihr Team bemühen sich um Aufklärung und Sensibilisierung sowohl der Antikenhändler als auch der lokalen Bevölkerung, um vor allem bei den jüngeren Generationen ein Bewusstsein für das kulturelle Erbe des Landes zu schaffen. Dies geschieht auf vorbildliche Weise in enger Zusammenarbeit mit den örtlichen Behörden. 
    Im Anschluss daran referierte Hannah Sonbol, M.A. von der Freien Universität Berlin zum „Beitrag ägyptischer staatlicher Schulbücher zum Kulturgüterschutz“. Anhand von Beispielen aus den Büchern, die zur Pflichtlektüre eines jeden ägyptischen Schülers gehören, zeigte sie eindrücklich, dass das Thema Kulturgüterschutz nur im Licht wirtschaftlicher Interessen vermittelt wird. Die einzigartige Geschichte des Landes und die frühe ägyptische Hochkultur werden in hohem Maße instrumentalisiert und zur Militärverherrlichung genutzt; die Meinungsrichtung wird den Schülern in der Regel bereits durch die Formulierung der Fragen vorgegeben. Was fehlt, ist die Vermittlung von neutralem Wissen und das Bewusstsein für den kulturhistorischen Wert dieser Denkmäler. Als positives Beispiel für Aufklärungsarbeit dieser Art nannte Frau Sonbol die „Abteilung zur Kulturvermittlung und für Archäologie-Bewusstsein“ in Alexandrien, machte jedoch gleichzeitig deutlich, dass solche Projekte bisher leider die Ausnahme darstellen.

    Aus der Sicht von Justitia

    Im ersten Keynote-Vortrag beleuchtete Prof. Dr. Dr. hc. Kai Ambos aus Göttingen die Frage, ob und inwiefern das Völkerstrafrecht einen Beitrag zum Kulturgüterschutz leisten kann. Es wurde deutlich, dass die Rechtslage oft bei weitem nicht eindeutig ist, bspw. in der Frage, wann in Kriegszeiten die „militärische Notwendigkeit“ besteht, ein Kulturdenkmal zu zerstören oder nicht. So bleibt es nach einer solchen Zerstörung u.a. auch Ermessenssache, ob eine ausreichende „Schwere der Tat“ vorlag, die eine Verurteilung rechtfertigen würde. Als eine Art Präzedenzfall führte er die erstmalige strafrechtliche Verurteilung einer Person für die Zerstörung von Kulturgütern im Jahr 2016 an (sog. Al-Mahdi-Fall).

    Parallelen zwischen Natur- und Kulturgüterschutz?!

    Nach ausgiebiger Stärkung in der Mittagspause zog Jens Crueger, B.A. von der Universität Bremen interessante Parallelen zwischen Überlegungen aus dem Bereich des Natur-, Arten- und Tierschutzes und dem Feld des Kulturgüterschutzes. Vor allem im Hinblick auf das Stichwort Zukunftsbewusstsein und Sensibilisierung ist der Natur- und Umweltschutz in den letzten Jahrzehnten ein großes Stück vorangekommen und kann somit vielleicht als Orientierungshilfe im Prozess der Bewusstseinsbildung für die Notwendigkeit von Kulturgüterschutz dienen. 

    Untrennbar verbunden: Archäologie und Kulturgüterschutz 

    Auch das Graduiertenkolleg 1876 „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ war durch drei Doktorandinnen der Ägyptologie bzw. der Vorderasiatischen Archäologie mit einem Vortrag vertreten (Abb. 2). Unter dem Titel „Kulturgüterschutz im Archäologen-Alltag – Im Spannungsfeld zwischen Dokumentation, Erhaltung und Zerstörung“ gaben Sonja Speck, Mari Yamasaki und Katharina Zartner Einblicke in die tägliche Arbeit von Archäolog*innen und inwiefern der Kulturgüterschutz dabei eine Rolle spielt. In einem einführenden Teil ging Katharina Zartner darauf ein, inwiefern archäologisches Arbeiten immer auch mit Zerstörung (durch die Ausgrabungstätigkeit) verbunden ist und wie wichtig es daher ist, jeden Arbeitsschritt und jede kleinste Information gründlich zu dokumentieren, um so die Nachvollziehbarkeit von Erkenntnissen, die Erhaltung von Wissen und die Möglichkeit zur Rekonstruktion zu gewährleisten. Als Fallbeispiele für modernes archäologisches Arbeiten mit dem Fokus auf ebendiesen Zielen diente zum einen der Bericht von Mari Yamasaki über ein Land- und Unterwassersurvey auf Zypern (Agios Georgios Bay), bei dem Methoden wie Remote Sensing, Georadar und Geomagnetik zum Einsatz kommen und auf diese Weise große Areale zerstörungsfrei, zeitsparend und kostengünstig untersucht werden können. Zum anderen stellte Sonja Speck die Vorteile der 3D-Rekonstruktion von archäologischen Objekten mittels Photogrammetrie vor – speziell anhand eines von ihr mitentwickelten Geräts, das den Prozess der Fotoaufnahmen, z.B. von Siegeln oder Statuetten, standardisiert und erleichtert.

    Abb. 2: Die GRK-Doktorandinnen Mari Yamasaki, Sonja Speck und Katharina Zartner werden von den Organisatorinnen Peggy Zogbaum und Dana Jacoby (v.l.n.r.) zu ihrem Vortrag zum „Kulturgüterschutz im Archäologen-Alltag“ begrüßt (Foto: Garzón Rodríguez).

    Schatzsucher und Antikenhändler

    Kriminalhauptkommissar Eckhard Laufer von der Abteilung für Kulturgüterschutz des Hessischen Landeskriminalamtes Wiesbaden hielt das Auditorium im spannenden zweiten Keynote-Vortrag mit dem Titel „Plündern und verkaufen, alles ’no problem‘?“ in Atem. Er erzählte aus seinem Arbeitsalltag, berichtete von Schatzsuchern und Sondengängern und bemängelte, dass die Strafen für Raubgräber und Hehler oft verschwindend gering ausfallen (als Beispiel nannte er den bekannten Fall der sog. Himmelsscheibe von Nebra). Herr Laufer erläuterte zudem den gesetzeskonformen Umgang mit archäologischen Funden und dass wohl kaum einer Privatperson bewusst sei, dass eine Meldepflicht auch für Objekte von privatem Grundbesitz besteht.
    Der folgende dritte Keynote-Vortrag von Dr. Michael Müller-Karpe vom RGZM Mainz schloss sich thematisch direkt daran an. Unter dem Titel „Blutige Antiken: Von Raubgräbern, Hehlern – und Gesetzgebern“ machte er auf die Problematiken von Raubgrabungen „im großen Stil“ aufmerksam, wie sie unter anderem von der terroristischen Organisation „Islamischer Staat“ betrieben werden. Das Hauptproblem: Die Nachfrage bestimmt das Angebot – und traurigerweise besteht die Nachfrage bei reichen Sammlern aus aller Welt, wie die enormen Summen beweisen, die Antiken in den Auktionshäusern erzielen. Dr. Müller-Karpe sprach von einem „blutigen Markt“, der Terror und Krieg mit finanziellen Mitteln versorgt und forderte zu Recht umfassende Gesetzesänderungen, um dies zu stoppen.
    Die Vorträge des ersten Tages haben alle deutlich gezeigt, dass an vielen Stellen Handlungsbedarf besteht. Bei der abschließenden Podiumsdiskussion waren sich Sprecher und Auditorium einig: Vor allem Öffentlichkeits- und Aufklärungsarbeit sowie eine allgemeine Sensibilisierung für das Thema Kulturgüterschutz sind dringend notwendig!

    Bewusstsein schaffen – Beispiele aus der Praxis

    Der zweite Tag der Konferenz war Beispielen aus der praktischen Arbeit gewidmet: Dr. Anna M. Kaiser vom Zentrum für Kulturgüterschutz der Donau-Universität Krems in Österreich berichtete von der erfolgreichen Durchführung einer Sommeruniversität, bei der ein Notfallplan zur Evakuierung von Kulturgütern erarbeitet und erfolgreich getestet wurde (z.B. für Museen im Falle einer Hochwasserkatastrophe). Ein weiteres Projekt zum Umgang mit Archiven in Krisensituationen ist geplant.

    Anne Riedel, M.A. von der Ruhr-Universität Bochum sprach über „Denkmalrecht und Kulturgüterschutz – Ein Praxisbericht über interdisziplinäre Ansätze in der universitären Lehre“. In ihrem Vortrag berichtete sie über ein über mehrere Jahre hinweg weiterentwickeltes Unterrichtskonzept, das sich anhand von Fallbeispielen unter anderem mit den rechtlichen Grundlagen von Kulturgüterschutz beschäftigt, und über Chancen, Grenzen und die Notwendigkeit der Vermittlung solchen Wissens innerhalb verschiedener Studiengänge.

