Planet History

Author Archive for editorial board

The Allure of Airport Rhythms

By Juan Miguel Leandro L. Quizon. Travel entails expectations, musings, and meanderings. The moment travelers make final confirmations of flight bookings, their minds begin to explore the countless possibilities of their new journey. However, this year reminded us how a pandemic can seize travel instantaneously.

Islam and Heritage in Europe: Pasts, Presents and Future Possibilities

By Katarzyna Puzon. This year marks the twentieth anniversary of 9/11 – an event that triggered a significant and sustained rise in prejudice, discrimination, and hate crimes against Muslims, which has increased steadily since then. The tragic developments that followed, especially the invasions of Afghanistan in 2001 and of Iraq in 2003, still reverberate across Europe, not least in the recent ‘refugee crises’.

The African Refugee Equilibrium

By George Njung. Africans‘ lack of knowledge about our own shared refugee experiences continues to fuel hate and discrimination on the continent. For far too long, the global refugee situation has been misconstrued as static, with certain parts of the globe generating disproportionate numbers of refugees and others perpetually faced with the burden of hosting displaced peoples.

The Strange Case of Portugal’s Returnees

By Christoph Kalter. The year is 1975, and the footage comes from the Portuguese Red Cross. Who, or maybe what, are these people? Returnees or retornados is the term commonly assigned to more than half-a-million people, the vast majority of them white settlers from Angola and Mozambique, most of whom arrived in Lisbon in 1975.

Refugees and Religion

By Birgit Meyer. The volume Refugees and Religion: Ethnographic Studies of Global Trajectories, co-edited by Birgit Meyer and Peter van der Veer, disputes a hard and fast distinction between migrants and refugees by showing how shifting legal arrangements as well as people’s varying statuses make the concept of ‘refugee’ dynamic.

Mozambique’s borders

By Adérito Júlio Machava. During the period prior to the setting up of the Portuguese colonial administration in southeast Africa, there were important waves of forced migrations caused by, firstly, the Mfecane, and secondly the defeat of King Ngungunhane in 1895, and the subsequent overthrow of the Gaza Empire.

From the Niger to the Nile

By Madina Thiam. On February 17, 1907, a brief note went out of the Dakar office of the Governor-General of French West Africa, addressed to subordinates. The governor had learned through French newspapers that: „According to a report on Northern Nigeria … thousands of Fulanis from the Middle Niger might be migrating from the French territory and heading towards the Nile valley.“

Passing as a Refugee

By Keren Weitzberg. Mahad was born in Kenya – a fact that neither his passport, nor carefully scripted biography suggests. For decades, Kenyan Somalis (citizens of Kenya who also identify as Somali) have faced discrimination in accessing legal documents, including national identity cards, passports, and birth certificates.

Jesuit legacy in Beijing: Sacred Buildings and Transcultural Spaces

By Lianming Wang. Following the “global turn” in the 1990s, and particularly stimulated by Gauvin Alexander Bailey’s path-breaking Art on the Jesuit Missions in Asia and Latin America, 1542–1773, the study of Jesuit art and architecture has grown into a remarkably dynamic field that provides marvellous insights for reading art history through a cross-cultural and transregional lens.

Imagining Southern Spaces: Hemispheric and Transatlantic Souths in Antebellum US Writings

By Deniz Bozkurt-Pekár. Let me set the scene: A rich meadow expanding by the bountiful river, a gentleman leaning on the white column of the porch of a haint-blue mansion, a pale-white lady in flamboyant attire sitting on a rocking-chair behind him, away from them yet within their eyesight are the cotton, corn, or tobacco fields hiding behind their crop the tired bodies of black men, women, and children.

The National Frame: Art and State Violence in Turkey and Germany

By Banu Karaca. The National Frame emerged out of my long-term interest in art, aesthetics and politics. I have always been fascinated by the dominant notion that art is inherently good, by the many values that are accorded to art – be it that art furthers individual agency and critical faculties, the emancipatory potential of art, or its civilizing impact – and the realities that shape the daily workings of the art world.

Refugees in African History

An interview with Marcia Schenck, Professor of Global History at the University of Potsdam, on her newly founded H-Net cross-network project “Refugees in African History”: „Historicizing the refugee experience is crucial to understanding that refugees are not exceptions but integral to the rise of nation-states.“

The Sociality of Theory

By Francesco Anselmetti. A Flood in Baʿath Country, the 2003 documentary by Syrian filmmaker Omar Amiralay, opens with a stark confession on the director’s behalf. His career had begun in the early 1970s with a panegyric to the Baʿathist project of modernisation glorifying the construction of the Tabqa Dam on the Euphrates, near the northern Syrian city of Raqqa.