Planet History

Graduiertenkolleg 1876

Portrait of a Lady. ‚Real‘ women, ‚imagined‘ women and the development of female representation in Prehistoric Cyprus. A Lecture by Prof. Luca Bombardieri

A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

The research on the ancient concepts of human body holds an important place within the context of Graduiertenkolleg 1876, and it is in this light that on June 22nd 2017, Prof Luca Bombardieri, of the University of Turin, was invited as guest speaker for his expertise on Prehistoric female representations in Eastern Mediterranean cultures.

According to legend, it was from the clear waters of the island of Cyprus – precisely on the beach of Petra tou Romiou (Fig. 1) – that Aphrodite emerged. From Greek times to now, this association has been embedded into the collective imagination, but has it always been so? Was there something special about the way women were represented in Cyprus before they took the shape and features of the Aphrodite we all know?

Figure 1. Petra tou Romiou, the legendary birthplace of Aphrodite in Cyprus (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
Following a thread that starts around 4500 BC, Prof Luca Bombardieri’s lecture navigated through the many facets of the female figure in Cypriot Pre- and Protohistory, to find out whether this was indeed the „birthplace“ of the Goddess of Love. And, as often happens when dealing with ancient art, this paper posed the question to what degree these figures represent real women, ideals or deities.

The journey begins in the Chalcolithic settlement of Kissonerga Mosphilia with the discovery under a circular building of a foundation deposit. In a round basin together with a triton shell and pebble stones, a series of female figurines was unearthed. All of these appeared to be related to pregnancy, most of them showing large hips and bellies, some being supported by a stool, and finally, the figurine of a woman in the act of giving birth (Fig. 2). The connection between motherhood and women is an obvious one, but in Cypriot culture this appears to be stressed with particular fervour. 



Figure 2. Birth-giving terracotta figurine from the ritual deposit at Kissonerga Mosphilia. The Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).

In the following Early and Middle Bronze Age periods, we see a radical change in the ceramic traditions, economic practices and art. But the female representations, however stylistically different from the previous Chalcolithic, repeat the same motifs. In this period, whole village-life scenes decorate ceramic vessels in the form of plastic appliques. The agricultural revolution set in motion by the introduction of cattle-drawn plough is often reflected in these scenes, together with a set of activities related to the increased field productivity. And yet, in the midst of all these innovations, the woman-mother figure keeps her centrality (Fig. 3). The role that gender has in the separation of activities is not yet clear. On one hand, certain occupations, such as ploughing the fields, appear to be a male prerogative. But among the many activities represented in these scenes, most are performed by gender-neutral characters. Parallels from later periods seem to suggest that at least some of them – such as grinding flour or bread making – might have been denoted as traditionally feminine, but there is no definitive answer to the matter. 
 
Figure 3. Early Bronze Age jar with plastic decoration of a village-scene. At the centre, a woman holding an infant. The Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
At the end of the Early Cypriot a new type of statuette is introduced: the so-called Plank-shaped Figurine (Fig. 4) and its production would continue during the whole Middle Cypriot. The ones representing women multiply and a new element makes its appearance: the infant is no longer simply held in its mother’s arms, but is now always associated with a cradle. This association between motherhood and cradle is such that in two instances the cradle itself becomes a metaphor of the mother, with stylised arms holding the baby in place.
 
Figure 4. Plank shaped figurines at the Cyprus Museum, Nicosia (Photo by M. Yamasaki).
Although women are consistently depicted throughout Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze Age art, nothing suggests that these figures represent anything more than their role in prehistoric village communities. The matter concerning the plank-shaped figurines is more complicated. It is possible that these figurines were miniature versions of larger, wooden idols placed in sanctuaries, for which there are archaeological parallels in the Greek islands. Should that be the case, these may represent something more than real-life women, and may be closer to the representation of an idealised feminine, often maternal deity.

In the Late Bronze Age, we see a new influx of ideas and traditions from the Levant and the Aegean, and this is particularly evident in the coroplastic. The „bird-faced“ figurines, clearly show the stylistic influence of their Levantine counterparts, but again, the maternity element is central to the Cypriot versions (Fig. 5). As for the ones of Aegean inspiration, the raised arms and considering the fact that several of these figurines were found in sanctuary precincts, it seems plausible that they were ritually connotated, if not having been representations of deities themselves. 

 
Figure 5. Terracotta figurine of a woman with a child. The BritishMuseum, registry number 1897.0401.1087.
The one case where it is commonly agreed that such a female figurine does indeed represent a goddess is the Astarte on the Ingot (Fig. 6). The iconography is typical of the Levantine goddess, and it is generally assumed that here too, it represents a local variant of the fertility goddess that in later times developed into the Cypriot Aphrodite. The association of Astarte with metalwork has some interesting connections with the Greek myth and may further explain the appearance of the cult of Aphrodite on the island. Curiously, Homer narrates in the Odyssey that Aphrodite was married to the god of metallurgy, Hephaistos.
Figure 6. Bronze figurine of Astarte on the Ingot. Ashmolean Museum, registry number AN1971.888.
If the passage from Asterte on the Ingot to Aphrodite is relatively easy, more complex is to establish a direct correlation between this Astarte-Aphrodite and the millennia old Cypriot tradition of representations of women and maternity. Indeed, fertility may constitute such point of contact, but the gap between these two ideas of women is still open. The one thing that is certain is the centrality – either real, imagined or deified – of women and mothers throughout the entirety of Cypriot art history.

If you are interested, here you’ll find some suggestions for further reading:

Diane Bolger (Ed.), A Companion to Gender Prehistory (Chichester, England: Wiley Blackwell), 2013.
Luca Bombardieri, Tommaso Braccini and Silvia Romani (Eds.), Il Trono Variopinto. Figure e Forme della Dea dell’Amore (Edizioni dell’Orso: Roma), 2014.
Stephanie Budin, „Girl, woman, mother, goddess: Bronze Age Cypriot terracotta figurines“ in Medelhavsmuseet: Focus on the Mediterranean, Vol. 5, 2009.

„Kulturgüterschutz – Bewusstsein für unser gemeinsames Erbe“ SIAA Studierendenkonferenz, 10.-11.06.2017 (Mainz)

Ein Beitrag von Katharina Zartner.

Am Wochenende des 10. und 11. Juni 2017 fand in Mainz erstmals die interdisziplinäre SIAA Studierendenkonferenz unter dem Titel „Kulturgüterschutz – Bewusstsein für unser gemeinsames Erbe“ statt. Ein Thema, das aktueller nicht sein könnte und das vor allem im Bereich der Altertumswissenschaften eine große Rolle spielt. Die Konferenz fügte sich mit ihrer Thematik in die global angelegte Kampagne „unite4heritage“ der Unesco ein und leistete somit auch einen wertvollen Beitrag zu dem wichtigen Vorhaben, Menschen weltweit für das Thema Kulturgüterschutz zu sensibilisieren.

Abb. 1: Das Logo der „Studierendenkonferenz Innovative und Aktive Altertumswissenschaften Mainz“ (kurz SIAA). In der Mitte ist eine altägyptische Hieroglyphe zu sehen; diese trägt den Lautwert siA, was sich mit „Erkenntnis“ oder „Bewusstsein“ übersetzen lässt und den Grundgedanken des Kulturgüterschutzes versinnbildlichen soll.

Innovative Ideen und viel persönlicher Einsatz

Das Kürzel SIAA steht für „Studierendenkonferenz Innovative und Aktive Altertumswissenschaften Mainz“ (Abb. 1) und in eben diesem Sinne war die Konferenz auch gestaltet. Mit viel Herzblut haben zwei Masterstudentinnen sowie eine ehemalige Studentin mit abgeschlossenem Master aus dem Arbeitsbereich Ägyptologie des Instituts für Altertumswissenschaften der JGU Mainz die Konferenz geplant, organisiert und durchgeführt: Peggy Zogbaum, Isabel Steinhardt und Dana Jacoby. Den drei Organisatorinnen ist es zu verdanken, dass die Konferenz überhaupt zu Stande kam, professionell vorbereitet war und zu einem derartigen Erfolg wurde. Ein Jahr Vorbereitungszeit haben die drei jungen Frauen investiert, selbständig Gelder eingeworben, eine Website und Werbematerialien erstellt, Referenten eingeladen, das Programm zusammengestellt, für die Verpflegung der Teilnehmer gesorgt und vieles mehr. Das alles neben Studium und Beruf zu stemmen ist eine beachtliche Leistung.
Tag 1 der Konferenz begann mit den Grußworten von Univ.-Prof. Dr. Klaus Pietschmann (Prodekan des Fachbereichs 07 der JGU Mainz) und Univ.-Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening (Professorin der Ägyptologie am Institut für Altertumswissenschaften und Sprecherin des Graduiertenkollegs „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“), die die Aktualität und Brisanz der Thematik betonten und besonders die Eigeninitiative der Organisatorinnen herausstellten, sowie mit einer thematischen Einführung durch Univ.-Prof. Dr. Alexander Pruß (Professor für Vorderasiatische Archäologie am Institut für Altertumswissenschaften).

Kulturgüterschutz in Libyen und Ägypten

Den ersten Vortrag der Konferenz hielt Dr. Julia Nikolaus von der Universität Leicester bzw. Oxford zum Thema „Libyan Antiquities at Risk“ und berichtete über die Problematiken des illegalen Antikenhandels und der Zerstörung von Kulturgütern in Libyen. So werden antike Friedhöfe zerstört, indem sie rücksichtslos mit Straßen und Häusern überbaut werden; Reliefs und Statuen werden von Grabbauten abgeschlagen und landen auf dem Antikenmarkt. Frau Dr. Nikolaus und ihr Team bemühen sich um Aufklärung und Sensibilisierung sowohl der Antikenhändler als auch der lokalen Bevölkerung, um vor allem bei den jüngeren Generationen ein Bewusstsein für das kulturelle Erbe des Landes zu schaffen. Dies geschieht auf vorbildliche Weise in enger Zusammenarbeit mit den örtlichen Behörden. 
Im Anschluss daran referierte Hannah Sonbol, M.A. von der Freien Universität Berlin zum „Beitrag ägyptischer staatlicher Schulbücher zum Kulturgüterschutz“. Anhand von Beispielen aus den Büchern, die zur Pflichtlektüre eines jeden ägyptischen Schülers gehören, zeigte sie eindrücklich, dass das Thema Kulturgüterschutz nur im Licht wirtschaftlicher Interessen vermittelt wird. Die einzigartige Geschichte des Landes und die frühe ägyptische Hochkultur werden in hohem Maße instrumentalisiert und zur Militärverherrlichung genutzt; die Meinungsrichtung wird den Schülern in der Regel bereits durch die Formulierung der Fragen vorgegeben. Was fehlt, ist die Vermittlung von neutralem Wissen und das Bewusstsein für den kulturhistorischen Wert dieser Denkmäler. Als positives Beispiel für Aufklärungsarbeit dieser Art nannte Frau Sonbol die „Abteilung zur Kulturvermittlung und für Archäologie-Bewusstsein“ in Alexandrien, machte jedoch gleichzeitig deutlich, dass solche Projekte bisher leider die Ausnahme darstellen.

Aus der Sicht von Justitia

Im ersten Keynote-Vortrag beleuchtete Prof. Dr. Dr. hc. Kai Ambos aus Göttingen die Frage, ob und inwiefern das Völkerstrafrecht einen Beitrag zum Kulturgüterschutz leisten kann. Es wurde deutlich, dass die Rechtslage oft bei weitem nicht eindeutig ist, bspw. in der Frage, wann in Kriegszeiten die „militärische Notwendigkeit“ besteht, ein Kulturdenkmal zu zerstören oder nicht. So bleibt es nach einer solchen Zerstörung u.a. auch Ermessenssache, ob eine ausreichende „Schwere der Tat“ vorlag, die eine Verurteilung rechtfertigen würde. Als eine Art Präzedenzfall führte er die erstmalige strafrechtliche Verurteilung einer Person für die Zerstörung von Kulturgütern im Jahr 2016 an (sog. Al-Mahdi-Fall).

Parallelen zwischen Natur- und Kulturgüterschutz?!

Nach ausgiebiger Stärkung in der Mittagspause zog Jens Crueger, B.A. von der Universität Bremen interessante Parallelen zwischen Überlegungen aus dem Bereich des Natur-, Arten- und Tierschutzes und dem Feld des Kulturgüterschutzes. Vor allem im Hinblick auf das Stichwort Zukunftsbewusstsein und Sensibilisierung ist der Natur- und Umweltschutz in den letzten Jahrzehnten ein großes Stück vorangekommen und kann somit vielleicht als Orientierungshilfe im Prozess der Bewusstseinsbildung für die Notwendigkeit von Kulturgüterschutz dienen. 