    Margrith Kruip, M.A. vom Projekt HerA (Heritage Advisors, Beratung für Kulturgüterschutz Berlin) stellte mit viel Herzblut ihre Überlegungen zur „Grundlagenarbeit für den Kulturgüterschutz – Ideen für Fortbildung und Lehre“ vor. Ziel des jungen Teams ist ein verstärktes Bewusstsein für unser kulturelles Erbe und eine erhöhte Sensibilität für den Kulturgüterschutz in der Bevölkerung. Um dies zu erreichen bietet HerA Workshops und Vorträge zu verschiedenen Themenkomplexen und für verschiedene Zielgruppen an (z.B. für Polizei- und Zollbeamte, für Juristen, aber auch speziell für Studierende).

    Raum für angeregte Diskussionen und neue Kontakte

    Die beiden sog. Active Sessions boten dann noch einmal allen Konferenzbesuchern die Möglichkeit, ausgewählte Themen aus verschiedenen Blickwinkeln heraus zu diskutieren. So wurde im ersten Szenario die Frage in den Raum gestellt, ob man als Kurator eines großen Museums ein einzigartiges Objekt, dessen Provenienz allerdings ungeklärt ist, ankaufen würde oder nicht. Im zweiten Szenario fungierte das Auditorium als eine Gruppe von Richtern, die in einer imaginären „Gerichtsverhandlung“ den Fall des sog. Pyramidenkletterers von Giza verhandelten.

    Den Abschluss der zweitägigen Konferenz bildete ein Sommerfest mit leckerem Essen, Getränken und der Möglichkeit, weiter ins Gespräch zu kommen. Dabei wurde deutlich, wie viel sich zum vielschichtigen und komplexen Thema Kulturgüterschutz noch sagen lässt, was es noch alles zu tun gibt und welch weiter Weg noch vor allen liegt, die sich für unser kulturelles Erbe einsetzen. Einen wichtigen und großen ersten Schritt auf diesem Weg hat die SIAA Konferenz bereits gemacht! Sie hat interessierte Leute aus verschiedenen Disziplinen zusammengebracht und so den Grundstein für eine künftige Zusammenarbeit und gemeinsame Projekte gelegt. Den drei Organisatorinnen sei an dieser Stelle noch einmal herzlich für ihren vorbildlichen Einsatz gedankt und zu einer rundum gelungenen, interessanten, aktuellen, professionellen und innovativen Veranstaltung gratuliert!

    A Report of the First International Conference on Historical Medical Discourse, Milan

    A weblog entry by Shahrzad Irannejad.

    From June 14th to the 16th, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the University of Milan hosted the First International Conference on Historical Medical Discourse (CHIMED-1). The general interest of the conference concerned medical discourse in historical perspective across disciplinary fields and research areas, such as: historical linguistics; historical lexicology and lexicography; medicine in/and literature; history of science, medicine and medical thought; history and social function of medical institutions; popularization of medical thought; translation of medical texts; medicine and cultural attitudes; and medicine and society. I used this opportunity to share with experts how I am integrating Translation Theory and Historical Semantics in my PhD project and receive feedback. As there were parallel presentations and some presentations were in Italian (which I, unfortunately, do not speak), this report is by no means a comprehensive report of the entire event; rather, a report of the presentations I personally found relevant to my work.
    

    Figure 1: Giuliana Garzone and Paola Catenaccio presenting their paper in a panel chaired by Dr. Elisabetta Lonati in the Napoleonica hall of the University of Milan (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

    On the first day, Giuliana Garzone and Paola Catenaccio (Milan) talked about „Disseminating medical knowledge in the 19th century: discourse analytical perspectives“ (Fig. 1). They discussed the frequency of occurrence, collocation and concordances of their selected terms „knowledge“, „experience“, „theory“, and „evidence“ in their corpus, which was based on three major medical texts in the 19th century. They also discussed the structures of the three texts and stressed the importance of analyzing the introductions of the texts. Eleonora Ravizza (Bergamo) discussed „Colonialism and cultural hybridity at the intersection of medical and literary discourse“. The underlying theme of her presentation was the notion that our experience of our physical body is mediated through language and is thus socially and culturally charged. She also discussed the relationship between disease and foreignness and drew on Susan Sontag’s Illness as Metaphor. The first day ended in a very interesting social event, in which we visited the archives of the Ca‘ Granda Hospital which housed many medical documents and objects going as far back as the 11th century (Fig. 2 and 3).

     

    
    Figure 2 and 3: Visit to the archives of the Ca‘ Granda Hospital (Photos by Shahrzad Irannejad).

    
    In day two of the conference, Lucia Berti (Milan) presented her paper entitled „Italy and the Royal Society: medical papers in the early Philosophical Transactions“ based on her current PhD project. After introducing the Philosophical Transactions as important sources for the study of Anglo-Italian relations in the 17th century and after some theoretical background regarding her approaches to text analysis, she analyzed 23 medical papers written between 1665-1706, and discussed their language, genre, subject area, structure, and linguistic features. Elisabetta Lonati (Milan) talked about „Diffusing medical knowledge among the people: the socio-cultural function of medical writing“. She examined the introduction of her primary sources and went on to discuss the attitude in the sources towards the relationship between intelligibility of medical texts and their utility. Tatiana Canziani and Marianna Lya Zummo (Palermo) presented their paper entitled „Prefaces in medical dictionaries: from moves to rhetorical Analysis“. They dissected eleven medical dictionaries published 1809-1900 and discussed the rhetorical structure of their prefaces and introductions. Based on the audiences presumed for these dictionaries, they discussed the socio-cultural practices and assumptions embedded in these texts.
     
    Massimo Sturiale (Catania) talked about „Pronouncing medical terms: norm and usage in pronouncing dictionaries“. Focusing on four main pronouncing dictionaries from the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, he discussed and compared various examples of stress placement, spelling and pronunciations presented in these dictionaries. Alessandra Vicentini (Insubria) presented „A brief history of 19th-century English medical lexicography: authors, editors and texts“. After giving some background about the scientific context of these dictionaries, in which she discussed the dramatic increase in specialized terminology which necessitated the publishing of dictionaries, she analyzed the needs, motivations and actors involved in compilation of five major dictionaries compiled in the 19th century.

    In an attempt to implement one of the suggestions raised in our previous workshop on delivering public speeches in English at our RTG, I began my presentation with a story; especially because I was the last presenter in a long conference day: I had found mention of the theory of Inner Senses and Ventricular Localization in one of the stories of One Thousand and One Nights, recounted by Shahrazad the legendary storyteller. I think you can imagine my excitement as I came across this story. I received good feedback after my presentation (Fig. 4); members of the audience saying how the story helped them find relevance to my presentation and my research. I took as my departure point an 18th century Persian medical encyclopedia which mentions the theory of the Inner Senses. I then went back in time and showed how the expansion and development in the Aristotelian concepts of phantasia and koine aisthesis yielded the five inner senses described in this text. Using Historical Semantics and Translation Theory, I tried to show how transliteration, calque and translation of Greek terms yielded the Arabic, and later Persian, terminology that explained sensation, cognition and its impairment in the pre-modern Persianate world.


    

    Figure 4:  The last speaker of the day trying to allure the audience with a story by Shahrazad; I promise my gesture in this scene was not pre-contemplated (Photo by Lucia Berti).

    

    On the third day, Silvia Demo (Padova) talked about reception of Galen in Nicholas Culpeper’s work in her talk „What medicine is. Galens Art of Physick“. She presented and analyzed Culpeper’s translation of Galen’s famous book. She drew attention to the fact that Culpeper inserts his own comments in the translation, and that he adjusts some recipes based on the ingredients available to his English reader. In a quite engaging presentation, Paul-Arthur Tortosa (Florence) talked about „Tables and Content: the writing practices of French military doctors between case-study and arithmetic medicine, 1792-1800“. He introduced two major texts that explicitly discussed the emergence of the medical discourse, namely, Michel Foucault’s The Birth of the Clinic (1963) and Erwin Heinz Ackerknecht’s Medicine at the Paris Hospital, 1794-1848 (1967). His talk circled around the notion that medical lists and tables emerging in the 18th century made medicine look more „rational“. He discussed how massification of warfare in this century caused reconfiguration of medical writing practices.

    In the end, organizers of the conference Prof. Giovanni Iamartino and Dr. Elisabetta Lonati concluded the event by thanking all those involved in organizing the event, especially Lucia Berti, PhD candidate at the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature. They concluded by saying that they hope that the Conference on Historical Medical Discourse would continue to be held in the future. There is a prospect of this happening biannually, in Helsinki and Canary Islands in the near future. I, too, hope this future would soon be realized. 

     

    Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Mari Yamasaki: „Concepts of Seascapes and Marine Fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age“

    Ein Beitrag von Katharina Zartner.
     
    Am 01. Juni 2017 hat unsere Kollegin Mari Yamasaki ihr im letzten Herbst begonnenes Dissertationsprojekt mit dem Titel „Evolving concepts of seascapes and marine fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Bronze Age“ im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des Graduiertenkollegs vorgestellt. Sowohl den Professor*innen des Trägerkreises als auch den anderen Kollegiat*innen gewährte sie dabei interessante Einblicke in den aktuellen Stand ihrer Arbeit, ihre Methodik sowie in das weitere geplante Vorgehen und die Ziele des Dissertationsvorhabens.
     

    Fragestellungen und Zielsetzung

    Direkt zu Beginn ihres Vortrages nahm Mari Yamasaki eine mögliche kritische Frage vorweg: Warum ist es überhaupt gerechtfertigt, noch einmal zu „seascapes“ zu arbeiten, wurde das Thema doch in letzter Zeit in zahlreichen Untersuchungen bearbeitet? Doch gerade die Beschäftigung mit diesen neueren Abhandlungen macht nicht nur deutlich, welche Fortschritte in den letzten Jahrzehnten erzielt wurden, sondern auch, dass noch Lücken innerhalb dieses Forschungsfeldes bestehen. Daher wirft Mari Yamasaki in ihrem Dissertationsprojekt teils grundlegende und bisher unbeantwortete, teils weiterführende und teils gänzliche neue Fragen auf, so zum Beispiel:
     
    Was ist überhaupt eine Küste? Diese Frage ist bei weitem nicht so simpel zu beantworten, wie es im ersten Moment vielleicht scheinen mag. Zunächst müssen Kriterien herausgearbeitet werden, die entsprechend der antiken Weltsicht charakteristisch für eine Küste sind und an denen sich somit ein entsprechendes zugrunde liegendes Konzept festmachen lässt. Um solche Kriterien zu definieren, muss die Frage gestellt werden, wie die Landschaft entlang der Küste und das Meer selbst von den Menschen, die dort lebten, wahrgenommen wurden und wie diese mit und in ihrer Umwelt (inter-)agierten. Besonders das Eingreifen in die maritime Landschaft sowie die Nutzung und Ausbeutung von Ressourcen und lokaler Fauna stehen dabei im Fokus. Der geographische Rahmen dieser Untersuchung wird durch jene Staaten und Gesellschaften abgesteckt, die während der Bronzezeit (ca. 2500–1000 v. Chr., mit Fokus auf dem 2. Jt. v. Chr.) direkt am Handel im östlichen Mittelmeerraum beteiligt waren: Ägypten, das Reich von Hatti, der mykenische Kulturkreis sowie die Stadtstaaten entlang der Levante-Küste. In den Blick genommen werden dabei insbesondere die Küstensiedlungen, die eine entscheidende Rolle bei der Entstehung dieses (Handels-)Netzwerkes spielten. Welche Beziehungen bestanden zwischen diesen Siedlungen untereinander, welche Art von Austausch fand zwischen ihnen statt und inwiefern fungierten sie als Vermittler gegenüber dem Landesinneren? Schließlich stellt sich natürlich die wohl wichtigste Frage: Wie lässt sich all das im archäologischen Befund fassen?

     

    Ein rätselhafter Fisch – Die Materialgrundlage

    Die zuletzt gestellte Frage leitet direkt über zur Materialgrundlage: Welche Quellen können zur Beantwortung der aufgeworfenen Fragen herangezogen werden? Mari Yamasaki wertet für ihre Untersuchung verschiedene Materialgruppen aus: zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, bildliche Darstellungen sowie Schriftquellen. Im aktuellen Stadium der Arbeit setzt sie sich verstärkt mit den ersten beiden Gattungen auseinander, während die beiden letztgenannten zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt ausgewertet werden sollen.
     
    Das zooarchäologische Material, d.h. die in archäologischen Kontexten erhaltenen Überreste der antiken Fauna, setzt sich im Bereich der Küstensiedlungen v.a. aus Fischknochen, Muscheln und Überresten der sog. Murex-Schnecken, aus deren Sekret man in der Antike Purpur als Färbemittel gewann, zusammen. Die systematische Erfassung dieser Daten (biologische Klasse/Familie/Spezies, Menge, Fundort, Fundkontext usw.) anhand von publizierten Ausgrabungsberichten ist eine kleinteilige Arbeit, die sich jedoch schließlich auszahlt. Bei den vergleichenden Auswertungen des gesammelten Datenmaterials lassen sich beispielsweise Aussagen über die Verbreitung bestimmter Arten treffen. Als eindrückliches Beispiel lässt sich der rätselhafte Fall des Lates niloticus anführen, des sog. Viktoriabarsches aus der Familie der Riesenbarsche. Knochen dieser auch bei uns heute beliebten Speisefischart finden sich an zahlreichen der untersuchten Küstenfundorte. Doch warum sind Fischknochen am Meer ein so ungewöhnlicher Fund? Ein anderer Name für diese Fischart liefert einen Hinweis: Nilbarsch. Denn es handelt sich beim Lates niloticus keineswegs um eine im Mittelmeer heimische Art, sondern um einen Süßwasserfisch, der in Flüssen, bspw. im Nil in Ägypten, beheimatet ist. Da die Fischknochen in solch auffälliger Quantität gefunden wurden, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass diese spezielle Art in größeren Mengen importiert wurde. Warum ein derartiger Aufwand für die Beschaffung einer bestimmten Fischart betrieben wurde, obwohl das Mittelmeer doch ausreichend Möglichkeiten zum Fischfang bot, ist eine der vielen interessanten weiterführenden Fragen, die sich bei der Betrachtung des Materials ergeben und auf die es Antworten zu finden gilt. Einen Hinweis liefert möglicherweise ein in Hala Sultan Teke (Zypern) gefundener Krater, der die Darstellung von mehreren Fischen zeigt. Noch ist die abgebildete Art nicht eindeutig identifiziert, doch könnte es sich dabei ebenfalls um Nilbarsche handeln.

    Daten aus erster Hand: Archäologische Feldforschung

    Mari Yamasaki verwendet für ihre Studie nicht nur bereits veröffentliche Daten, sondern hat außerdem die einzigartige Möglichkeit, Forschungsdaten aus erster Hand einfließen zu lassen. Bereits seit mehreren Jahren ist sie Teil eines internationalen Teams, das im Rahmen des Moni Pyrgos Pentakomo Monagroulli Survey Projektes (kurz: MPM) der Universität Chieti-Pescara (Italien) auf Zypern archäologische Untersuchungen der Küstenlandschaft mittels Surveys/geo-archäologischer Prospektion an Land und unter Wasser durchführt: Ziel des Projektes ist es zum einen festzustellen, inwiefern sich die Nutzung und Ausbeutung der maritimen bzw. der Küstenlandschaft über die Jahrtausende hinweg veränderten, denn Spuren menschlicher Aktivitäten lassen sich in diesem Bereich bereits für das Neolithikum nachweisen. Welches Potential der Nutzung bestand überhaupt zu welcher Zeit und wie wurde mit den bestehenden Ressourcen umgegangen? (Im Blog-Beitrag vom 05.06.2017 berichtet Mari Yamasaki von ihrem Aufenthalt auf Zypern im Mai, von den jüngsten Ergebnissen des Projektes, inwiefern menschliches Eingreifen in die Küstenlandschaften auch ein ganz aktuelles Thema ist und wie dies die Arbeit der Archäolog*innen vor Ort beeinflusst.) Die Untersuchungen ergaben, dass sich der Verlauf der Küstenlinie im Laufe der Zeit stark verändert hat. Besonders interessant ist in diesem Zusammenhang auch, dass im untersuchten Gebiet ein Fluss direkt ins Mittelmeer mündet, was der antiken Bevölkerung zusätzliche Möglichkeiten der ökonomischen Nutzung bot.
    Für Mari Yamasaki ergibt sich durch die Mitarbeit in diesem innovativen und engagierten Projekt die Möglichkeit, wichtige Erkenntnisse über die Rezeption der maritimen Umwelt im Küstenbereich zu gewinnen und diese auch vor Ort selbst nachzuvollziehen. Die Ergebnisse der landschaftsarchäologischen Untersuchungen bilden einen wichtigen Baustein für das Dissertationsprojekt, der in der Zusammenschau mit den anderen untersuchten Quellen (zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, ikonographische sowie textliche Belege) schließlich ein Gesamtbild der antiken Konzeption von und der Interaktion mit den „seascapes“ bieten wird.

    Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Mari Yamasaki: „Concepts of Seascapes and Marine Fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age“

    Ein Beitrag von Katharina Zartner.
     