Untrennbar verbunden: Archäologie und Kulturgüterschutz 

Auch das Graduiertenkolleg 1876 „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ war durch drei Doktorandinnen der Ägyptologie bzw. der Vorderasiatischen Archäologie mit einem Vortrag vertreten (Abb. 2). Unter dem Titel „Kulturgüterschutz im Archäologen-Alltag – Im Spannungsfeld zwischen Dokumentation, Erhaltung und Zerstörung“ gaben Sonja Speck, Mari Yamasaki und Katharina Zartner Einblicke in die tägliche Arbeit von Archäolog*innen und inwiefern der Kulturgüterschutz dabei eine Rolle spielt. In einem einführenden Teil ging Katharina Zartner darauf ein, inwiefern archäologisches Arbeiten immer auch mit Zerstörung (durch die Ausgrabungstätigkeit) verbunden ist und wie wichtig es daher ist, jeden Arbeitsschritt und jede kleinste Information gründlich zu dokumentieren, um so die Nachvollziehbarkeit von Erkenntnissen, die Erhaltung von Wissen und die Möglichkeit zur Rekonstruktion zu gewährleisten. Als Fallbeispiele für modernes archäologisches Arbeiten mit dem Fokus auf ebendiesen Zielen diente zum einen der Bericht von Mari Yamasaki über ein Land- und Unterwassersurvey auf Zypern (Agios Georgios Bay), bei dem Methoden wie Remote Sensing, Georadar und Geomagnetik zum Einsatz kommen und auf diese Weise große Areale zerstörungsfrei, zeitsparend und kostengünstig untersucht werden können. Zum anderen stellte Sonja Speck die Vorteile der 3D-Rekonstruktion von archäologischen Objekten mittels Photogrammetrie vor – speziell anhand eines von ihr mitentwickelten Geräts, das den Prozess der Fotoaufnahmen, z.B. von Siegeln oder Statuetten, standardisiert und erleichtert.

Abb. 2: Die GRK-Doktorandinnen Mari Yamasaki, Sonja Speck und Katharina Zartner werden von den Organisatorinnen Peggy Zogbaum und Dana Jacoby (v.l.n.r.) zu ihrem Vortrag zum „Kulturgüterschutz im Archäologen-Alltag“ begrüßt (Foto: Garzón Rodríguez).

Schatzsucher und Antikenhändler

Kriminalhauptkommissar Eckhard Laufer von der Abteilung für Kulturgüterschutz des Hessischen Landeskriminalamtes Wiesbaden hielt das Auditorium im spannenden zweiten Keynote-Vortrag mit dem Titel „Plündern und verkaufen, alles ’no problem‘?“ in Atem. Er erzählte aus seinem Arbeitsalltag, berichtete von Schatzsuchern und Sondengängern und bemängelte, dass die Strafen für Raubgräber und Hehler oft verschwindend gering ausfallen (als Beispiel nannte er den bekannten Fall der sog. Himmelsscheibe von Nebra). Herr Laufer erläuterte zudem den gesetzeskonformen Umgang mit archäologischen Funden und dass wohl kaum einer Privatperson bewusst sei, dass eine Meldepflicht auch für Objekte von privatem Grundbesitz besteht.
Der folgende dritte Keynote-Vortrag von Dr. Michael Müller-Karpe vom RGZM Mainz schloss sich thematisch direkt daran an. Unter dem Titel „Blutige Antiken: Von Raubgräbern, Hehlern – und Gesetzgebern“ machte er auf die Problematiken von Raubgrabungen „im großen Stil“ aufmerksam, wie sie unter anderem von der terroristischen Organisation „Islamischer Staat“ betrieben werden. Das Hauptproblem: Die Nachfrage bestimmt das Angebot – und traurigerweise besteht die Nachfrage bei reichen Sammlern aus aller Welt, wie die enormen Summen beweisen, die Antiken in den Auktionshäusern erzielen. Dr. Müller-Karpe sprach von einem „blutigen Markt“, der Terror und Krieg mit finanziellen Mitteln versorgt und forderte zu Recht umfassende Gesetzesänderungen, um dies zu stoppen.
Die Vorträge des ersten Tages haben alle deutlich gezeigt, dass an vielen Stellen Handlungsbedarf besteht. Bei der abschließenden Podiumsdiskussion waren sich Sprecher und Auditorium einig: Vor allem Öffentlichkeits- und Aufklärungsarbeit sowie eine allgemeine Sensibilisierung für das Thema Kulturgüterschutz sind dringend notwendig!

Bewusstsein schaffen – Beispiele aus der Praxis

Der zweite Tag der Konferenz war Beispielen aus der praktischen Arbeit gewidmet: Dr. Anna M. Kaiser vom Zentrum für Kulturgüterschutz der Donau-Universität Krems in Österreich berichtete von der erfolgreichen Durchführung einer Sommeruniversität, bei der ein Notfallplan zur Evakuierung von Kulturgütern erarbeitet und erfolgreich getestet wurde (z.B. für Museen im Falle einer Hochwasserkatastrophe). Ein weiteres Projekt zum Umgang mit Archiven in Krisensituationen ist geplant.

Anne Riedel, M.A. von der Ruhr-Universität Bochum sprach über „Denkmalrecht und Kulturgüterschutz – Ein Praxisbericht über interdisziplinäre Ansätze in der universitären Lehre“. In ihrem Vortrag berichtete sie über ein über mehrere Jahre hinweg weiterentwickeltes Unterrichtskonzept, das sich anhand von Fallbeispielen unter anderem mit den rechtlichen Grundlagen von Kulturgüterschutz beschäftigt, und über Chancen, Grenzen und die Notwendigkeit der Vermittlung solchen Wissens innerhalb verschiedener Studiengänge.

Margrith Kruip, M.A. vom Projekt HerA (Heritage Advisors, Beratung für Kulturgüterschutz Berlin) stellte mit viel Herzblut ihre Überlegungen zur „Grundlagenarbeit für den Kulturgüterschutz – Ideen für Fortbildung und Lehre“ vor. Ziel des jungen Teams ist ein verstärktes Bewusstsein für unser kulturelles Erbe und eine erhöhte Sensibilität für den Kulturgüterschutz in der Bevölkerung. Um dies zu erreichen bietet HerA Workshops und Vorträge zu verschiedenen Themenkomplexen und für verschiedene Zielgruppen an (z.B. für Polizei- und Zollbeamte, für Juristen, aber auch speziell für Studierende).

Raum für angeregte Diskussionen und neue Kontakte

Die beiden sog. Active Sessions boten dann noch einmal allen Konferenzbesuchern die Möglichkeit, ausgewählte Themen aus verschiedenen Blickwinkeln heraus zu diskutieren. So wurde im ersten Szenario die Frage in den Raum gestellt, ob man als Kurator eines großen Museums ein einzigartiges Objekt, dessen Provenienz allerdings ungeklärt ist, ankaufen würde oder nicht. Im zweiten Szenario fungierte das Auditorium als eine Gruppe von Richtern, die in einer imaginären „Gerichtsverhandlung“ den Fall des sog. Pyramidenkletterers von Giza verhandelten.

Den Abschluss der zweitägigen Konferenz bildete ein Sommerfest mit leckerem Essen, Getränken und der Möglichkeit, weiter ins Gespräch zu kommen. Dabei wurde deutlich, wie viel sich zum vielschichtigen und komplexen Thema Kulturgüterschutz noch sagen lässt, was es noch alles zu tun gibt und welch weiter Weg noch vor allen liegt, die sich für unser kulturelles Erbe einsetzen. Einen wichtigen und großen ersten Schritt auf diesem Weg hat die SIAA Konferenz bereits gemacht! Sie hat interessierte Leute aus verschiedenen Disziplinen zusammengebracht und so den Grundstein für eine künftige Zusammenarbeit und gemeinsame Projekte gelegt. Den drei Organisatorinnen sei an dieser Stelle noch einmal herzlich für ihren vorbildlichen Einsatz gedankt und zu einer rundum gelungenen, interessanten, aktuellen, professionellen und innovativen Veranstaltung gratuliert!

A Report of the First International Conference on Historical Medical Discourse, Milan

A weblog entry by Shahrzad Irannejad.

From June 14th to the 16th, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the University of Milan hosted the First International Conference on Historical Medical Discourse (CHIMED-1). The general interest of the conference concerned medical discourse in historical perspective across disciplinary fields and research areas, such as: historical linguistics; historical lexicology and lexicography; medicine in/and literature; history of science, medicine and medical thought; history and social function of medical institutions; popularization of medical thought; translation of medical texts; medicine and cultural attitudes; and medicine and society. I used this opportunity to share with experts how I am integrating Translation Theory and Historical Semantics in my PhD project and receive feedback. As there were parallel presentations and some presentations were in Italian (which I, unfortunately, do not speak), this report is by no means a comprehensive report of the entire event; rather, a report of the presentations I personally found relevant to my work.


Figure 1: Giuliana Garzone and Paola Catenaccio presenting their paper in a panel chaired by Dr. Elisabetta Lonati in the Napoleonica hall of the University of Milan (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

On the first day, Giuliana Garzone and Paola Catenaccio (Milan) talked about „Disseminating medical knowledge in the 19th century: discourse analytical perspectives“ (Fig. 1). They discussed the frequency of occurrence, collocation and concordances of their selected terms „knowledge“, „experience“, „theory“, and „evidence“ in their corpus, which was based on three major medical texts in the 19th century. They also discussed the structures of the three texts and stressed the importance of analyzing the introductions of the texts. Eleonora Ravizza (Bergamo) discussed „Colonialism and cultural hybridity at the intersection of medical and literary discourse“. The underlying theme of her presentation was the notion that our experience of our physical body is mediated through language and is thus socially and culturally charged. She also discussed the relationship between disease and foreignness and drew on Susan Sontag’s Illness as Metaphor. The first day ended in a very interesting social event, in which we visited the archives of the Ca‘ Granda Hospital which housed many medical documents and objects going as far back as the 11th century (Fig. 2 and 3).

 


Figure 2 and 3: Visit to the archives of the Ca‘ Granda Hospital (Photos by Shahrzad Irannejad).


In day two of the conference, Lucia Berti (Milan) presented her paper entitled „Italy and the Royal Society: medical papers in the early Philosophical Transactions“ based on her current PhD project. After introducing the Philosophical Transactions as important sources for the study of Anglo-Italian relations in the 17th century and after some theoretical background regarding her approaches to text analysis, she analyzed 23 medical papers written between 1665-1706, and discussed their language, genre, subject area, structure, and linguistic features. Elisabetta Lonati (Milan) talked about „Diffusing medical knowledge among the people: the socio-cultural function of medical writing“. She examined the introduction of her primary sources and went on to discuss the attitude in the sources towards the relationship between intelligibility of medical texts and their utility. Tatiana Canziani and Marianna Lya Zummo (Palermo) presented their paper entitled „Prefaces in medical dictionaries: from moves to rhetorical Analysis“. They dissected eleven medical dictionaries published 1809-1900 and discussed the rhetorical structure of their prefaces and introductions. Based on the audiences presumed for these dictionaries, they discussed the socio-cultural practices and assumptions embedded in these texts.
 
Massimo Sturiale (Catania) talked about „Pronouncing medical terms: norm and usage in pronouncing dictionaries“. Focusing on four main pronouncing dictionaries from the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, he discussed and compared various examples of stress placement, spelling and pronunciations presented in these dictionaries. Alessandra Vicentini (Insubria) presented „A brief history of 19th-century English medical lexicography: authors, editors and texts“. After giving some background about the scientific context of these dictionaries, in which she discussed the dramatic increase in specialized terminology which necessitated the publishing of dictionaries, she analyzed the needs, motivations and actors involved in compilation of five major dictionaries compiled in the 19th century.

In an attempt to implement one of the suggestions raised in our previous workshop on delivering public speeches in English at our RTG, I began my presentation with a story; especially because I was the last presenter in a long conference day: I had found mention of the theory of Inner Senses and Ventricular Localization in one of the stories of One Thousand and One Nights, recounted by Shahrazad the legendary storyteller. I think you can imagine my excitement as I came across this story. I received good feedback after my presentation (Fig. 4); members of the audience saying how the story helped them find relevance to my presentation and my research. I took as my departure point an 18th century Persian medical encyclopedia which mentions the theory of the Inner Senses. I then went back in time and showed how the expansion and development in the Aristotelian concepts of phantasia and koine aisthesis yielded the five inner senses described in this text. Using Historical Semantics and Translation Theory, I tried to show how transliteration, calque and translation of Greek terms yielded the Arabic, and later Persian, terminology that explained sensation, cognition and its impairment in the pre-modern Persianate world.




Figure 4:  The last speaker of the day trying to allure the audience with a story by Shahrazad; I promise my gesture in this scene was not pre-contemplated (Photo by Lucia Berti).



On the third day, Silvia Demo (Padova) talked about reception of Galen in Nicholas Culpeper’s work in her talk „What medicine is. Galens Art of Physick“. She presented and analyzed Culpeper’s translation of Galen’s famous book. She drew attention to the fact that Culpeper inserts his own comments in the translation, and that he adjusts some recipes based on the ingredients available to his English reader. In a quite engaging presentation, Paul-Arthur Tortosa (Florence) talked about „Tables and Content: the writing practices of French military doctors between case-study and arithmetic medicine, 1792-1800“. He introduced two major texts that explicitly discussed the emergence of the medical discourse, namely, Michel Foucault’s The Birth of the Clinic (1963) and Erwin Heinz Ackerknecht’s Medicine at the Paris Hospital, 1794-1848 (1967). His talk circled around the notion that medical lists and tables emerging in the 18th century made medicine look more „rational“. He discussed how massification of warfare in this century caused reconfiguration of medical writing practices.

In the end, organizers of the conference Prof. Giovanni Iamartino and Dr. Elisabetta Lonati concluded the event by thanking all those involved in organizing the event, especially Lucia Berti, PhD candidate at the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature. They concluded by saying that they hope that the Conference on Historical Medical Discourse would continue to be held in the future. There is a prospect of this happening biannually, in Helsinki and Canary Islands in the near future. I, too, hope this future would soon be realized. 