    Am 01. Juni 2017 hat unsere Kollegin Mari Yamasaki ihr im letzten Herbst begonnenes Dissertationsprojekt mit dem Titel „Evolving concepts of seascapes and marine fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Bronze Age“ im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des Graduiertenkollegs vorgestellt. Sowohl den Professor*innen des Trägerkreises als auch den anderen Kollegiat*innen gewährte sie dabei interessante Einblicke in den aktuellen Stand ihrer Arbeit, ihre Methodik sowie in das weitere geplante Vorgehen und die Ziele des Dissertationsvorhabens.
     

    Fragestellungen und Zielsetzung

    Direkt zu Beginn ihres Vortrages nahm Mari Yamasaki eine mögliche kritische Frage vorweg: Warum ist es überhaupt gerechtfertigt, noch einmal zu „seascapes“ zu arbeiten, wurde das Thema doch in letzter Zeit in zahlreichen Untersuchungen bearbeitet? Doch gerade die Beschäftigung mit diesen neueren Abhandlungen macht nicht nur deutlich, welche Fortschritte in den letzten Jahrzehnten erzielt wurden, sondern auch, dass noch Lücken innerhalb dieses Forschungsfeldes bestehen. Daher wirft Mari Yamasaki in ihrem Dissertationsprojekt teils grundlegende und bisher unbeantwortete, teils weiterführende und teils gänzliche neue Fragen auf, so zum Beispiel:
     
    Was ist überhaupt eine Küste? Diese Frage ist bei weitem nicht so simpel zu beantworten, wie es im ersten Moment vielleicht scheinen mag. Zunächst müssen Kriterien herausgearbeitet werden, die entsprechend der antiken Weltsicht charakteristisch für eine Küste sind und an denen sich somit ein entsprechendes zugrunde liegendes Konzept festmachen lässt. Um solche Kriterien zu definieren, muss die Frage gestellt werden, wie die Landschaft entlang der Küste und das Meer selbst von den Menschen, die dort lebten, wahrgenommen wurden und wie diese mit und in ihrer Umwelt (inter-)agierten. Besonders das Eingreifen in die maritime Landschaft sowie die Nutzung und Ausbeutung von Ressourcen und lokaler Fauna stehen dabei im Fokus. Der geographische Rahmen dieser Untersuchung wird durch jene Staaten und Gesellschaften abgesteckt, die während der Bronzezeit (ca. 2500–1000 v. Chr., mit Fokus auf dem 2. Jt. v. Chr.) direkt am Handel im östlichen Mittelmeerraum beteiligt waren: Ägypten, das Reich von Hatti, der mykenische Kulturkreis sowie die Stadtstaaten entlang der Levante-Küste. In den Blick genommen werden dabei insbesondere die Küstensiedlungen, die eine entscheidende Rolle bei der Entstehung dieses (Handels-)Netzwerkes spielten. Welche Beziehungen bestanden zwischen diesen Siedlungen untereinander, welche Art von Austausch fand zwischen ihnen statt und inwiefern fungierten sie als Vermittler gegenüber dem Landesinneren? Schließlich stellt sich natürlich die wohl wichtigste Frage: Wie lässt sich all das im archäologischen Befund fassen?

     

    Ein rätselhafter Fisch – Die Materialgrundlage

    Die zuletzt gestellte Frage leitet direkt über zur Materialgrundlage: Welche Quellen können zur Beantwortung der aufgeworfenen Fragen herangezogen werden? Mari Yamasaki wertet für ihre Untersuchung verschiedene Materialgruppen aus: zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, bildliche Darstellungen sowie Schriftquellen. Im aktuellen Stadium der Arbeit setzt sie sich verstärkt mit den ersten beiden Gattungen auseinander, während die beiden letztgenannten zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt ausgewertet werden sollen.
     
    Das zooarchäologische Material, d.h. die in archäologischen Kontexten erhaltenen Überreste der antiken Fauna, setzt sich im Bereich der Küstensiedlungen v.a. aus Fischknochen, Muscheln und Überresten der sog. Murex-Schnecken, aus deren Sekret man in der Antike Purpur als Färbemittel gewann, zusammen. Die systematische Erfassung dieser Daten (biologische Klasse/Familie/Spezies, Menge, Fundort, Fundkontext usw.) anhand von publizierten Ausgrabungsberichten ist eine kleinteilige Arbeit, die sich jedoch schließlich auszahlt. Bei den vergleichenden Auswertungen des gesammelten Datenmaterials lassen sich beispielsweise Aussagen über die Verbreitung bestimmter Arten treffen. Als eindrückliches Beispiel lässt sich der rätselhafte Fall des Lates niloticus anführen, des sog. Viktoriabarsches aus der Familie der Riesenbarsche. Knochen dieser auch bei uns heute beliebten Speisefischart finden sich an zahlreichen der untersuchten Küstenfundorte. Doch warum sind Fischknochen am Meer ein so ungewöhnlicher Fund? Ein anderer Name für diese Fischart liefert einen Hinweis: Nilbarsch. Denn es handelt sich beim Lates niloticus keineswegs um eine im Mittelmeer heimische Art, sondern um einen Süßwasserfisch, der in Flüssen, bspw. im Nil in Ägypten, beheimatet ist. Da die Fischknochen in solch auffälliger Quantität gefunden wurden, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass diese spezielle Art in größeren Mengen importiert wurde. Warum ein derartiger Aufwand für die Beschaffung einer bestimmten Fischart betrieben wurde, obwohl das Mittelmeer doch ausreichend Möglichkeiten zum Fischfang bot, ist eine der vielen interessanten weiterführenden Fragen, die sich bei der Betrachtung des Materials ergeben und auf die es Antworten zu finden gilt. Einen Hinweis liefert möglicherweise ein in Hala Sultan Teke (Zypern) gefundener Krater, der die Darstellung von mehreren Fischen zeigt. Noch ist die abgebildete Art nicht eindeutig identifiziert, doch könnte es sich dabei ebenfalls um Nilbarsche handeln.

    Daten aus erster Hand: Archäologische Feldforschung

    Mari Yamasaki verwendet für ihre Studie nicht nur bereits veröffentliche Daten, sondern hat außerdem die einzigartige Möglichkeit, Forschungsdaten aus erster Hand einfließen zu lassen. Bereits seit mehreren Jahren ist sie Teil eines internationalen Teams, das im Rahmen des Moni Pyrgos Pentakomo Monagroulli Survey Projektes (kurz: MPM) der Universität Chieti-Pescara (Italien) auf Zypern archäologische Untersuchungen der Küstenlandschaft mittels Surveys/geo-archäologischer Prospektion an Land und unter Wasser durchführt: Ziel des Projektes ist es zum einen festzustellen, inwiefern sich die Nutzung und Ausbeutung der maritimen bzw. der Küstenlandschaft über die Jahrtausende hinweg veränderten, denn Spuren menschlicher Aktivitäten lassen sich in diesem Bereich bereits für das Neolithikum nachweisen. Welches Potential der Nutzung bestand überhaupt zu welcher Zeit und wie wurde mit den bestehenden Ressourcen umgegangen? (Im Blog-Beitrag vom 05.06.2017 berichtet Mari Yamasaki von ihrem Aufenthalt auf Zypern im Mai, von den jüngsten Ergebnissen des Projektes, inwiefern menschliches Eingreifen in die Küstenlandschaften auch ein ganz aktuelles Thema ist und wie dies die Arbeit der Archäolog*innen vor Ort beeinflusst.) Die Untersuchungen ergaben, dass sich der Verlauf der Küstenlinie im Laufe der Zeit stark verändert hat. Besonders interessant ist in diesem Zusammenhang auch, dass im untersuchten Gebiet ein Fluss direkt ins Mittelmeer mündet, was der antiken Bevölkerung zusätzliche Möglichkeiten der ökonomischen Nutzung bot.
    Für Mari Yamasaki ergibt sich durch die Mitarbeit in diesem innovativen und engagierten Projekt die Möglichkeit, wichtige Erkenntnisse über die Rezeption der maritimen Umwelt im Küstenbereich zu gewinnen und diese auch vor Ort selbst nachzuvollziehen. Die Ergebnisse der landschaftsarchäologischen Untersuchungen bilden einen wichtigen Baustein für das Dissertationsprojekt, der in der Zusammenschau mit den anderen untersuchten Quellen (zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, ikonographische sowie textliche Belege) schließlich ein Gesamtbild der antiken Konzeption von und der Interaktion mit den „seascapes“ bieten wird.

    Craven Seminar zum Thema „Eschatology and Apocalpyse in Graeco-Roman Literature“ vom 1. bis 3. Juni 2017 an der University of Cambridge

    Ein Beitrag von Dominic Bärsch.