 

Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Mari Yamasaki: „Concepts of Seascapes and Marine Fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age“

Ein Beitrag von Katharina Zartner.
 
Am 01. Juni 2017 hat unsere Kollegin Mari Yamasaki ihr im letzten Herbst begonnenes Dissertationsprojekt mit dem Titel „Evolving concepts of seascapes and marine fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Bronze Age“ im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des Graduiertenkollegs vorgestellt. Sowohl den Professor*innen des Trägerkreises als auch den anderen Kollegiat*innen gewährte sie dabei interessante Einblicke in den aktuellen Stand ihrer Arbeit, ihre Methodik sowie in das weitere geplante Vorgehen und die Ziele des Dissertationsvorhabens.
 

Fragestellungen und Zielsetzung

Direkt zu Beginn ihres Vortrages nahm Mari Yamasaki eine mögliche kritische Frage vorweg: Warum ist es überhaupt gerechtfertigt, noch einmal zu „seascapes“ zu arbeiten, wurde das Thema doch in letzter Zeit in zahlreichen Untersuchungen bearbeitet? Doch gerade die Beschäftigung mit diesen neueren Abhandlungen macht nicht nur deutlich, welche Fortschritte in den letzten Jahrzehnten erzielt wurden, sondern auch, dass noch Lücken innerhalb dieses Forschungsfeldes bestehen. Daher wirft Mari Yamasaki in ihrem Dissertationsprojekt teils grundlegende und bisher unbeantwortete, teils weiterführende und teils gänzliche neue Fragen auf, so zum Beispiel:
 
Was ist überhaupt eine Küste? Diese Frage ist bei weitem nicht so simpel zu beantworten, wie es im ersten Moment vielleicht scheinen mag. Zunächst müssen Kriterien herausgearbeitet werden, die entsprechend der antiken Weltsicht charakteristisch für eine Küste sind und an denen sich somit ein entsprechendes zugrunde liegendes Konzept festmachen lässt. Um solche Kriterien zu definieren, muss die Frage gestellt werden, wie die Landschaft entlang der Küste und das Meer selbst von den Menschen, die dort lebten, wahrgenommen wurden und wie diese mit und in ihrer Umwelt (inter-)agierten. Besonders das Eingreifen in die maritime Landschaft sowie die Nutzung und Ausbeutung von Ressourcen und lokaler Fauna stehen dabei im Fokus. Der geographische Rahmen dieser Untersuchung wird durch jene Staaten und Gesellschaften abgesteckt, die während der Bronzezeit (ca. 2500–1000 v. Chr., mit Fokus auf dem 2. Jt. v. Chr.) direkt am Handel im östlichen Mittelmeerraum beteiligt waren: Ägypten, das Reich von Hatti, der mykenische Kulturkreis sowie die Stadtstaaten entlang der Levante-Küste. In den Blick genommen werden dabei insbesondere die Küstensiedlungen, die eine entscheidende Rolle bei der Entstehung dieses (Handels-)Netzwerkes spielten. Welche Beziehungen bestanden zwischen diesen Siedlungen untereinander, welche Art von Austausch fand zwischen ihnen statt und inwiefern fungierten sie als Vermittler gegenüber dem Landesinneren? Schließlich stellt sich natürlich die wohl wichtigste Frage: Wie lässt sich all das im archäologischen Befund fassen?

 

Ein rätselhafter Fisch – Die Materialgrundlage

Die zuletzt gestellte Frage leitet direkt über zur Materialgrundlage: Welche Quellen können zur Beantwortung der aufgeworfenen Fragen herangezogen werden? Mari Yamasaki wertet für ihre Untersuchung verschiedene Materialgruppen aus: zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, bildliche Darstellungen sowie Schriftquellen. Im aktuellen Stadium der Arbeit setzt sie sich verstärkt mit den ersten beiden Gattungen auseinander, während die beiden letztgenannten zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt ausgewertet werden sollen.
 
Das zooarchäologische Material, d.h. die in archäologischen Kontexten erhaltenen Überreste der antiken Fauna, setzt sich im Bereich der Küstensiedlungen v.a. aus Fischknochen, Muscheln und Überresten der sog. Murex-Schnecken, aus deren Sekret man in der Antike Purpur als Färbemittel gewann, zusammen. Die systematische Erfassung dieser Daten (biologische Klasse/Familie/Spezies, Menge, Fundort, Fundkontext usw.) anhand von publizierten Ausgrabungsberichten ist eine kleinteilige Arbeit, die sich jedoch schließlich auszahlt. Bei den vergleichenden Auswertungen des gesammelten Datenmaterials lassen sich beispielsweise Aussagen über die Verbreitung bestimmter Arten treffen. Als eindrückliches Beispiel lässt sich der rätselhafte Fall des Lates niloticus anführen, des sog. Viktoriabarsches aus der Familie der Riesenbarsche. Knochen dieser auch bei uns heute beliebten Speisefischart finden sich an zahlreichen der untersuchten Küstenfundorte. Doch warum sind Fischknochen am Meer ein so ungewöhnlicher Fund? Ein anderer Name für diese Fischart liefert einen Hinweis: Nilbarsch. Denn es handelt sich beim Lates niloticus keineswegs um eine im Mittelmeer heimische Art, sondern um einen Süßwasserfisch, der in Flüssen, bspw. im Nil in Ägypten, beheimatet ist. Da die Fischknochen in solch auffälliger Quantität gefunden wurden, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass diese spezielle Art in größeren Mengen importiert wurde. Warum ein derartiger Aufwand für die Beschaffung einer bestimmten Fischart betrieben wurde, obwohl das Mittelmeer doch ausreichend Möglichkeiten zum Fischfang bot, ist eine der vielen interessanten weiterführenden Fragen, die sich bei der Betrachtung des Materials ergeben und auf die es Antworten zu finden gilt. Einen Hinweis liefert möglicherweise ein in Hala Sultan Teke (Zypern) gefundener Krater, der die Darstellung von mehreren Fischen zeigt. Noch ist die abgebildete Art nicht eindeutig identifiziert, doch könnte es sich dabei ebenfalls um Nilbarsche handeln.

Daten aus erster Hand: Archäologische Feldforschung

Mari Yamasaki verwendet für ihre Studie nicht nur bereits veröffentliche Daten, sondern hat außerdem die einzigartige Möglichkeit, Forschungsdaten aus erster Hand einfließen zu lassen. Bereits seit mehreren Jahren ist sie Teil eines internationalen Teams, das im Rahmen des Moni Pyrgos Pentakomo Monagroulli Survey Projektes (kurz: MPM) der Universität Chieti-Pescara (Italien) auf Zypern archäologische Untersuchungen der Küstenlandschaft mittels Surveys/geo-archäologischer Prospektion an Land und unter Wasser durchführt: Ziel des Projektes ist es zum einen festzustellen, inwiefern sich die Nutzung und Ausbeutung der maritimen bzw. der Küstenlandschaft über die Jahrtausende hinweg veränderten, denn Spuren menschlicher Aktivitäten lassen sich in diesem Bereich bereits für das Neolithikum nachweisen. Welches Potential der Nutzung bestand überhaupt zu welcher Zeit und wie wurde mit den bestehenden Ressourcen umgegangen? (Im Blog-Beitrag vom 05.06.2017 berichtet Mari Yamasaki von ihrem Aufenthalt auf Zypern im Mai, von den jüngsten Ergebnissen des Projektes, inwiefern menschliches Eingreifen in die Küstenlandschaften auch ein ganz aktuelles Thema ist und wie dies die Arbeit der Archäolog*innen vor Ort beeinflusst.) Die Untersuchungen ergaben, dass sich der Verlauf der Küstenlinie im Laufe der Zeit stark verändert hat. Besonders interessant ist in diesem Zusammenhang auch, dass im untersuchten Gebiet ein Fluss direkt ins Mittelmeer mündet, was der antiken Bevölkerung zusätzliche Möglichkeiten der ökonomischen Nutzung bot.
Für Mari Yamasaki ergibt sich durch die Mitarbeit in diesem innovativen und engagierten Projekt die Möglichkeit, wichtige Erkenntnisse über die Rezeption der maritimen Umwelt im Küstenbereich zu gewinnen und diese auch vor Ort selbst nachzuvollziehen. Die Ergebnisse der landschaftsarchäologischen Untersuchungen bilden einen wichtigen Baustein für das Dissertationsprojekt, der in der Zusammenschau mit den anderen untersuchten Quellen (zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, ikonographische sowie textliche Belege) schließlich ein Gesamtbild der antiken Konzeption von und der Interaktion mit den „seascapes“ bieten wird.

Vorstellung des Dissertationsprojekts von Mari Yamasaki: „Concepts of Seascapes and Marine Fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age“

Ein Beitrag von Katharina Zartner.
 
Am 01. Juni 2017 hat unsere Kollegin Mari Yamasaki ihr im letzten Herbst begonnenes Dissertationsprojekt mit dem Titel „Evolving concepts of seascapes and marine fauna in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Bronze Age“ im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des Graduiertenkollegs vorgestellt. Sowohl den Professor*innen des Trägerkreises als auch den anderen Kollegiat*innen gewährte sie dabei interessante Einblicke in den aktuellen Stand ihrer Arbeit, ihre Methodik sowie in das weitere geplante Vorgehen und die Ziele des Dissertationsvorhabens.
 

Fragestellungen und Zielsetzung

Direkt zu Beginn ihres Vortrages nahm Mari Yamasaki eine mögliche kritische Frage vorweg: Warum ist es überhaupt gerechtfertigt, noch einmal zu „seascapes“ zu arbeiten, wurde das Thema doch in letzter Zeit in zahlreichen Untersuchungen bearbeitet? Doch gerade die Beschäftigung mit diesen neueren Abhandlungen macht nicht nur deutlich, welche Fortschritte in den letzten Jahrzehnten erzielt wurden, sondern auch, dass noch Lücken innerhalb dieses Forschungsfeldes bestehen. Daher wirft Mari Yamasaki in ihrem Dissertationsprojekt teils grundlegende und bisher unbeantwortete, teils weiterführende und teils gänzliche neue Fragen auf, so zum Beispiel:
 
Was ist überhaupt eine Küste? Diese Frage ist bei weitem nicht so simpel zu beantworten, wie es im ersten Moment vielleicht scheinen mag. Zunächst müssen Kriterien herausgearbeitet werden, die entsprechend der antiken Weltsicht charakteristisch für eine Küste sind und an denen sich somit ein entsprechendes zugrunde liegendes Konzept festmachen lässt. Um solche Kriterien zu definieren, muss die Frage gestellt werden, wie die Landschaft entlang der Küste und das Meer selbst von den Menschen, die dort lebten, wahrgenommen wurden und wie diese mit und in ihrer Umwelt (inter-)agierten. Besonders das Eingreifen in die maritime Landschaft sowie die Nutzung und Ausbeutung von Ressourcen und lokaler Fauna stehen dabei im Fokus. Der geographische Rahmen dieser Untersuchung wird durch jene Staaten und Gesellschaften abgesteckt, die während der Bronzezeit (ca. 2500–1000 v. Chr., mit Fokus auf dem 2. Jt. v. Chr.) direkt am Handel im östlichen Mittelmeerraum beteiligt waren: Ägypten, das Reich von Hatti, der mykenische Kulturkreis sowie die Stadtstaaten entlang der Levante-Küste. In den Blick genommen werden dabei insbesondere die Küstensiedlungen, die eine entscheidende Rolle bei der Entstehung dieses (Handels-)Netzwerkes spielten. Welche Beziehungen bestanden zwischen diesen Siedlungen untereinander, welche Art von Austausch fand zwischen ihnen statt und inwiefern fungierten sie als Vermittler gegenüber dem Landesinneren? Schließlich stellt sich natürlich die wohl wichtigste Frage: Wie lässt sich all das im archäologischen Befund fassen?

 

Ein rätselhafter Fisch – Die Materialgrundlage

Die zuletzt gestellte Frage leitet direkt über zur Materialgrundlage: Welche Quellen können zur Beantwortung der aufgeworfenen Fragen herangezogen werden? Mari Yamasaki wertet für ihre Untersuchung verschiedene Materialgruppen aus: zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, bildliche Darstellungen sowie Schriftquellen. Im aktuellen Stadium der Arbeit setzt sie sich verstärkt mit den ersten beiden Gattungen auseinander, während die beiden letztgenannten zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt ausgewertet werden sollen.
 
Das zooarchäologische Material, d.h. die in archäologischen Kontexten erhaltenen Überreste der antiken Fauna, setzt sich im Bereich der Küstensiedlungen v.a. aus Fischknochen, Muscheln und Überresten der sog. Murex-Schnecken, aus deren Sekret man in der Antike Purpur als Färbemittel gewann, zusammen. Die systematische Erfassung dieser Daten (biologische Klasse/Familie/Spezies, Menge, Fundort, Fundkontext usw.) anhand von publizierten Ausgrabungsberichten ist eine kleinteilige Arbeit, die sich jedoch schließlich auszahlt. Bei den vergleichenden Auswertungen des gesammelten Datenmaterials lassen sich beispielsweise Aussagen über die Verbreitung bestimmter Arten treffen. Als eindrückliches Beispiel lässt sich der rätselhafte Fall des Lates niloticus anführen, des sog. Viktoriabarsches aus der Familie der Riesenbarsche. Knochen dieser auch bei uns heute beliebten Speisefischart finden sich an zahlreichen der untersuchten Küstenfundorte. Doch warum sind Fischknochen am Meer ein so ungewöhnlicher Fund? Ein anderer Name für diese Fischart liefert einen Hinweis: Nilbarsch. Denn es handelt sich beim Lates niloticus keineswegs um eine im Mittelmeer heimische Art, sondern um einen Süßwasserfisch, der in Flüssen, bspw. im Nil in Ägypten, beheimatet ist. Da die Fischknochen in solch auffälliger Quantität gefunden wurden, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass diese spezielle Art in größeren Mengen importiert wurde. Warum ein derartiger Aufwand für die Beschaffung einer bestimmten Fischart betrieben wurde, obwohl das Mittelmeer doch ausreichend Möglichkeiten zum Fischfang bot, ist eine der vielen interessanten weiterführenden Fragen, die sich bei der Betrachtung des Materials ergeben und auf die es Antworten zu finden gilt. Einen Hinweis liefert möglicherweise ein in Hala Sultan Teke (Zypern) gefundener Krater, der die Darstellung von mehreren Fischen zeigt. Noch ist die abgebildete Art nicht eindeutig identifiziert, doch könnte es sich dabei ebenfalls um Nilbarsche handeln.

Daten aus erster Hand: Archäologische Feldforschung

Mari Yamasaki verwendet für ihre Studie nicht nur bereits veröffentliche Daten, sondern hat außerdem die einzigartige Möglichkeit, Forschungsdaten aus erster Hand einfließen zu lassen. Bereits seit mehreren Jahren ist sie Teil eines internationalen Teams, das im Rahmen des Moni Pyrgos Pentakomo Monagroulli Survey Projektes (kurz: MPM) der Universität Chieti-Pescara (Italien) auf Zypern archäologische Untersuchungen der Küstenlandschaft mittels Surveys/geo-archäologischer Prospektion an Land und unter Wasser durchführt: Ziel des Projektes ist es zum einen festzustellen, inwiefern sich die Nutzung und Ausbeutung der maritimen bzw. der Küstenlandschaft über die Jahrtausende hinweg veränderten, denn Spuren menschlicher Aktivitäten lassen sich in diesem Bereich bereits für das Neolithikum nachweisen. Welches Potential der Nutzung bestand überhaupt zu welcher Zeit und wie wurde mit den bestehenden Ressourcen umgegangen? (Im Blog-Beitrag vom 05.06.2017 berichtet Mari Yamasaki von ihrem Aufenthalt auf Zypern im Mai, von den jüngsten Ergebnissen des Projektes, inwiefern menschliches Eingreifen in die Küstenlandschaften auch ein ganz aktuelles Thema ist und wie dies die Arbeit der Archäolog*innen vor Ort beeinflusst.) Die Untersuchungen ergaben, dass sich der Verlauf der Küstenlinie im Laufe der Zeit stark verändert hat. Besonders interessant ist in diesem Zusammenhang auch, dass im untersuchten Gebiet ein Fluss direkt ins Mittelmeer mündet, was der antiken Bevölkerung zusätzliche Möglichkeiten der ökonomischen Nutzung bot.
Für Mari Yamasaki ergibt sich durch die Mitarbeit in diesem innovativen und engagierten Projekt die Möglichkeit, wichtige Erkenntnisse über die Rezeption der maritimen Umwelt im Küstenbereich zu gewinnen und diese auch vor Ort selbst nachzuvollziehen. Die Ergebnisse der landschaftsarchäologischen Untersuchungen bilden einen wichtigen Baustein für das Dissertationsprojekt, der in der Zusammenschau mit den anderen untersuchten Quellen (zooarchäologisches Material, Importgüter, ikonographische sowie textliche Belege) schließlich ein Gesamtbild der antiken Konzeption von und der Interaktion mit den „seascapes“ bieten wird.

Craven Seminar zum Thema „Eschatology and Apocalpyse in Graeco-Roman Literature“ vom 1. bis 3. Juni 2017 an der University of Cambridge

Ein Beitrag von Dominic Bärsch.

Bei bestem englischem Wetter fand vom 01. bis 03.06.2017 an der University of Cambridge das Craven Seminar zum Thema „Eschatology and Apocalpyse in Graeco-Roman Literature“ statt. Während dieser Konferenz setzten sich ausgewiesene Experten auf dem Gebiet der griechisch-römischen Kosmologie, Philosophie und Theologie mit der zentralen Frage auseinander, ob und welche Art von Apokalyptik – besonders in Bezug auf die Vorstellung eines oder mehrerer Weltuntergänge – in der griechischen und lateinischen Literatur der Antike nachzuweisen sind. Die Diskussion fokussierte sich dabei besonders auf die folgenden Schwerpunktfragen: Warum sprechen Texte von einem „gemeinsamen Schicksal von Menschen und Welt“? In welchen literarischen und historischen Kontexten werden diese Themen aufgeworfen? Wer sind die Figuren oder Personen, die Anteil an einem „apokalyptischen Diskurs“ nehmen?

Nach einer herzlichen Begrüßung der Veranstalter begann das erste Panel mit dem Überthema „Political Eschatologies“. Dieses wurde von Richard Seaford (Exeter) eröffnet, der während seines Vortrags „Eschatology and the polis: the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Aeschylus, and Aristophanes“ konstatierte, dass die frühe griechische Kultur keine „mythology of the end of days“ formuliert hat. Als Begründung dafür führte er besonders an, dass die Wiederholung bestimmter ritueller Handlungen wohl zu einem zyklischen Bewusstsein von Weltzeit geführt habe und Krisensituationen stets in der Überwindung dieser Krise geführt wurden, anstatt ein Ende zu imaginieren. Im darauffolgenden Vortrag „Sibylline Apocalypse“ setzte sich Helen Van Noorden (Cambridge) mit der Gattung der Sibyllinischen Orakel auseinander und präsentierte die in Katastrophennarrativen transportierten Anspielungen auf historische Umstände. In Ergänzung zu ihr präsentierte Stephen Oakley (Cambridge) in seinem Vortrag „The Tiburtine Sibyl“ ein Beispiel der Rezeption einer antiken Sibylle, die als pagane Prophetin auch über die Antike hinaus als autoritativer Argumentationspunkt genutzt wurde.
 
Im anschließenden, kleinen Panel „Junior scholars‘ presentations“ erhielt Dominic Bärsch neben Jonathan Griffiths (Heidelberg) die Möglichkeit, einige Aspekte seiner Dissertation zu präsentieren und Rückmeldungen zu erhalten. Zunächst erläuterte Jonathan Griffiths in seinem Vortrag „kosmos agêrôs kai anosos: The Indestructibility of the World in Plato’s Timaeus“ seine Erkenntnisse zur Kosmologie im platonischen Timaios, wobei er sich vor allem auf die kosmogonischen Passagen und deren Auswirkungen für die platonische Philosophie konzentrierte. Geradezu entgegengesetzt in Sprache und Zeit fokussierte Dominic Bärsch in seinem Vortrag „To Pray or not to Pray for the End – Tertullian’s Statements about the End of the World“ den christlichen, lateinischen Apologeten Tertullian, der sich in seinen Werken mit Blick auf den Rezipientenkreis entweder dafür ausspricht, für einen Aufschub des Weltuntergangs oder für ein baldiges Eintreten dieser komischen Katastrophe zu beten. Die folgende Diskussion – wie die Tagung generell – brachte wertvolle Anregungen, nicht nur zu diesem, sondern zu den verschiedensten Teilen seiner Forschung.
 
Das zweite Großpanel der Konferenz mit dem Titel „Roman prophets and world history“ bestritt zunächst Katharina Volk (New York) und setzte sich in ihrem Vortrag „Not the End of the World? Omens and Prophecies at the Fall of the Roman Republic“ mit der spätrepublikanischen Literatur und der Interpretation verschiedener Omina und deren Bezug auf den römischen Bürgerkrieg auseinander. Passend dazu folgte ihr Alessandro Schiesaro (Manchester), dessen Vortrag „Virgil’s underworld between Lucretius and Freud“ vor allem die Passagen zum Weltuntergang in Lukrezens De rerum natura thematisierten, die ein Herzstück der römisch-apokalyptischen Literatur darstellen. Mit einem Schritt hin zur augusteischen Literatur rundete schließlich Elena Giusti (Cambridge) mit ihrem Vortrag „The End is the Beginning is the End: Apocalyptic Beginnings in Augustan Poetry“ ab. Die augusteischen Dichter, in ihrem Bestreben das imperium sine fine der augusteischen Ideologie literarisch abzubilden, imaginierten den Weltuntergang als eine Katastrophe, die in Form des Bürgerkrieges bereits eingetreten sei und aus der sich wiederum das neue „goldene Zeitalter“ erhebe, in dem sie nun selbst lebten.
 
Am Freitagnachmittag wurden dann im Panel „Revelations of individual and universal destiny“ besonders Fragen zu antiken Vorstellungen von Individualeschatologien aufgeworfen. Zu diesem Themenkomplex präsentierte zunächst Christoph Riedweg (Zürich) in seinem Vortrag „Pythagorean ideas about the afterlife“ Aspekte der pythagoreischen Seelenlehre, die nach wie vor schwer zu rekonstruieren ist. Ergänzend dazu beschäftigte sich Alex Long (St. Andrews) in seinem Vortrag „Platonic myths, the soul and its intra-cosmic future“ mit der platonischen Seelenlehre, wobei in der Diskussion der beiden Vorträge spannende Erkenntnisse zu Überlappungen und Differenzen der Konzepte konstatiert wurden. In die lateinische Literatur führten dagegen wieder die Vorträge von Francesca Romana Berno (Rom) „Apocalypse is everyday. Lucretius, Nero, and the End of the World in Seneca“ sowie von Katharine Earnshaw (Exeter) „Lucanian eschatology: from bones to the stars“, die den Blick auf die neronische Literatur richteten. Sowohl Seneca als auch Lucan präsentieren gewaltige Imaginationen des Weltendes, die jeweils eine besondere Funktion im Kontext ihrer Werke erfüllen.
 
Der die Konferenz abschließende Samstag war schließlich auf das Thema „Influence on Christian thought“ ausgerichtet, wobei sich lediglich Catherine Pickstock (Cambridge) mit ihrem Vortrag „Christian apocalypse as a version of Platonic philosophy“ diesem komplexen Bereich widmete. In der anschließenden Diskussion wurden jedoch spannende Fragen zum Thema der Rezeption und Adaptation paganer Konzepte angeschnitten. Den letzten Vortrag der Konferenz mit dem Titel „Last Laughs“ bestritt schließlich Rebecca Lämmle, die sich mit den Totengesprächen Lucians und dessen Rezeption früherer Unterweltsnarrative auseinandersetzte, wobei im Anschluss ausgiebig darüber diskutiert wurde, inwieweit die fiktiven Dialoge zwischen den Toten eine pessimistische Anschauung zu Leben und Tod transportierten.

Die abrundende Abschlussdiskussion rief noch einmal die eingangs diskutierten Fragen auf, wobei schnell klar wurde, dass in bestimmten Teilen der antiken Literatur eindeutig ein „apokalyptischer Diskurs“ zu erkennen ist, der besonders in Zeiten von Krisen und Katastrophen aufgerufen wird. Kontextuell ist dieser stets eingebettet und wird nie abstrahiert dargestellt, etwa in einer reinen Theorie des Weltuntergangs.

An dieser Stelle sei einerseits besonders den Veranstaltern des Craven Seminars Helen Van Noorden und Richard Hunter gedankt, die es mir ermöglichten, an dieser gewinnbringenden und anspruchsvollen Tagung teilzunehmen. Andererseits sei auch dem Graduiertenkolleg 1876 gedankt, das die finanzielle Unterstützung bereitgestellt hat, um diese Teilnahme zu ermöglichen.
 

Endangered coastscapes in Cyprus

A Weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

 

Cloudy, a light drizzle, and un-seasonally cold. I don’t remember ever having to wear long sleeves in Cyprus in May … and at noon no less! These were my thoughts as I waited for the project director, Prof. Oliva Menozzi, to pick me up at the bus stop on the day of my arrival on May 22nd. She arrived shortly after, we exchanged the customary Italian hugs and kisses and drove to meet the rest of the team at the „dig house“ in Germasogeia. I looked around the place and almost failed to recognize what should have been a familiar neighbourhood. Professor Menozzi turned to me, easily guessing my thoughts: in less than one year they built at new nondescript cottage and around us I could see two construction sites for bigger, duller, holiday-apartment buildings (Fig. 1). Not too long ago, this area used to be a village of a few sparse houses near the city, now it is impossible to tell it apart from the sprawling outskirts of Limassol. Sadly, Germasogeia is not an isolated example. Urbanization and reckless development are a problem almost everywhere along the Cypriot coasts. Within the MPM Survey Project (Moni Pyrgos Pentakomo Monagroulli Survey Project, University of Chieti), the preservation of cultural heritage has always been a high priority on the agenda, and fieldwork was always carried out with an eye out for evidences of looting and suspicious activities by developers, which were always reported to the officer of the Department of Antiquities in Limassol.


Figure 1: Satellite photograph of the area surrounding the dig house in 2016 and in 2017 (Photo ©GoogleEarth).