    Bei bestem englischem Wetter fand vom 01. bis 03.06.2017 an der University of Cambridge das Craven Seminar zum Thema „Eschatology and Apocalpyse in Graeco-Roman Literature“ statt. Während dieser Konferenz setzten sich ausgewiesene Experten auf dem Gebiet der griechisch-römischen Kosmologie, Philosophie und Theologie mit der zentralen Frage auseinander, ob und welche Art von Apokalyptik – besonders in Bezug auf die Vorstellung eines oder mehrerer Weltuntergänge – in der griechischen und lateinischen Literatur der Antike nachzuweisen sind. Die Diskussion fokussierte sich dabei besonders auf die folgenden Schwerpunktfragen: Warum sprechen Texte von einem „gemeinsamen Schicksal von Menschen und Welt“? In welchen literarischen und historischen Kontexten werden diese Themen aufgeworfen? Wer sind die Figuren oder Personen, die Anteil an einem „apokalyptischen Diskurs“ nehmen?

    Nach einer herzlichen Begrüßung der Veranstalter begann das erste Panel mit dem Überthema „Political Eschatologies“. Dieses wurde von Richard Seaford (Exeter) eröffnet, der während seines Vortrags „Eschatology and the polis: the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Aeschylus, and Aristophanes“ konstatierte, dass die frühe griechische Kultur keine „mythology of the end of days“ formuliert hat. Als Begründung dafür führte er besonders an, dass die Wiederholung bestimmter ritueller Handlungen wohl zu einem zyklischen Bewusstsein von Weltzeit geführt habe und Krisensituationen stets in der Überwindung dieser Krise geführt wurden, anstatt ein Ende zu imaginieren. Im darauffolgenden Vortrag „Sibylline Apocalypse“ setzte sich Helen Van Noorden (Cambridge) mit der Gattung der Sibyllinischen Orakel auseinander und präsentierte die in Katastrophennarrativen transportierten Anspielungen auf historische Umstände. In Ergänzung zu ihr präsentierte Stephen Oakley (Cambridge) in seinem Vortrag „The Tiburtine Sibyl“ ein Beispiel der Rezeption einer antiken Sibylle, die als pagane Prophetin auch über die Antike hinaus als autoritativer Argumentationspunkt genutzt wurde.
     
    Im anschließenden, kleinen Panel „Junior scholars‘ presentations“ erhielt Dominic Bärsch neben Jonathan Griffiths (Heidelberg) die Möglichkeit, einige Aspekte seiner Dissertation zu präsentieren und Rückmeldungen zu erhalten. Zunächst erläuterte Jonathan Griffiths in seinem Vortrag „kosmos agêrôs kai anosos: The Indestructibility of the World in Plato’s Timaeus“ seine Erkenntnisse zur Kosmologie im platonischen Timaios, wobei er sich vor allem auf die kosmogonischen Passagen und deren Auswirkungen für die platonische Philosophie konzentrierte. Geradezu entgegengesetzt in Sprache und Zeit fokussierte Dominic Bärsch in seinem Vortrag „To Pray or not to Pray for the End – Tertullian’s Statements about the End of the World“ den christlichen, lateinischen Apologeten Tertullian, der sich in seinen Werken mit Blick auf den Rezipientenkreis entweder dafür ausspricht, für einen Aufschub des Weltuntergangs oder für ein baldiges Eintreten dieser komischen Katastrophe zu beten. Die folgende Diskussion – wie die Tagung generell – brachte wertvolle Anregungen, nicht nur zu diesem, sondern zu den verschiedensten Teilen seiner Forschung.
     
    Das zweite Großpanel der Konferenz mit dem Titel „Roman prophets and world history“ bestritt zunächst Katharina Volk (New York) und setzte sich in ihrem Vortrag „Not the End of the World? Omens and Prophecies at the Fall of the Roman Republic“ mit der spätrepublikanischen Literatur und der Interpretation verschiedener Omina und deren Bezug auf den römischen Bürgerkrieg auseinander. Passend dazu folgte ihr Alessandro Schiesaro (Manchester), dessen Vortrag „Virgil’s underworld between Lucretius and Freud“ vor allem die Passagen zum Weltuntergang in Lukrezens De rerum natura thematisierten, die ein Herzstück der römisch-apokalyptischen Literatur darstellen. Mit einem Schritt hin zur augusteischen Literatur rundete schließlich Elena Giusti (Cambridge) mit ihrem Vortrag „The End is the Beginning is the End: Apocalyptic Beginnings in Augustan Poetry“ ab. Die augusteischen Dichter, in ihrem Bestreben das imperium sine fine der augusteischen Ideologie literarisch abzubilden, imaginierten den Weltuntergang als eine Katastrophe, die in Form des Bürgerkrieges bereits eingetreten sei und aus der sich wiederum das neue „goldene Zeitalter“ erhebe, in dem sie nun selbst lebten.
     
    Am Freitagnachmittag wurden dann im Panel „Revelations of individual and universal destiny“ besonders Fragen zu antiken Vorstellungen von Individualeschatologien aufgeworfen. Zu diesem Themenkomplex präsentierte zunächst Christoph Riedweg (Zürich) in seinem Vortrag „Pythagorean ideas about the afterlife“ Aspekte der pythagoreischen Seelenlehre, die nach wie vor schwer zu rekonstruieren ist. Ergänzend dazu beschäftigte sich Alex Long (St. Andrews) in seinem Vortrag „Platonic myths, the soul and its intra-cosmic future“ mit der platonischen Seelenlehre, wobei in der Diskussion der beiden Vorträge spannende Erkenntnisse zu Überlappungen und Differenzen der Konzepte konstatiert wurden. In die lateinische Literatur führten dagegen wieder die Vorträge von Francesca Romana Berno (Rom) „Apocalypse is everyday. Lucretius, Nero, and the End of the World in Seneca“ sowie von Katharine Earnshaw (Exeter) „Lucanian eschatology: from bones to the stars“, die den Blick auf die neronische Literatur richteten. Sowohl Seneca als auch Lucan präsentieren gewaltige Imaginationen des Weltendes, die jeweils eine besondere Funktion im Kontext ihrer Werke erfüllen.
     
    Der die Konferenz abschließende Samstag war schließlich auf das Thema „Influence on Christian thought“ ausgerichtet, wobei sich lediglich Catherine Pickstock (Cambridge) mit ihrem Vortrag „Christian apocalypse as a version of Platonic philosophy“ diesem komplexen Bereich widmete. In der anschließenden Diskussion wurden jedoch spannende Fragen zum Thema der Rezeption und Adaptation paganer Konzepte angeschnitten. Den letzten Vortrag der Konferenz mit dem Titel „Last Laughs“ bestritt schließlich Rebecca Lämmle, die sich mit den Totengesprächen Lucians und dessen Rezeption früherer Unterweltsnarrative auseinandersetzte, wobei im Anschluss ausgiebig darüber diskutiert wurde, inwieweit die fiktiven Dialoge zwischen den Toten eine pessimistische Anschauung zu Leben und Tod transportierten.

    Die abrundende Abschlussdiskussion rief noch einmal die eingangs diskutierten Fragen auf, wobei schnell klar wurde, dass in bestimmten Teilen der antiken Literatur eindeutig ein „apokalyptischer Diskurs“ zu erkennen ist, der besonders in Zeiten von Krisen und Katastrophen aufgerufen wird. Kontextuell ist dieser stets eingebettet und wird nie abstrahiert dargestellt, etwa in einer reinen Theorie des Weltuntergangs.

    An dieser Stelle sei einerseits besonders den Veranstaltern des Craven Seminars Helen Van Noorden und Richard Hunter gedankt, die es mir ermöglichten, an dieser gewinnbringenden und anspruchsvollen Tagung teilzunehmen. Andererseits sei auch dem Graduiertenkolleg 1876 gedankt, das die finanzielle Unterstützung bereitgestellt hat, um diese Teilnahme zu ermöglichen.
     

    Endangered coastscapes in Cyprus

    A Weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

     

    Cloudy, a light drizzle, and un-seasonally cold. I don’t remember ever having to wear long sleeves in Cyprus in May … and at noon no less! These were my thoughts as I waited for the project director, Prof. Oliva Menozzi, to pick me up at the bus stop on the day of my arrival on May 22nd. She arrived shortly after, we exchanged the customary Italian hugs and kisses and drove to meet the rest of the team at the „dig house“ in Germasogeia. I looked around the place and almost failed to recognize what should have been a familiar neighbourhood. Professor Menozzi turned to me, easily guessing my thoughts: in less than one year they built at new nondescript cottage and around us I could see two construction sites for bigger, duller, holiday-apartment buildings (Fig. 1). Not too long ago, this area used to be a village of a few sparse houses near the city, now it is impossible to tell it apart from the sprawling outskirts of Limassol. Sadly, Germasogeia is not an isolated example. Urbanization and reckless development are a problem almost everywhere along the Cypriot coasts. Within the MPM Survey Project (Moni Pyrgos Pentakomo Monagroulli Survey Project, University of Chieti), the preservation of cultural heritage has always been a high priority on the agenda, and fieldwork was always carried out with an eye out for evidences of looting and suspicious activities by developers, which were always reported to the officer of the Department of Antiquities in Limassol.
    