I have been coming to Cyprus for some years now, cooperating with several projects with different objectives. Among these, MPM holds a special place in my heart for a number of reasons, both academic and not. I was first involved with this team because of my research interest in ancient Mediterranean coastscapes: their surveying strategies, and especially their underwater survey project, strongly appealed to me. Luckily, they were looking for a diving-archaeologist and I was offered to co-supervise the diving team and full access to all data. As if all these positives were not enough, the warmth and cheerfulness of the team and their director won me over, and I can now count myself as an established asset of the MPM Project. This time my stay in Cyprus was also made possible by the funding received from the Research Training Group 1876 of Mainz University. For this trip, I only stayed for a relatively short time to continue the underwater work on a site that we individuated the previous year.
After spending the first day setting up the „base“ with all the necessary equipment, on 23rd of May we started the actual fieldwork – and not without setbacks. After we drove to the survey area covering the municipalities of Moni, Pyrgos, Monagrouli and Pentakomo, the land and the underwater archaeologists (among whom, myself – Fig. 2) split up to reach their respective fields. Unfortunately, due to the storms that rocked the island during the past few days, work proceeded slower than scheduled. The unusually unfavourable marine conditions hampered the underwater excavation, which could not take place as programmed. Our site is located on the collapsed cliff rocks at a very shallow depth, well within the reach of the wave undertow: working in such conditions could put both the material and the divers in danger and only limited test soundings were made when possible.
Figure 2: The diving and snorkelling team (Photo courtesy of MPM Survey Project, University of Chieti).

The weather improved after the first three days and thanks to the rise in outside temperatures and despite the strong current and cold water, it was at least possible to continue the aquatic survey for the full length of the bay, which was originally scheduled for next October, instead of the actual excavation. Due to the changes in plans of the underwater mission, the ground team also redirected their efforts to survey the cliffs and fields immediately facing the seafront. In the water, the anthropization visible on the land was not nearly as obvious, with the exception of a dock in the proximity of a quarrying site (Fig. 3) and, on my last day of fieldwork (as in the best archaeological tradition), we encountered a significant scatter of cultural material that may be consistent with an anchorage.
Figure 3: View from land of the quarrying site: the darker spot in the centre-right is the underwater dock (Photo by Mari Yamasaki).

Despite the relative misfortune of not being able to excavate as much as we had hoped, the survey nonetheless produced significant information. From the strictly archaeological point of view, the team was able to localize a complex system of settlements that connected the sea to the hinterland via the fluvial valleys of the Moni and Pyrgos rivers, changing through the different periods as the type of exploitation of the coastal resources changed.
A parallel objective of the survey was the appraisal of the risk represented by development and touristic exploitation of the coastal zones. In fact, both represent a heavy menace for this historically rich region. Between the eighties and the first decade of the third millennium, the coastal limestone has been massively quarried to produce cement. More recently, a new form of tourism based on massive all-inclusive resorts turned this potential ally into a menace for the local natural and archaeological heritage. Whilst the reasons behind the problem represented by industry are clear, it is harder to understand why touristic development would want to erase the potential source of income represented by archaeology. 
What we encountered during one of our days in the field is but a tiny example. During the study of the work done by earlier archaeological missions, whose area of interest happened to partly overlap with our own, we read that a previous survey from 2007 reported the presence of a Bronze Anchor embedded in one of the low stone walls at the end of the beach we were currently studying. The object was photographed and measured but at the time could not be removed due to jurisdictional conflict between the two regional districts of Limassol and Larnaca. Despite our best efforts in examining every bit of wall and all but combing the bay and the beach, we failed to re‑locate it. We asked the people working in the beach establishments only to receive a disturbing confirmation: there was indeed an object similar to the one in our photo, but no one had seen it since the construction of the new seafront restaurant. We returned to the car with strong suspicion that another piece of archaeology was lost to development, but all the more aware of that archaeology alone can only keep a record, and that the key to preserving the past is to maintain good communication between the parties involved.
Luckily things have changed greatly since 2007. Thanks to an ever growing degree of cooperation between foreign archaeological missions and the Department of Antiquities, some progress – however slow – has been made towards the integration of cultural heritage and economic development, and to prevent petty bureaucratic problems from stopping archaeological research and preservation. As far as the MPM Survey Project is concerned, a tight cooperation with the local authorities from the Limassol District resulted in the joint elaboration of protective measures for the area: the survey grounds are now under a strict surveillance for their archaeological potential, allowing for a more accurate mapping of the sites on the territory, and for prompt intervention against illegal construction and looting activities. It is our job, as archaeologists – regardless of nationality or affiliation-, to collaborate for the preservation of the unique cultural and natural heritage that lies on the beautiful island of Cyprus (Fig. 4).
 
Figure 4. Left: Wheat field in the Moni River valley. Right: Limestone cliffs at Agios Georgios Alamanos (Photos by Mari Yamasaki).

Mehr als „nur Schall und Rauch“: Vulkane aus interdisziplinärer Perspektive

Ein Beitrag von Katharina Hillenbrand.

Interdisziplinäres Arbeiten wird in der Forschung immer stärker gefordert. Kritiker bemängeln jedoch, dass dies oft eher zu oberflächlichem Halb- als zu neuem Fachwissen führe. Bei meiner Arbeit konnte ich diese Erfahrung nicht machen: Der Austausch mit Archäologen und Vulkanologen hat meine Forschung zu antiken Konzepten von Vulkanismus auch aus fachlicher Sicht sehr bereichert.
 
Ausgangspunkt war ein Bündel voll Fragen, die sich im Laufe meiner Arbeit gesammelt hatten: Zu sprachlichen Bildern und technischen Vorstellungen, die Vulkanismus in antiken Texten veranschaulichen, die ich mir aber auch nach dem Wälzen von Literatur nicht hinreichend selbst erklären konnte.

Dank einiger Gespräche mit Vertretern anderer Disziplinen konnte ich mittlerweile aber hinter manche von diesen statt des Frage- ein Ausrufungszeichen setzen. So traf ich mich am 10.02. mit Dr. Michael Herdick, dem Leiter des Kompetenzbereichs Experimentelle Archäologie, einer Außenstelle des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums in Mayen, um über Nutzung, Funktion und Aufbau römischer Öfen zu reden. Dr. Herdick hat sich vielfach experimentell mit antiken und mittelalterlichen Öfen beschäftigt und konnte mir wie kein zweiter Rede und Antwort zu meinen Fragen stehen. Dies mag auf den ersten Blick nicht unmittelbar relevant für antike Konzepte von Vulkanismus sein – tatsächlich werden vulkanische Vorgänge aber in mehreren Passagen mit Öfen verglichen. Das Wissen um die Funktionsweise dieser Technik ließ daher einige Rückschlüsse auf die vermittelten Vorstellungen von Vulkanismus zu.
 



Abb. 1 und 2: Fumarole und Schlot in der Solfatara bei Pozzuoli (Fotos: Katharina Hillenbrand).

Ähnliche Anregungen brachten auch mehrere Gespräche mit Vertretern anderer Disziplinen während meiner Reise durch die vulkanischen Gebiete Süditaliens vom 26.03. bis 15.04.2017.

 
Der Austausch mit vor Ort in den Observatorien forschenden Vulkanologen bereicherte nicht nur mein naturwissenschaftliches Wissen über Vulkane. Zu meinem eigenen Erstaunen konnte ich immer wieder frappierende Ähnlichkeiten zwischen antiken Texten und modernen Erklärungsansätzen erkennen: Nicht so sehr in den Prämissen, die durchaus unterschiedlich sind, als vielmehr in den Metaphern und Vergleichen, welche die Vorgänge veranschaulichen sollten. Sind also einige, in der Forschung oft als „merkwürdig“ betitelte antike Passagen zu Vulkanen womöglich eher das Ergebnis genauerer Observation? Auch hier konnte ich einen unmittelbaren Nutzen für fachliche Erkenntnisse erzielen.

 


 


Abb. 3 und 4: Rauchende Krater und heiße Lava am Ätna (Fotos: Katharina Hillenbrand).
 
Schließlich war auch der Austausch mit vor Ort grabenden Archäologen ein Gewinn. Diese hatten an antiken Heiligtümern geforscht, die vor allem bei hydrothermalen Erscheinungen und Matschvulkanen lagen, einem als sekundärer Vulkanismus bezeichneten Phänomen. Die archäologische Sichtweise auf die Kultstätten war eine wichtige Ergänzung; zugleich zeigten sich Parallelen zu Vorstellungen in der antiken Literatur.
 


 

Abb. 5 und 6: Matschvulkanismus, Salinelle di San Marco bei Paternò (Fotos: Katharina Hillenbrand).


Antike Konzepte von Vulkanismus, so das Fazit meiner Reisen, lassen sich durch die Beschränkung auf Mittel der Klassischen Philologie zwar erklären. Gleichwohl konnten durch die Einbeziehung anderer Disziplinen viele Überlegungen vertieft oder konkretisiert werden: Es fanden sich in den Texten Spuren anderer Wissensbereiche, die durch den interdisziplinären Austausch auf meine Fragestellung nutzbar angewendet werden konnten. Nicht zuletzt deswegen war es auch mehr als bereichernd, die in den antiken Texten erwähnten Vulkane und Gebiete einmal selbst zu „observieren“. All dies ermöglichte es zumindest ein Stück weit, antike Sichtweisen auf Vulkane besser zu verstehen.
 

Ich danke der DFG und dem Graduiertenkolleg 1876 für die Möglichkeit, die diversen Reisen zu unternehmen. Ich bedanke mich insbesondere auch bei Dr. Michael Herdick vom Kompetenzbereich Experimentelle Archäologie in Mayen, bei Dr. Giovanni Ricciardi und Dr. Tullia Uzzo vom Osservatorio Vesuviano, bei Dr. Stefanco Branca vom Osservatorio Etneo sowie bei Dr. Laura Maniscalco vom Assessorato Beni culturali e dell‘ Identitá Siciliana für ihre Hilfsbereitschaft, die vielen Anregungen und guten Gespräche.

 

York and Manchester: A report of a perfect March

A weblog entry by Shahrzad Irannejad.


The March of 2017 was the perfect month for me. I went to the charming city of York in the UK to present a paper, and met amazing scholars whose feedback on my paper was very helpful; I went to Manchester for a very fruitful research visit to the department of Prof. Peter Pormann, my mentor; I got to play a tourist in London, and the perfect month ended with a visit to my family in London to celebrate the Persian new year, Nowruz
Fig 1. Where I learned that Constantine (c. 272–337) AD was proclaimed emperor in York (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

The as-if-tailored-for-me conference „The Medieval Brain“ was a very fruitful, cozy and friendly conference with nine sessions and two key note speeches, held on the 9th, 10th, and 11th of March 2017 in The Treehouse, Humanities Research Centre, University of York. It was supported by Welcome Trust and brought together scholars in various discipline such as art history, linguistics, computational linguistics, philology, medieval studies, medical history, psychology and psychiatry. 
Fig 2. The organizer of the conference, Deborah Thorpe in the left, moderating the Q and A after the keynote speech by Corinne Saunders on the right (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
 I presented my paper ‘The Brain in Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine’ in the second panel „Grey Matters: Structuring the Brain“, alongside Prof. Salmon (University of Cantabria): ‚A complexional brain: Medical approaches to brain structure and functioning in the 13th and 14th centuries‘ and Cher Casey (University of York): ‚Making Matter of the Mind: reconstructing the medieval cranial anatomy of Cologne’s 11,000 Holy Virgin skull relics‘. I hope that the discussions following the panel would continue well into the future. You might want to take a look at afterthoughts of the organizer of the conference, Deborah Thorpe here. And I am NOT necessarily sharing this link because she has published a picture of me while presenting my paper. 
Fig 3. For one week, I would come to the Samuel Alexander building to read, write, and discuss my work with Prof. Pormann’s team (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).



Fig 4. I received a library card for a week to use the library of Manchester University, very convenient (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

I left a piece of my heart in York and moved on to Manchester for my first research stay at the department of my mentor, Prof. Peter Pormann. I had the luck to present my findings on Avicenna’s brain anatomy in a paper entitled „The Brain Ventricles and the Rete Mirabile from Galen to Avicenna“ on the last meeting of the Arabic Commentaries on the Hippocratic Aphorisms project (16 March 2017). Prof. Pormann visited us in Mainz back in May 2016 and shared with us insights about the project in a plenary meeting. On the Arabic Aphorisms days in Manchester, all team members gather together to present their works in progress, discuss and receive feedback. I also met Prof. Glen Cooper and Dr. Grigory Kessel during my stay in Manchester and received comments on my work. I used the rest of the days reading, writing and receiving guidance and comments about my work, not only from Prof. Pormann, but also from his amazing team members: Dr. Kamran Karimullah, Dr. Hammood Obaid, and Dr. Elaine van Dalen. 

Fig 5. A promising conference in December 2017: “Genealogies of Knowledge I: Translating Political and Scientific Thought across Time and Space” (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
I arrived in Manchester, as the previous project was being wrapped up, and a new project was being started: Genealogies of Knowledge: The Evolution and Contestation of Concepts across Time and Space. This project is based at the University of Manchester and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. It brings together senior scholars from Translation Studies, Graeco-Arabic Studies, Digital Media and Communication, and Computer Science. This project focuses on two constellations of concepts: 1) the historical evolution and transformation through translation of the two constellations of concepts, focusing on seminal moments of change in the reception and reproduction of translated texts and their meanings by subsequent readerships. This involves examining commentaries and (re)translations from/into Greek, early Latin, medieval Arabic and modern English; 2) the ways and means by which civil society actors involved in radical democratic groups and counter-hegemonic globalisation movements contest and redefine the meaning of such cultural concepts today, as part of an evolving radical-democratic project. This promising project involves building large, diverse electronic corpora of Greek, Latin, Arabic and English. I would be presenting a paper entitled “Translation, Transmission, Transformation: Diachronic Development of Brain Anatomy in Greco-Arabic Medicine” at the first conference of this project „Genealogies of Knowledge I: Translating Political and Scientific Thought across Time and Space“ in December 2017. 

At the end of my trip, and before joining my family, I made perfect use of my time in London and visited the Welcome Trust collection and the last house of Sigmund Freud. I am not sure if the pictures can convey a slight bit of my excitement. I share them with you, nonetheless.


Fig 6. Playing tourist in London: probably the most famous couch in the world (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
Fig 7.  Playing tourist in London: the amazing votive collection at Welcome Trust (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).
Fig 8.  Playing tourist in London: a fascinating 18thcentury anatomical model in the Welcome Trust collection (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

 
Fig 9. Playing tourist in London: my friend “accidentally” sitting right under Avicenna’s name at the Welcome Trust Library (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad). 
Fig 10. Playing tourist in London: excuses to come back (Photo by Shahrzad Irannejad).

 

Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes

A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

Between the 20th and 23rd of March, the beautiful city of Kiel (Fig. 1) served as the backdrop for the fifth international Open Workshop „Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes“ organized by the Graduate School „Human Development in Landscapes“ of Kiel University.


Figure 1: Sunset at Ratsdienergarten, Kiel (Photo by Mari Yamasaki).


The workshop hosted over two hundred papers divided into 18 sessions over 4 days, with participants coming from a variety of scientific backgrounds and from all over the globe in a truly interdisciplinary and international environment. In addition to the talks, there was a rich poster session in which the author participated with a poster titled „Coastal worlds in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age“ (Fig. 2). At any given moment, there were 6 to 9 sessions running in parallel and it is for this reason that, as much as I would have liked to, it was not possible to attend all the lectures and discussions. However, I shall at least try to provide a concise overview of the incredible work that was done during these days. 


Figure 2: The conference venue – main lecture hall, fields around the campus, posters (Photos by Mari Yamasaki).



Prof. Carole Crumley (Stockholm University) opened the workshop with thought-provoking questions: what is the contemporary role of the sciences that study the past, if there is any role left at all? What is in fact the purpose of studying the past? How can the past contribute to the current discourse in a way that it matters to the world we live in? In her engaging keynote lecture, Prof. Crumley proposed to try answering this question via a bottom-up approach, introducing the concept of Historical Ecology. The question, she said, should be formulated in terms of what we, as humans, need to save and send into the future, and of how the scientists – social and human – can inform the politics and the real world. In her words, Historical Ecology should be regarded as a „research framework for merging many kinds of evidence to reach new understanding of the human-environment relationship“.

The usefulness of the study of the past and, particularly of the archaeological landscape, was addressed several times during the conference, under different points of view. The role of the landscape as lieux de mémoire was presented by Prof. Richard Bradley, University of Reading, in his talk „Commemoration and change: remembering what may not have happened“. His talk highlighted the importance of monuments and landmarks as repositories of the collective past, whether real or – more often – imagined. The landscape was therefore presented as the privileged theatre for the display of cultural memory.

Another such example was Maria Wunderlich’s (Kiel University) comparative study of prehistoric megalithic structures in northern Europe with the ethnological observation of contemporary megalith-building tribes in south-east Asia and India. In the latter instances, these were generally erected as a public reminder of the „good deeds“ of an individual (or a family, or a clan) towards the community. She convincingly argued that the Europen prehistoric equivalents may have served a similar function.

Less theoretical and more practical were the Quantitative Analysis and Modelling in Archaeology sessions. The study of landscape was here addressed from a methodological point of view. Interesting ideas were especially presented in regards to new approaches in the understanding of the ancient settlement choices and population behaviour. Particularly interesting was the concept of fuzzification introduced by W. B. Hamer (Plans on agent based model approach on prehistoric scale, Hamer, W. B et al.). Introducing a fuzzification factor in agent-based modelling, means, for instance, to blur the lines of possibility in simulating past decision-making processes in settlement choice (e.g. when considering the factor of „steepness“ in determining whether a location is suitable for settlement, instead of drawing a clear line between suitable and non-suitable, fuzzification allows to blend this border into a grey area which, to put it simply, is far from ideal, but still acceptable). Fuzziness can be applied to a variety of situations. The pole dwellings of the Alpine lakes, for instance, are an example of terrains that would be theoretically unsuitable for permanent settlement as the muddy shores are subject to frequent seasonal inundation. However, although such locations resulted „far from ideal“, they were still „good enough“ for the prehistoric builders, probably thanks to the excellent access to the lacustrine resources.

Moving on to lakescapes and seascapes, a great wealth of field projects were presented during the relevant session, mostly focusing on the lake dwellings along the shores of Lake Constance, some on the great riverine-lacustrine systems of central Europe, with a focus on the role of the Danube as a main communication artery. My very personal and somewhat biased note concerning this – otherwise very interesting – session is that the complex seascapes of the Mediterranean area were heavily underrepresented, and it could have been interesting to compare the methodologies applied in such different geographical areas.

In conclusion, this event, with its great variety of topics and approaches, was a great source of inspiration for future work. Furthermore, it was a chance to stop and ponder over the reasons why the study of the past and the understanding of the ancient landscapes are of utmost importance for the humanity of the future.
 

And now for something completely different… Social Media and Internet Presence

A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki and Laura Borghetti.

Heidelberg, February 27th, 8:30 AM. An Egyptologist, a Classical Philologist, a Byzantine Philologist and a Near Eastern Archaeologist walk into a room of female mathematicians. This is not the beginning of a joke, but of the two-day workshop in this ancient university town. In the elegant conference room of ArtHotel, a few puzzled gazes fly towards us, the only four girls from the Humanities. „So… what brought you here?“ we are repeatedly asked. Considering that we are at the Third Networking and Mentoring Workshop for Women in Mathematics, the four of us agree it is a legitimate question. What brought us here, we always reply, is the theme of this workshop: Social Media and Internet Presence.

Fig. 1: From left: Mari Yamasaki, Laura Borghetti, Simone Gerhards, Gabriela Meyer and Katharina Hillenbrand (Photo by Maria Ruprecht).


To understand our answer, here’s a little background. When our GRK started, it was agreed that the best way of engaging with the general public would be through a weblog – the very same you are reading right now. After a few years, we came to realize that in order to reach more people, this could use some improvement and maybe could be supported by another social media platform. After some discussion and considering how most of us are to some extent familiar with it, we decided that an official Facebook page could fill this „supporting role“. However, far from being experts, we looked forward to this workshop to find inspiration as to how we should pursue our goal.

The two key-roles of this initiative have been played by Maria Rupprecht, Executive Networking Coordinator at the Ruprecht-Karls Universität in Heidelberg within „Upstream – the Network for Women in Maths“ and Gabriela Meyer, expert in communication, publicist and trainer in public relations. Thanks to their professionalism and friendliness, and during an intense but exciting two-days program, it was made possible to break the general suspicion against social networks and animate a lively brainstorming about this new form of media. Concepts of different kind of social medias, from the rather job search-oriented Xing to the more popular Twitter, from the online business card about.me to the web-storytelling in travel-blogs: all were taken as practical examples during the workshop. Even more interesting was the rather interactive side of our meeting, when we participants were asked to create new accounts or to improve our own existing ones. 

Making use of the opportunity of having an expert at hand, we volunteered to present our weblog as a case study of the use of social media to support scientific engagement with the wider public. Ms. Meyer showed us the strong points of our page and (most importantly) the weak ones. While not touching the merit of the scientific and educational content, she gave us advice on how we could modify its layout to make it more appealing for the casual and the expert reader alike. We were able to collect much input and many good ideas that will need a little bit of time to be implemented, but changes are coming, so keep following us! One novelty is already out there: check out our new Facebook page

Fig. 2: Katharina Hillenbrand and Simone Gerhards showing our Weblog to Gabriela Meyer (Photo by Maria Ruprecht).


As we saw during these two days, the poor reputation for Social Media often comes from a misuse of their potential. For instance, the flood of breakfast photos on Instagram or of cat jokes on Facebook devalues these platforms. Much worse, social media are sadly the fastest way to spread false and unverified news. For these reasons, it is even more important to implement the use of this technology to disseminate scientific knowledge in an attractive and accessible way. The decision to adopt a popular platform such as Facebook in parallel with our official weblog serves exactly this purpose. Not only to give fast and concise updates on the research that our Graduiertenkolleg is working on, but also to promptly inform our readers about cultural initiatives the doctoral students take part in, and why not, to get to know us. For research is not an abstract entity detached from the world, but it is made of people, of colleagues and friends, even if virtual.

The Oxford Byzantine Society’s 19th International Graduate Conference: Circulation and Transmission of Ideas between Past and Present

A weblog entry by Laura Borghetti.

When it comes to cultural vivacity and exchange of knowledge, very few places are as inspiring as Oxford, UK. Colleges and faculties, enclosed in solemn and slender gothic buildings, shape the almost magical profile of the old city (fig. 1). Visitors, especially scholars, get the feeling of walking along a huge, lively university campus that romantically tastes like the Middle Ages. In such atmosphere, from February the 24th till 25th 2017, took place The Oxford University Byzantine Society’s 19th International Graduate Conference, with a title that perfectly matches Oxford’s vivacious academic environment: „Transmitting and Circulating the Late Antiquity and Byzantine Worlds“.

Fig. 1: Some views of Oxford (from the left): Inner courtyard in Exeter College, the main door of the History Faculty with the Conference’s poster, the Dome of the Radcliffe Camera. (Photos by Laura Borghetti)


Given the vastness of the late Roman and Byzantine Empires in terms of both territorial extent and cultural variety, the circulation and transmission of ideas, people, texts and objects played a decisive role in creating a political, economic and religious network which – in turn – ensured the unity of both empires for more than ten centuries. Closely mirroring the byzantine millennium, the program of the conference was extremely various and fascinating: more than fifty papers, concerning byzantine philology, history, art and archaeology – divided in two simultaneous sessions – allowed the participants shape a quite comprehensive portrait of the modalities, frequency and different means of cultural transmission in Byzantium.

The lively brainstorming after each speaker’s presentation was enough evidence for how effective this conference was in stimulating the exchange of knowledge and the circulation of new ideas. Especially, given the participation of only graduate students, the brainstorming related to still in-progress projects could inspire, in both the speakers and the rest of participants, new points of view, perspectives and approaches that might be useful to each individual research.


The chance to take a small part in the organization of such an event has for me been both an honour and a pleasure: following Mirela Ivanova’s friendly but firm directions (Mirela is an Oxford PhD student and the president of the Oxford University Byzantine Society during this academic year), the Oxford graduates‘ crew took care of organising participants‘ invitations and accommodation and arranging delicious coffee breaks, meals and evening wine receptions. I personally could enjoy some unskilled labour such as cutting paper badges or preparing coffee for the guests. As an Italian assiduous coffee-drinker, I took this last task pretty much seriously (fig. 2). 

Fig. 2: Mirela Ivanova and Laura Borghetti in the common room of the History Faculty. (Photo by Laura Borghetti)

The most challenging side in the whole organising process was surely gathering the speakers from all over the world. From Great Britain to Turkey, from Italy to Japan, this conference has shown how the circulation and the transmission of ideas and people in Byzantium many centuries ago still manages, nowadays, to instigate the transmission of old ideas and new, and circulation of people and their gathering to exchange ideas.


Environment, Landscape and Society; Diachronic perspectives on settlement patterns in Cyprus

A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

For nearly four decades, the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI) has been central to the archaeology of the island. It functions as the aggregating point for the many international scholars conducting fieldwork and study seasons in Cyprus, often hosting lectures in which the most recent results can be promptly presented to an audience of peers. In the course of its life, CAARI has always maintained continuous and profitable cooperation with the Cypriot Department of Antiquities and, since its foundation in 2005, with The Cyprus Institute; cooperation that once again was key to the success of the conference held between the 17th and the 19th of February 2017, titled „Environment, Landscape and Society. Diachronic perspectives on settlement patterns in Cyprus“ (fig. 1).

Figure 1: „Conference logo: Vermeule, E. & Karageorgis, V., 1982. Mycenaean pictorial vase painting, Cambridge, MA. (p.46, ill. V.39) – Amphoroid krater from Enkomi (LHIIIB)“


In line with its tradition, on this occasion, speakers from all over the globe convened in Nicosia to discuss theories, methods and future perspectives of Landscape Studies. This event was made possible thanks to the tireless work of CAARI Director Andrew McCarthy (fig. 2) and his staff, and a generous financial contribution by the US Embassy in Cyprus.


Figure 2: Director of CAARI Andrew McCarthy, PhD with the author. (Photo by Katerina Mavromichalou)


The motivation for organizing such a conference was to bring together scholars with different scientific backgrounds, working on a diversity of projects in Cyprus and the Aegean, to tackle the universal question: what is the impetus of settlement? In other words: can we identify a set of environmental/cultural/economic conditions that need to be fulfilled to have a settlement? And are these universal or specific to each case?

Twenty-seven papers were presented in six chronologically ordered sessions. Case studies spanned from the Aceramic Neolithic to the Late Byzantine Period. Environment, landscape and the changes in society were tackled from a variety of perspectives, either investigating what role the first had in shaping the latter, or the importance of Big Data Analysis in studying how people moved across their landscape and why. Another important aspect that emerged from these talks, is how archaeobotanical and isotopic analysis as well as geomorphology can help in reconstructing ancient landscapes.