    Figure 1: Satellite photograph of the area surrounding the dig house in 2016 and in 2017 (Photo ©GoogleEarth).

    I have been coming to Cyprus for some years now, cooperating with several projects with different objectives. Among these, MPM holds a special place in my heart for a number of reasons, both academic and not. I was first involved with this team because of my research interest in ancient Mediterranean coastscapes: their surveying strategies, and especially their underwater survey project, strongly appealed to me. Luckily, they were looking for a diving-archaeologist and I was offered to co-supervise the diving team and full access to all data. As if all these positives were not enough, the warmth and cheerfulness of the team and their director won me over, and I can now count myself as an established asset of the MPM Project. This time my stay in Cyprus was also made possible by the funding received from the Research Training Group 1876 of Mainz University. For this trip, I only stayed for a relatively short time to continue the underwater work on a site that we individuated the previous year.
    After spending the first day setting up the „base“ with all the necessary equipment, on 23rd of May we started the actual fieldwork – and not without setbacks. After we drove to the survey area covering the municipalities of Moni, Pyrgos, Monagrouli and Pentakomo, the land and the underwater archaeologists (among whom, myself – Fig. 2) split up to reach their respective fields. Unfortunately, due to the storms that rocked the island during the past few days, work proceeded slower than scheduled. The unusually unfavourable marine conditions hampered the underwater excavation, which could not take place as programmed. Our site is located on the collapsed cliff rocks at a very shallow depth, well within the reach of the wave undertow: working in such conditions could put both the material and the divers in danger and only limited test soundings were made when possible.
    Figure 2: The diving and snorkelling team (Photo courtesy of MPM Survey Project, University of Chieti).

    The weather improved after the first three days and thanks to the rise in outside temperatures and despite the strong current and cold water, it was at least possible to continue the aquatic survey for the full length of the bay, which was originally scheduled for next October, instead of the actual excavation. Due to the changes in plans of the underwater mission, the ground team also redirected their efforts to survey the cliffs and fields immediately facing the seafront. In the water, the anthropization visible on the land was not nearly as obvious, with the exception of a dock in the proximity of a quarrying site (Fig. 3) and, on my last day of fieldwork (as in the best archaeological tradition), we encountered a significant scatter of cultural material that may be consistent with an anchorage.
    Figure 3: View from land of the quarrying site: the darker spot in the centre-right is the underwater dock (Photo by Mari Yamasaki).

    Despite the relative misfortune of not being able to excavate as much as we had hoped, the survey nonetheless produced significant information. From the strictly archaeological point of view, the team was able to localize a complex system of settlements that connected the sea to the hinterland via the fluvial valleys of the Moni and Pyrgos rivers, changing through the different periods as the type of exploitation of the coastal resources changed.
    A parallel objective of the survey was the appraisal of the risk represented by development and touristic exploitation of the coastal zones. In fact, both represent a heavy menace for this historically rich region. Between the eighties and the first decade of the third millennium, the coastal limestone has been massively quarried to produce cement. More recently, a new form of tourism based on massive all-inclusive resorts turned this potential ally into a menace for the local natural and archaeological heritage. Whilst the reasons behind the problem represented by industry are clear, it is harder to understand why touristic development would want to erase the potential source of income represented by archaeology. 
    What we encountered during one of our days in the field is but a tiny example. During the study of the work done by earlier archaeological missions, whose area of interest happened to partly overlap with our own, we read that a previous survey from 2007 reported the presence of a Bronze Anchor embedded in one of the low stone walls at the end of the beach we were currently studying. The object was photographed and measured but at the time could not be removed due to jurisdictional conflict between the two regional districts of Limassol and Larnaca. Despite our best efforts in examining every bit of wall and all but combing the bay and the beach, we failed to re‑locate it. We asked the people working in the beach establishments only to receive a disturbing confirmation: there was indeed an object similar to the one in our photo, but no one had seen it since the construction of the new seafront restaurant. We returned to the car with strong suspicion that another piece of archaeology was lost to development, but all the more aware of that archaeology alone can only keep a record, and that the key to preserving the past is to maintain good communication between the parties involved.
    Luckily things have changed greatly since 2007. Thanks to an ever growing degree of cooperation between foreign archaeological missions and the Department of Antiquities, some progress – however slow – has been made towards the integration of cultural heritage and economic development, and to prevent petty bureaucratic problems from stopping archaeological research and preservation. As far as the MPM Survey Project is concerned, a tight cooperation with the local authorities from the Limassol District resulted in the joint elaboration of protective measures for the area: the survey grounds are now under a strict surveillance for their archaeological potential, allowing for a more accurate mapping of the sites on the territory, and for prompt intervention against illegal construction and looting activities. It is our job, as archaeologists – regardless of nationality or affiliation-, to collaborate for the preservation of the unique cultural and natural heritage that lies on the beautiful island of Cyprus (Fig. 4).
     
    Figure 4. Left: Wheat field in the Moni River valley. Right: Limestone cliffs at Agios Georgios Alamanos (Photos by Mari Yamasaki).

    Mehr als „nur Schall und Rauch“: Vulkane aus interdisziplinärer Perspektive

    Ein Beitrag von Katharina Hillenbrand.

    Interdisziplinäres Arbeiten wird in der Forschung immer stärker gefordert. Kritiker bemängeln jedoch, dass dies oft eher zu oberflächlichem Halb- als zu neuem Fachwissen führe. Bei meiner Arbeit konnte ich diese Erfahrung nicht machen: Der Austausch mit Archäologen und Vulkanologen hat meine Forschung zu antiken Konzepten von Vulkanismus auch aus fachlicher Sicht sehr bereichert.
     
    Ausgangspunkt war ein Bündel voll Fragen, die sich im Laufe meiner Arbeit gesammelt hatten: Zu sprachlichen Bildern und technischen Vorstellungen, die Vulkanismus in antiken Texten veranschaulichen, die ich mir aber auch nach dem Wälzen von Literatur nicht hinreichend selbst erklären konnte.

    Dank einiger Gespräche mit Vertretern anderer Disziplinen konnte ich mittlerweile aber hinter manche von diesen statt des Frage- ein Ausrufungszeichen setzen. So traf ich mich am 10.02. mit Dr. Michael Herdick, dem Leiter des Kompetenzbereichs Experimentelle Archäologie, einer Außenstelle des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums in Mayen, um über Nutzung, Funktion und Aufbau römischer Öfen zu reden. Dr. Herdick hat sich vielfach experimentell mit antiken und mittelalterlichen Öfen beschäftigt und konnte mir wie kein zweiter Rede und Antwort zu meinen Fragen stehen. Dies mag auf den ersten Blick nicht unmittelbar relevant für antike Konzepte von Vulkanismus sein – tatsächlich werden vulkanische Vorgänge aber in mehreren Passagen mit Öfen verglichen. Das Wissen um die Funktionsweise dieser Technik ließ daher einige Rückschlüsse auf die vermittelten Vorstellungen von Vulkanismus zu.
     

    

    Abb. 1 und 2: Fumarole und Schlot in der Solfatara bei Pozzuoli (Fotos: Katharina Hillenbrand).

    Ähnliche Anregungen brachten auch mehrere Gespräche mit Vertretern anderer Disziplinen während meiner Reise durch die vulkanischen Gebiete Süditaliens vom 26.03. bis 15.04.2017.

     
    Der Austausch mit vor Ort in den Observatorien forschenden Vulkanologen bereicherte nicht nur mein naturwissenschaftliches Wissen über Vulkane. Zu meinem eigenen Erstaunen konnte ich immer wieder frappierende Ähnlichkeiten zwischen antiken Texten und modernen Erklärungsansätzen erkennen: Nicht so sehr in den Prämissen, die durchaus unterschiedlich sind, als vielmehr in den Metaphern und Vergleichen, welche die Vorgänge veranschaulichen sollten. Sind also einige, in der Forschung oft als „merkwürdig“ betitelte antike Passagen zu Vulkanen womöglich eher das Ergebnis genauerer Observation? Auch hier konnte ich einen unmittelbaren Nutzen für fachliche Erkenntnisse erzielen.

     
    

     
    

    Abb. 3 und 4: Rauchende Krater und heiße Lava am Ätna (Fotos: Katharina Hillenbrand).
     