Professor James C. Wright, Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, opened the event with the keynote lecture „The Longue Durée: the piedmont of the Corinthia and cycles of regional occupation“. He introduced the controversial role that has been attributed to the environment in influencing human choices, with positions bordering environmental determinism on one side, and extreme relativism on the other.

The weight of environmental conditions in the choice of settlement is particularly evident in the study of pre- and protohistoric cultures. In most instances, as one would expect, the favourable location allowing easy access to a different set of resources appeared to be the decisive factor in the choice of settlement. However, in other cases the choice for a particular place was seemingly unrelated to its economic exploitability and the reasons need to be looked for in terms of symbolic value, tradition and social memory.

Mechanisms of occupation, movement, aggregation and abandonment were matters of lively discussion, with special focus on the effects of climate change. It was pointed out that in regards to Cyprus, information on ancient climate changes still relies on Near Eastern proxies and the impact of the climatic events recorded, for example, in the Tell Leilan cores need to be carefully evaluated. What was clear from each one of the presented case studies was that the sheer number of variables that intervene into settlement occupation/abandonment are such that it would be overly simplistic to attribute societal change solely to environmental factors – however big they may be – or to underestimate the role that climatic events – however small – may have on community life in the short term.

To gain a better picture of environment, landscape and society, it is therefore necessary to have a holistic approach that takes into consideration evidences of human activities, faunal and botanical remains, geomorphological, climatic factors, settlement patterns and much more. To deal with this huge variety of information, Big Data and information technologies have grown in importance over the last decade to go „beyond the dots“, as Francesca Chelazzi (PhD, University of Glasgow) eloquently showed in her paper. The use of geographic information systems (GIS) is more and more being implemented to investigate the spatial and diachronic development of the landscape, to pose new questions on the relations underlying the patterns of distribution of cultural material and settlements alike. Studies on regionalism in the pottery production during the Chalcolithic, as illustrated by Harry Paraskeva (PhD, University of Cyprus), or the function of sanctuaries as boundaries between for the Iron Age City Kingdoms were just two examples of the potential of GIS combined with more traditional ceramics study. GIS has proven to be a key to interpret data from surveys such as the ASESP Project concerning the relations of settlement and defensive structures along the Yialias River, presented by Despina Pilides (Curator of Antiquities, of the Department of Antiquities) and Eiliš Monahan (PhD Candidate, Cornell University), or Professor Oliva Menozzi’s (Universitá G. D’Annunzio, Chieti – fig. 3) presentation and posters of a large-scale survey in the Moni catchment area, within the MPM Project. Both these archaeological projects would deserve to be treated in detail in merit of their ground-breaking research and, also as an active member of both missions, it is the author’s hope to dedicate a full article to them in the near future. 

Figure 3: Professor Oliva Menozzi (Universitá G. D’Annunzio, Chieti) with the author, posing in front of the poster by V. Carniel, S. Caggiano, G. Di Camillo, O. Menozzi, M. Yamasaki, L. Mariangeli, „Underwater surveys: archaeological and geomorphological results“. (Photo by Katerina Marvomichalou)


Isotopic analysis can provide some insight concerning the ancient diet and consequently, on the ecosystem that surrounded these ancient populations when integrated with palaeobotanical and palaeoenvironmental studies. This approach was presented with a case study from the MBA site of Erimi Laonin tou Porakou, excavated by the Kouris Valley Project, where the study of stable isotopes and the spatial analysis of the Kourin River catchment provided a plausible reconstruction of the ancient landscape. The paper was co-authored by C. Sciré-Calabrisotto (fig. 4) (Stable Isotope Analysis, Universitá Ca‘ Foscari di Venezia), E. Margaritis (Archaeobotanic remains, The Cyprus Institute), M. Yamasaki (Spacial analysis, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, whose participation to this conference was made possible by the generous travel grant by GRK1876 „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“) , and L. Bombardieri (Project Director, Universitá degli Studi di Torino).


Figure 4: Caterina Sciré-Calabrisotto (Universitá Ca‘ Foscari di Venezia) presenting the paper co-authored by C. Scirè Calabrisotto, E. Margaritis, M. Yamasaki and L. Bombardieri, „Drifting down the big still river. Erimi Laonin tou Porakou in its ecological context during the Middle Bronze Age“. (Photo by Katerina Mavromichalou)


A variety of scientifically sound approaches was presented concerning the motives and mechanisms of settlement, but one must not forget the cultural element in defining the landscape. As Professor Thierry Petit (Université Laval) said in his talk „From Royal Palace to Forlorn Kastro“: when does space become place? Social memory and the construction of shared identities, the creation of points of aggregation by human communities charge previously empty areas with meaning and turn geographic spaces into symbolic places.

At the end of these fascinating three days, the conference’s conclusive paper was delivered by Prof. Michael Given of the University of Glasgow. The landscape really is an infinite web of interactions, but we have made such a habit of reducing and standardizing them that our perception of diversity ends up eventually flattened. The roman deforestation of the Troodos foothills for copper extraction and the modern sand mines that hacked into the Yialias aquifer and its water table are just some examples of the dramatic consequences of this flattened perception. Today more than ever, in a moment of runaway climate change, archaeology – from its privileged four dimensional viewpoints – should engage with the landscape and its interactions and not reduce it to mere points on a map. It should be approached in terms of nodes of interaction, routes and mobility across it, the composition of its surfaces and volume and, finally, through its tremendous variations across time.

The nodes of interactions are intended as those areas that show a richness and diversity of life, soils, activities, morphology, etc. The way people and animals move across a territory and the possibility of taking a route instead of another are fundamental elements to understand how the landscape is shaped and inhabited. As for the composition of surfaces, this aspect concerns the way soils are formed through all the activities of geological, botanical, faunal and human life, from worms to ploughing. For example, it is at this level of interaction that we find pottery sherds and material culture remains. Volumes comprise every transformation in the three dimensions, not only in the depths of the ground (where the accumulation of surfaces originates a stratigraphic sequence, which is a volume of typical archaeological interest), but also in the air, with its sounds, smells, and  more recently  pollution. The many changes of a landscape through time are also essential parts of it, as past interactions inevitably have repercussions in the future ones. An example is the case study presented by Prof. Kassianidou (University of Cyprus): the effects of the massive deforestation of the Solea Valley for the Roman copper industry were still visible on the territory until the early 20th Century, when they were in turn obliterated by the modern copper mines. Nevertheless, time variations include smaller, seasonal changes, which are equally important to understand the reasons behind the occupation of a given area. 

Even though this is not the place to explore in detail all the implications of these five components, at least a few words need to be spent on the last element, as there can be no better example for Prof. Given’s four-dimensionality of landscape than Cyprus itself. Upon arrival on a chilly February afternoon, it was impossible to ignore how strikingly different the island appeared compared to how most foreign archaeologists (myself included) are used to know it for. In fact, since most excavations take place from May to October, in the archaeologist’s (and in the tourist’s) imagination, Cyprus is a dusty, dry and scorching hot expanse in the Eastern Mediterranean. However, the lush, bright green fields, with their spots of yellow and white wild flowers proved just how diverse a single, ought-to-be-familiar landscape can be, even within a few months difference (fig. 5, 6). 


Figure 5: View of Barsak from Ayios Sozomenos Ambelia in Semptember 2016. (Photo by Mari Yamasaki)

Figure 6:  View of the Ayios Sozomenos area from Barsak in February 2017. (Photo by Mari Yamasaki)

8. Workshop der AG Computer-Anwendungen und Quantitative Methoden in der Archäologie (CAA) in Heidelberg, 10.-11.02.2017

Ein Beitrag von Sonja Speck.
 
Ein wichtiger Teil meines Dissertationsvorhabens über Körperkonzepte in ägyptischer prä- und frühdynastischer anthropomorpher Plastik ist die Untersuchung der Entwicklung von Körperproportionen anhand von 3D-Modellen der entsprechenden anthropomorphen Figuren. Gemeinsam mit Kollegen habe ich ein modulares, automatisiertes System für die 3D-Dokumentation archäologischer Objekte entwickelt. Dieses System ist sehr flexibel und wurde durch kleinere Anpassungen für die Aufnahme prä- und frühdynastischer anthropomorpher Plastik nutzbar gemacht. Im Rahmen des 8. Workshops der AG Computer-Anwendungen und Quantitative Methoden in der Archäologie (CAA) vom 10.-11.02.2017 hatte ich die Gelegenheit, dieses System in einem Poster („Ein modulares, automatisiertes System für die 3D-Dokumentation ägyptischer prä- und frühdynastischer anthropomorpher Plastik“ von Sonja Speck, Christian Seitz, Benjamin Reh mit einem Beitrag von Anna-Lena Heusser) dem Fachpublikum zu präsentieren.

Die AG CAA ist ein international aufgestellter Verein, der den wissenschaftlichen Austausch im Überschneidungsfeld von Informatik und Archäologie fördert. Der Heidelberger Workshop ist Teil der jährlichen Treffen des deutschen CAA-Ablegers. Ziel des Workshops ist es, Forscher und Nachwuchsforscher aus Archäologie und Informatik zusammen zu bringen und vor allem aktuelle Projekte zu präsentieren. Einige der vorgestellten Projekte werden auch privat und ohne finanzielle Unterstützung durchgeführt, wenn der Bedarf groß und entsprechendes Know-How vorhanden ist. Bestes Beispiel dafür ist das von Clemens Schmidt und Dirk Seidensticker im Vortrag „neolithicRC: Eine Suchmaschine für Radiokohlenstoffdatierungen“ vorgestellte Projekt, das als bestes Paper ausgezeichnet wurde.
 

Keynote-Vortrag: „Stunde Null und Cultural Heritage Data“

Den Keynote-Vortrag hielt Reinhard Förtsch vom Deutschen Archäologischen Institut über „Stunde Null und Cultural Heritage Data“. Das Projekt „Stunde Null – Eine Zukunft für die Zeit nach der Krise“ ist ein gemeinsames Vorhaben des DAI und seiner Partner im „Archaeological Heritage Network“ (ArcHerNet), der Abteilung für Kultur und Kommunikation des Auswärtigen Amts sowie der Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ).
 
Ziel ist es, das im aktuellen Konflikt gefährdete und zum Teil schon zerstörte kulturelle Erbe in Syrien und im Irak für die Zukunft zu schützen und wiederherzustellen. Neben Ausbildung von Restauratoren, Bauforschern usw. und der Suche nach Strategien des Wiederaufbaus ist Forschung und Datensammlung der dritte Stützpfeiler des Projekts und Grundlage für jegliche Bemühungen des Wiederaufbaus.
 
Förtsch betonte, dass die „Stunde Null“ bewusst einen anderen Weg gehen möchte als viele andere Cultural Heritage Data-Projekte. Laut Förtsch gibt es auch eine dunkle Seite der Cultural Heritage Data, die sich in vielen Projekten in kolonialistischen Perspektiven zeigt. Meist geht die Planung und Strukturierung dieser Projekte von westlichen Ländern aus, anschließend werden die erhobenen Daten den Herkunftsländern entzogen und den Menschen nicht zugänglich gemacht. Häufige Rechtfertigungen für dieses Vorgehen lauten, dass das Management der Daten technisch zu schwierig sei, um in den Herkunftsländern durchgeführt zu werden. Förtsch nennt das „Datenkolonialismus“. Daher nimmt „Stunde Null“ den Weg der kontinuierlichen Zusammenarbeit und Capacity Building vor Ort. Einerseits sollen diese technischen Kapazitäten durch Ausbildung und Lieferung von Hard- und Software geschaffen werden. Andererseits sollen gemeinsam spezielle und vielleicht auch einfache Lösungen entwickelt werden, die den Betrieb vor Ort ermöglichen.
 
Ein bitterer Unterton begleitete den Vortrag angesichts der großen Aufgabe, an einer Zukunft für das kulturelle Erbe Syriens und des Iraks mitzubauen, der Herausforderungen und Schwierigkeiten, die im Bereich Cultural Heritage Data schon bestanden, und der zerstörerischen Brutalität des Krieges, die Menschen und ihr kulturelles Erbe gleichermaßen zu vernichten droht. Die von Förtsch angesprochenen Probleme von Cultural Heritage Data sind nicht isoliert, sondern in die allgemeinen Probleme des Umgangs mit Daten eingebunden. Denn zurzeit sind die Möglichkeiten beim Daten-Sammeln groß, wie mit den Daten aber verfahren werden soll, ist nach wie vor ein stark umkämpftes Thema.
 

Panels und Postersession

Die beiden Panels des ersten Tages befassten sich mit Projekten im Bereich Netzwerk- und Raumanalyse. Am Abend folgte die Postersession mit 19 Postern, die jeweils durch einen einminütigen Teaser im Plenum angekündigt wurden. Der zweite Tag begann mit dem Panel zu Open Data, Datenbanken und Suchmaschinen. Den Abschluss bildete eine diverse Session mit Themen im Bereich digitale Strategien für archäologische sowie konservatorische Fragestellungen und Herausforderungen, maschinelles Lernen in der Archäologie und Dokumentationsstandards.
 