    Schließlich war auch der Austausch mit vor Ort grabenden Archäologen ein Gewinn. Diese hatten an antiken Heiligtümern geforscht, die vor allem bei hydrothermalen Erscheinungen und Matschvulkanen lagen, einem als sekundärer Vulkanismus bezeichneten Phänomen. Die archäologische Sichtweise auf die Kultstätten war eine wichtige Ergänzung; zugleich zeigten sich Parallelen zu Vorstellungen in der antiken Literatur.
     
    

     

    Abb. 5 und 6: Matschvulkanismus, Salinelle di San Marco bei Paternò (Fotos: Katharina Hillenbrand).
    

    Antike Konzepte von Vulkanismus, so das Fazit meiner Reisen, lassen sich durch die Beschränkung auf Mittel der Klassischen Philologie zwar erklären. Gleichwohl konnten durch die Einbeziehung anderer Disziplinen viele Überlegungen vertieft oder konkretisiert werden: Es fanden sich in den Texten Spuren anderer Wissensbereiche, die durch den interdisziplinären Austausch auf meine Fragestellung nutzbar angewendet werden konnten. Nicht zuletzt deswegen war es auch mehr als bereichernd, die in den antiken Texten erwähnten Vulkane und Gebiete einmal selbst zu „observieren“. All dies ermöglichte es zumindest ein Stück weit, antike Sichtweisen auf Vulkane besser zu verstehen.
     

    Ich danke der DFG und dem Graduiertenkolleg 1876 für die Möglichkeit, die diversen Reisen zu unternehmen. Ich bedanke mich insbesondere auch bei Dr. Michael Herdick vom Kompetenzbereich Experimentelle Archäologie in Mayen, bei Dr. Giovanni Ricciardi und Dr. Tullia Uzzo vom Osservatorio Vesuviano, bei Dr. Stefanco Branca vom Osservatorio Etneo sowie bei Dr. Laura Maniscalco vom Assessorato Beni culturali e dell‘ Identitá Siciliana für ihre Hilfsbereitschaft, die vielen Anregungen und guten Gespräche.

     

    York and Manchester: A report of a perfect March

    A weblog entry by Shahrzad Irannejad.


    The March of 2017 was the perfect month for me. I went to the charming city of York in the UK to present a paper, and met amazing scholars whose feedback on my paper was very helpful; I went to Manchester for a very fruitful research visit to the department of Prof. Peter Pormann, my mentor; I got to play a tourist in London, and the perfect month ended with a visit to my family in London to celebrate the Persian new year, Nowruz
    Fig 1. Where I learned that Constantine (c. 272–337) AD was proclaimed emperor in York (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

    The as-if-tailored-for-me conference „The Medieval Brain“ was a very fruitful, cozy and friendly conference with nine sessions and two key note speeches, held on the 9th, 10th, and 11th of March 2017 in The Treehouse, Humanities Research Centre, University of York. It was supported by Welcome Trust and brought together scholars in various discipline such as art history, linguistics, computational linguistics, philology, medieval studies, medical history, psychology and psychiatry. 
    Fig 2. The organizer of the conference, Deborah Thorpe in the left, moderating the Q and A after the keynote speech by Corinne Saunders on the right (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
     I presented my paper ‘The Brain in Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine’ in the second panel „Grey Matters: Structuring the Brain“, alongside Prof. Salmon (University of Cantabria): ‚A complexional brain: Medical approaches to brain structure and functioning in the 13th and 14th centuries‘ and Cher Casey (University of York): ‚Making Matter of the Mind: reconstructing the medieval cranial anatomy of Cologne’s 11,000 Holy Virgin skull relics‘. I hope that the discussions following the panel would continue well into the future. You might want to take a look at afterthoughts of the organizer of the conference, Deborah Thorpe here. And I am NOT necessarily sharing this link because she has published a picture of me while presenting my paper. 
    Fig 3. For one week, I would come to the Samuel Alexander building to read, write, and discuss my work with Prof. Pormann’s team (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

    

    Fig 4. I received a library card for a week to use the library of Manchester University, very convenient (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

    I left a piece of my heart in York and moved on to Manchester for my first research stay at the department of my mentor, Prof. Peter Pormann. I had the luck to present my findings on Avicenna’s brain anatomy in a paper entitled „The Brain Ventricles and the Rete Mirabile from Galen to Avicenna“ on the last meeting of the Arabic Commentaries on the Hippocratic Aphorisms project (16 March 2017). Prof. Pormann visited us in Mainz back in May 2016 and shared with us insights about the project in a plenary meeting. On the Arabic Aphorisms days in Manchester, all team members gather together to present their works in progress, discuss and receive feedback. I also met Prof. Glen Cooper and Dr. Grigory Kessel during my stay in Manchester and received comments on my work. I used the rest of the days reading, writing and receiving guidance and comments about my work, not only from Prof. Pormann, but also from his amazing team members: Dr. Kamran Karimullah, Dr. Hammood Obaid, and Dr. Elaine van Dalen. 

    Fig 5. A promising conference in December 2017: “Genealogies of Knowledge I: Translating Political and Scientific Thought across Time and Space” (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
    I arrived in Manchester, as the previous project was being wrapped up, and a new project was being started: Genealogies of Knowledge: The Evolution and Contestation of Concepts across Time and Space. This project is based at the University of Manchester and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. It brings together senior scholars from Translation Studies, Graeco-Arabic Studies, Digital Media and Communication, and Computer Science. This project focuses on two constellations of concepts: 1) the historical evolution and transformation through translation of the two constellations of concepts, focusing on seminal moments of change in the reception and reproduction of translated texts and their meanings by subsequent readerships. This involves examining commentaries and (re)translations from/into Greek, early Latin, medieval Arabic and modern English; 2) the ways and means by which civil society actors involved in radical democratic groups and counter-hegemonic globalisation movements contest and redefine the meaning of such cultural concepts today, as part of an evolving radical-democratic project. This promising project involves building large, diverse electronic corpora of Greek, Latin, Arabic and English. I would be presenting a paper entitled “Translation, Transmission, Transformation: Diachronic Development of Brain Anatomy in Greco-Arabic Medicine” at the first conference of this project „Genealogies of Knowledge I: Translating Political and Scientific Thought across Time and Space“ in December 2017. 

    At the end of my trip, and before joining my family, I made perfect use of my time in London and visited the Welcome Trust collection and the last house of Sigmund Freud. I am not sure if the pictures can convey a slight bit of my excitement. I share them with you, nonetheless.
    

    Fig 6. Playing tourist in London: probably the most famous couch in the world (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
    Fig 7.  Playing tourist in London: the amazing votive collection at Welcome Trust (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
    Fig 8.  Playing tourist in London: a fascinating 18thcentury anatomical model in the Welcome Trust collection (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

     
    Fig 9. Playing tourist in London: my friend “accidentally” sitting right under Avicenna’s name at the Welcome Trust Library (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad). 
    Fig 10. Playing tourist in London: excuses to come back (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

     

    Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes

    A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

    Between the 20th and 23rd of March, the beautiful city of Kiel (Fig. 1) served as the backdrop for the fifth international Open Workshop „Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes“ organized by the Graduate School „Human Development in Landscapes“ of Kiel University.
    

    Figure 1: Sunset at Ratsdienergarten, Kiel (Photo by Mari Yamasaki).

    
    The workshop hosted over two hundred papers divided into 18 sessions over 4 days, with participants coming from a variety of scientific backgrounds and from all over the globe in a truly interdisciplinary and international environment. In addition to the talks, there was a rich poster session in which the author participated with a poster titled „Coastal worlds in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age“ (Fig. 2). At any given moment, there were 6 to 9 sessions running in parallel and it is for this reason that, as much as I would have liked to, it was not possible to attend all the lectures and discussions. However, I shall at least try to provide a concise overview of the incredible work that was done during these days. 
    

    Figure 2: The conference venue – main lecture hall, fields around the campus, posters (Photos by Mari Yamasaki).

    

    Prof. Carole Crumley (Stockholm University) opened the workshop with thought-provoking questions: what is the contemporary role of the sciences that study the past, if there is any role left at all? What is in fact the purpose of studying the past? How can the past contribute to the current discourse in a way that it matters to the world we live in? In her engaging keynote lecture, Prof. Crumley proposed to try answering this question via a bottom-up approach, introducing the concept of Historical Ecology. The question, she said, should be formulated in terms of what we, as humans, need to save and send into the future, and of how the scientists – social and human – can inform the politics and the real world. In her words, Historical Ecology should be regarded as a „research framework for merging many kinds of evidence to reach new understanding of the human-environment relationship“.

    The usefulness of the study of the past and, particularly of the archaeological landscape, was addressed several times during the conference, under different points of view. The role of the landscape as lieux de mémoire was presented by Prof. Richard Bradley, University of Reading, in his talk „Commemoration and change: remembering what may not have happened“. His talk highlighted the importance of monuments and landmarks as repositories of the collective past, whether real or – more often – imagined. The landscape was therefore presented as the privileged theatre for the display of cultural memory.

    Another such example was Maria Wunderlich’s (Kiel University) comparative study of prehistoric megalithic structures in northern Europe with the ethnological observation of contemporary megalith-building tribes in south-east Asia and India. In the latter instances, these were generally erected as a public reminder of the „good deeds“ of an individual (or a family, or a clan) towards the community. She convincingly argued that the Europen prehistoric equivalents may have served a similar function.

    Less theoretical and more practical were the Quantitative Analysis and Modelling in Archaeology sessions. The study of landscape was here addressed from a methodological point of view. Interesting ideas were especially presented in regards to new approaches in the understanding of the ancient settlement choices and population behaviour. Particularly interesting was the concept of fuzzification introduced by W. B. Hamer (Plans on agent based model approach on prehistoric scale, Hamer, W. B et al.). Introducing a fuzzification factor in agent-based modelling, means, for instance, to blur the lines of possibility in simulating past decision-making processes in settlement choice (e.g. when considering the factor of „steepness“ in determining whether a location is suitable for settlement, instead of drawing a clear line between suitable and non-suitable, fuzzification allows to blend this border into a grey area which, to put it simply, is far from ideal, but still acceptable). Fuzziness can be applied to a variety of situations. The pole dwellings of the Alpine lakes, for instance, are an example of terrains that would be theoretically unsuitable for permanent settlement as the muddy shores are subject to frequent seasonal inundation. However, although such locations resulted „far from ideal“, they were still „good enough“ for the prehistoric builders, probably thanks to the excellent access to the lacustrine resources.

    Moving on to lakescapes and seascapes, a great wealth of field projects were presented during the relevant session, mostly focusing on the lake dwellings along the shores of Lake Constance, some on the great riverine-lacustrine systems of central Europe, with a focus on the role of the Danube as a main communication artery. My very personal and somewhat biased note concerning this – otherwise very interesting – session is that the complex seascapes of the Mediterranean area were heavily underrepresented, and it could have been interesting to compare the methodologies applied in such different geographical areas.

    In conclusion, this event, with its great variety of topics and approaches, was a great source of inspiration for future work. Furthermore, it was a chance to stop and ponder over the reasons why the study of the past and the understanding of the ancient landscapes are of utmost importance for the humanity of the future.
     

    And now for something completely different… Social Media and Internet Presence

    A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki and Laura Borghetti.

    Heidelberg, February 27th, 8:30 AM. An Egyptologist, a Classical Philologist, a Byzantine Philologist and a Near Eastern Archaeologist walk into a room of female mathematicians. This is not the beginning of a joke, but of the two-day workshop in this ancient university town. In the elegant conference room of ArtHotel, a few puzzled gazes fly towards us, the only four girls from the Humanities. „So… what brought you here?“ we are repeatedly asked. Considering that we are at the Third Networking and Mentoring Workshop for Women in Mathematics, the four of us agree it is a legitimate question. What brought us here, we always reply, is the theme of this workshop: Social Media and Internet Presence.

    Fig. 1: From left: Mari Yamasaki, Laura Borghetti, Simone Gerhards, Gabriela Meyer and Katharina Hillenbrand (Photo by Maria Ruprecht).


    To understand our answer, here’s a little background. When our GRK started, it was agreed that the best way of engaging with the general public would be through a weblog – the very same you are reading right now. After a few years, we came to realize that in order to reach more people, this could use some improvement and maybe could be supported by another social media platform. After some discussion and considering how most of us are to some extent familiar with it, we decided that an official Facebook page could fill this „supporting role“. However, far from being experts, we looked forward to this workshop to find inspiration as to how we should pursue our goal.

    The two key-roles of this initiative have been played by Maria Rupprecht, Executive Networking Coordinator at the Ruprecht-Karls Universität in Heidelberg within „Upstream – the Network for Women in Maths“ and Gabriela Meyer, expert in communication, publicist and trainer in public relations. Thanks to their professionalism and friendliness, and during an intense but exciting two-days program, it was made possible to break the general suspicion against social networks and animate a lively brainstorming about this new form of media. Concepts of different kind of social medias, from the rather job search-oriented Xing to the more popular Twitter, from the online business card about.me to the web-storytelling in travel-blogs: all were taken as practical examples during the workshop. Even more interesting was the rather interactive side of our meeting, when we participants were asked to create new accounts or to improve our own existing ones. 

    Making use of the opportunity of having an expert at hand, we volunteered to present our weblog as a case study of the use of social media to support scientific engagement with the wider public. Ms. Meyer showed us the strong points of our page and (most importantly) the weak ones. While not touching the merit of the scientific and educational content, she gave us advice on how we could modify its layout to make it more appealing for the casual and the expert reader alike. We were able to collect much input and many good ideas that will need a little bit of time to be implemented, but changes are coming, so keep following us! One novelty is already out there: check out our new Facebook page

    Fig. 2: Katharina Hillenbrand and Simone Gerhards showing our Weblog to Gabriela Meyer (Photo by Maria Ruprecht).


    As we saw during these two days, the poor reputation for Social Media often comes from a misuse of their potential. For instance, the flood of breakfast photos on Instagram or of cat jokes on Facebook devalues these platforms. Much worse, social media are sadly the fastest way to spread false and unverified news. For these reasons, it is even more important to implement the use of this technology to disseminate scientific knowledge in an attractive and accessible way. The decision to adopt a popular platform such as Facebook in parallel with our official weblog serves exactly this purpose. Not only to give fast and concise updates on the research that our Graduiertenkolleg is working on, but also to promptly inform our readers about cultural initiatives the doctoral students take part in, and why not, to get to know us. For research is not an abstract entity detached from the world, but it is made of people, of colleagues and friends, even if virtual.

    The Oxford Byzantine Society’s 19th International Graduate Conference: Circulation and Transmission of Ideas between Past and Present

    A weblog entry by Laura Borghetti.

    When it comes to cultural vivacity and exchange of knowledge, very few places are as inspiring as Oxford, UK. Colleges and faculties, enclosed in solemn and slender gothic buildings, shape the almost magical profile of the old city (fig. 1). Visitors, especially scholars, get the feeling of walking along a huge, lively university campus that romantically tastes like the Middle Ages. In such atmosphere, from February the 24th till 25th 2017, took place The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 19th International Graduate Conference, with a title that perfectly matches Oxford’s vivacious academic environment: „Transmitting and Circulating the Late Antiquity and Byzantine Worlds“.

    Fig. 1: Some views of Oxford (from the left): Inner courtyard in Exeter College, the main door of the History Faculty with the Conference’s poster, the Dome of the Radcliffe Camera. (Photos by Laura Borghetti)


    Given the vastness of the late Roman and Byzantine Empires in terms of both territorial extent and cultural variety, the circulation and transmission of ideas, people, texts and objects played a decisive role in creating a political, economic and religious network which – in turn – ensured the unity of both empires for more than ten centuries. Closely mirroring the byzantine millennium, the program of the conference was extremely various and fascinating: more than fifty papers, concerning byzantine philology, history, art and archaeology – divided in two simultaneous sessions – allowed the participants shape a quite comprehensive portrait of the modalities, frequency and different means of cultural transmission in Byzantium.

    The lively brainstorming after each speaker’s presentation was enough evidence for how effective this conference was in stimulating the exchange of knowledge and the circulation of new ideas. Especially, given the participation of only graduate students, the brainstorming related to still in-progress projects could inspire, in both the speakers and the rest of participants, new points of view, perspectives and approaches that might be useful to each individual research.


    The chance to take a small part in the organization of such an event has for me been both an honour and a pleasure: following Mirela Ivanova’s friendly but firm directions (Mirela is an Oxford PhD student and the president of the Oxford University Byzantine Society during this academic year), the Oxford graduates‘ crew took care of organising participants‘ invitations and accommodation and arranging delicious coffee breaks, meals and evening wine receptions. I personally could enjoy some unskilled labour such as cutting paper badges or preparing coffee for the guests. As an Italian assiduous coffee-drinker, I took this last task pretty much seriously (fig. 2). 

    Fig. 2: Mirela Ivanova and Laura Borghetti in the common room of the History Faculty. (Photo by Laura Borghetti)

    The most challenging side in the whole organising process was surely gathering the speakers from all over the world. From Great Britain to Turkey, from Italy to Japan, this conference has shown how the circulation and the transmission of ideas and people in Byzantium many centuries ago still manages, nowadays, to instigate the transmission of old ideas and new, and circulation of people and their gathering to exchange ideas.