Wenn dieser Workshop eines gezeigt hat, dann, dass Computeranwendungen in der Archäologie schon lange kein Nischenphänomen mehr sind. Das interessierte Publikum musste zum Teil auf einen zweiten Hörsaal mit Video- und Live-Übertragung von Diskussionsfragen ausweichen, um die Vorträge über kleine und größere, private oder mit öffentlichen Mitteln und Drittmitteln finanzierte, aber immer innovative Projekte zu hören. Zusätzlich zu den Vorträgen muss auch die relativ große Postersession genannt werden, die die Zahl der Beiträge nochmals mehr als verdoppelte.

Closed Meeting of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature”

A weblog entry by Laura Borghetti.

January the 30th and 31st, Retzbach am Main: surely there is no better way for the GRK’s crew (Fig. 1) than to begin the new year with a Klausurtagung (Closed Meeting). If one should choose three words to define this two-days meeting, they would be: solid team spirit, intense brainstorming and cosy but – at the same time – extremely functional location. 
 
Figure 1: GRK’s Klausurtagung Team (Photo: Laura Borghetti).
But, first, I would like to explain more precisely what a Klausurtagung is in the framework of a Research Training Group in a German University, such as – in our case – the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz: Thanks to the funding made available by the German Research Foundation (DFG – Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), the PhD students of the Graduiertenkolleg 1876 – Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur had the chance to spend two days in a different location, in order to discuss several internal issues and forthcoming events related to the GRK. No professors or guest scholars were to take part in this meeting and the students could freely plan, debate and better get to know each other. In fact, it was the first Klausurtagung since October 2016 when the new generation of PhD students had begun their three-years research period. Being able to create a harmonious and collaborative working environment is crucial in a research group, whose success is tightly bound to an effective interdisciplinary exchange among PhD students. 
 
Thanks to this solid team spirit, we did much fruitful brainstorming: eventual innovations for the GRK’s weblog; a default layout for the posters that will represent the research projects of the GRK members – especially in view of the application for an extension of the GRK’s funding by the DFG; a future excursion related to some of the PhD students‘ research topics. More in detail, the necessity of a different approach in the weblog management had been felt by all participants: not only should the blog report the various academic experiences of the members of the GRK, but it should also properly share and enhance the students‘ enthusiasm in their activities, and promote academic initiative and events beforehand, maybe even through a concurrent use of social networks. These are only few of the topics and ideas the students discussed in Retzbach. In fact, especially the „new entries“ had the possibility to exchange their first impressions, ask questions, clarify doubts, and receive suggestions and opinions about the research activity by the „elder“ students. 
 
Figure 2: Plaque on the door of our meeting room (Photo: Laura Borghetti).
The whole meeting could not find a better location than the Benedictushöhe in Retzbach am Main (Fig. 2). This complex, refashioned especially for conferences and meetings, makes available to its guests anything they need: wide and bright conference rooms with a lovely view on the quiet flow of the river Main, which are equipped with several essential tools, such as projectors, cupboards, roomy desks and comfortable chairs (Fig. 3). Different kinds of beverages are at the guests‘ disposal, who are thereby offered a chance to cool down and stay fit during the long working hours. 


Figure 3: Our meeting room (Photo: Laura Borghetti).
In conclusion, I would like to highlight one more time the importance of this group activity in the framework of the GRK. Exchange of views, collaboration, mutual trust and empathy are essential in making a working environment pleasant and productive. In short, this Klausurtagung has, in my opinion, been one of the key elements in the development of the GRK’s team spirit.

Vortrag von Ainsley Hawthorn – The Shifting Gaze: Vision in the Neo-Assyrian Royal Inscriptions

Ein Beitrag von Nadine Gräßler.

Wie haben die Menschen des alten Orients das Sehen verstanden? Und wie wurde es in textlichen und bildlichen Hinterlassenschaften verarbeitet? Diese und weitere Fragen beantwortete Dr. Ainsley Hawthorn, Alumna der Universität Yale, am 2. Februar 2017 in einem Gastvortrag zu den Konzepten des Sehens im alten Orient.[1] Sie ergänzte damit ein Thema, das im GRK durch das im letzten Jahr abgeschlossene Dissertationsprojekt von Nadine Gräßler zu Konzepten des Auges für das alte Ägypten bearbeitet wurde, wodurch sich eine interdisziplinäre Sichtweise ermöglichte.
 
Detail der Statue des Ebih-Il, ca. 2400 v. Chr. (Louvre, AO 17551). Quelle: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ebih-Il_Louvre_AO17551_n11.jpg; (c) Marie-Lan Nguyen.
 

„Sensory Studies“ in den Altertumswissenschaften

Zu Beginn ihres Vortrags machte Ainsley Hawthorn auf den „Sensory Turn“ aufmerksam, der seit einiger Zeit in den Kulturwissenschaften Thema ist.[2] Die „Sensory Studies“ beinhalten neben der kulturwissenschaftlichen Untersuchung der Sinne und der Wahrnehmung auch die Analyse der Möglichkeiten wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnis durch sinnliche Wahrnehmung. Auch in den Altertumswissenschaften sind Studien zu den Sinnen, der sinnlichen Wahrnehmung und im Zuge dessen auch der Beschreibung von Emotionen derzeit aktuell: Wie verstehen Menschen ihre Wahrnehmung und wie unterscheidet sich dieses Verständnis in der jeweiligen Kultur oder geschichtlichen Epoche? Für viele der in den Altertumswissenschaften verorteten Kulturen muss bei der Untersuchung der Sinne beachtet werden, dass wir heute nur einseitigen Zugang dazu haben. Das heißt, wir können nur aus schriftlichen und bildlichen Hinterlassenschaften schöpfen und dadurch zum Beispiel Konzepte des Sehens im alten Orient oder Ägypten rekonstruieren; wir werden jedoch nie ein komplettes Bild dieser Konzepte bekommen, da diese Hinterlassenschaften zufällig sind und nicht die komplette Kultur abbilden.
 

„Aktives“ und „passives“ Sehen

Im Fokus von Ainsley Hawthorns Vortrag standen die Verben des Sehens in den neuassyrischen Königsinschriften. Zunächst stellte Dr. Hawthorn die akkadischen Verben des Sehens vor. Hier stellte sich heraus, dass im alten Orient zwischen „nach innen“ und „nach außen“ gerichtetem bzw. passivem und aktivem Sehen unterschieden wurde. Dieses aktive Sehen wird durch das Verb naplusu(m) ausgedrückt. Ähnlich finden wir dies heute auch im Englischen, das „gaze“ („Starren“), den aktiven Blick, von „sight“ („Sehen“), dem passiven Blick, trennt. Im Gegensatz zu heute besaßen aber den aktiven Blick in Mesopotamien nur die Götter, wodurch sie sich ganz klar von den Menschen unterschieden, für die in den textlichen Hinterlassenschaften eher der „nach innen“ gerichtete Blick belegt ist. Die übermenschliche Qualität der Götter wird somit hervorgehoben.
Auch in den neuassyrischen Königsinschriften stand der Blick der Götter im Vordergrund. Er wurde in den Inschriften stilvoll als Propagandamittel eingesetzt, um das Wohlwollen der Götter für den jeweiligen König auszudrücken.
Ein abschließender Vergleich mit den Sehverben in Briefen zeigte, dass sich das Vokabular zum Sehen von dem in den neuassyrischen Königsinschriften unterscheidet, da eine andere prozentuale Verteilung der Verben bezeugt ist. Je nach Textsorte und Kontext wurden also verschiedene Verben des Sehens eingesetzt.
 

Universalität vs. Spezifität und die Frage nach den „Sinnen“

Interessanterweise konnte Nadine Gräßler in ihrer Dissertation ganz ähnliche Vorstellungen eines aktiven und passiven Sehens für das alte Ägypten erarbeiten, das jedoch innerkulturell anders verarbeitet wurde.[3] Es scheint sich um eine unabhängig voneinander entstandene Vorstellung zu handeln, die auch noch in anderen antiken Kulturen zu finden ist (zum Beispiel im antiken Griechenland), von Kultur zu Kultur jedoch spezifische Ausprägungen beinhaltet.

Ein weiterer Punkt, den Ainsley Hawthorn ansprach und der auch in der Diskussion eine Rolle spielte, war die Frage nach der Klassifikation der Sinne. Heute fassen wir unsere fünf Wahrnehmungsorgane unter dem Oberbegriff „Sinne“ oder „Sinnesorgane“ zusammen. Zu diesen zählen wir die Augen (zum Sehen), die Ohren (zum Hören), die Nase (zum Riechen), den Mund (zum Schmecken) und die Haut (zum Fühlen). Diese Einteilung muss in vormodernen Kulturen jedoch nicht zwangsläufig der Fall gewesen sein. Im alten Orient existierte der Begriff „Sinne“ bzw. „Sinnesorgane“ zum Beispiel überhaupt nicht. Dies gilt auch für das alte Ägypten. (Sinnes-)Wahrnehmung wurde also in beiden Fällen unterschiedlich zu heute definiert. Diese Unterschiede aufzuarbeiten und aufzudecken unterstreicht die Wichtigkeit der „Sensory Studies“ in den Altertumswissenschaften.

 
Fußnoten:
[1] Das Thema stellte eine Erweiterung ihrer 2012 abgeschlossenen Dissertation „Catching the Eye of the Gods: The Gaze in Mesopotamian Literature“ dar.
[2] Für Interessierte eignet sich als Einstieg gut der Artikel von David Howes, „The Expanding Field of Sensory Studies“,
http://www.sensorystudies.org/sensorial-investigations/the-expanding-field-of-sensory-studies/.
[3] Dissertationsprojekt von Nadine Gräßler: Konzepte des Auges im alten Ägypten.
 

Animals in Byzantium: Three case studies. A lecture by Prof. Stavos Lazaris

A weblog entry by Shahrzad Irannejad. 
On the 26th of January, 2017, within the Lecture Series „Kult, Kunst und Konsum – Tiere in alten Kulturen„, Prof. Stavos Lazaris, research fellow at CNRS (Le Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), Paris, presented his lecture on the views regarding animals in Byzantium. He chose to share with us such views using three case studies: exploited animals, tamed animals and studied animals. He began by a general review of the state of research in the matter, and how, despite much interest, an all-encompassing picture of the relationship between man and animals, both domestic and wild, in the Byzantium is yet to be painted. He, therefore, presented three concrete aspects of this relationship. 

Exploited Animals

After general remarks on domestication of animals by man, and explaining how man has historically chosen those species willing to collaborate in labour and transportation, Prof. Lazaris presented us with various examples of Byzantine pharmacological preparations containing animal products or parts. For instance, how milk, honey, and lamb liver is meant to cure epilepsy. With only few exceptions (like such exotic ingredients as lion liver), most of the animal products and parts mentioned in Byzantine pharmacological texts belong to domesticated animals. Comparing such recipes to their counterparts in Pliny (23-79 AD) or Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179 AD), Prof. Lazaris explained, the Byzantines had a pragmatic and realistic approach to the use of animals in medications.

Tamed Animals

Drawing on textual evidence and iconographic data, Prof. Lazaris presented us with the Byzantines’ approach to taming of animals and their relations to their tamed animals. He presented data from Timothy of Gaza’s (active during the reign of Anastasius I, 491-518) book on animals. Furthermore, he introduced the autobiographical poem of Paulinus of Pella (377 – after 461), in which there is mention of the desire to own a good horse, a swift hound, and a hawk. Furthermore, the mosaics from the Villa of the Falconer in Argos (Fig. 1), alongside textual evidence show that falconry was practiced since early Byzantine period. Last but not least, drawing on the chronicles of Constantine Manasses (fl. 12th century), he demonstrated that there were emotional ties between raptors and the hunters using them.
Figure 1: ÅKERSTRÖM-HOUGEN, G. (1974), The calendar and hunting mosaics of the villa of the falconer in Argos: a study in early Byzantine iconography, Stockholm (Skrifter utgivna av Svenska Institutet i Athen. Series prima in 4° 23).
 

Studied Animals

Prof. Lazaris demonstrated, based on several texts he discussed, that animals were also studied under the Byzantines. These texts mostly dealt with training of raptors, caring for them and their food: for instance, Demetrius Pepagomenus’s (fl. 13th century) text devoted to dogs. He also gave an example from a text by an anonymous writer that prescribed cooked bat for epileptic falcons. Lastly, he reviewed visual samples from hippiatic illustrated manuscripts. Prof. Lazaris believed that the illustrations in these manuscripts acted as some sort of visual checklists: they would facilitate memorization and could also act as guides for navigation of the reader throughout the text.
Prof. Lazaris also presented some early Christian debates regarding the status of animals. Such debates circled around these questions: Did Jesus Christ descend to earth also to redeem animals? Are animals, thus, also resurrected? Should they be treated as moral beings? Prof. Lazaris introduced the Physiologus (author unknown, 2nd century AD), as one of the first zoological Christian texts. He noted, however, that this text is rather meant to discuss the evils of the realm of the soul. Each chapter in this text comprises of two parts: first a summary of ethological data; then a symbolic and allegorical reading of the data in the first section, containing moral and religious messages.
To round up the lecture, Prof. Lazaris mentioned that it is currently becoming fashionable in the realm of research in man-animal relationships, to shift the research away from the perspective of man. He noted, however, that the texts one deals with in medieval times are very much anthropocentric and it is thus very difficult to reconstruct the perspective of the animal.

 

The lecture was followed by questions and comments from the audience, moderated by our colleague Tristan Schmidt.

Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Sabine Obermaier – Du bist das Tier, das du isst. Zur Symbolik von Speisetieren in der höfischen Epik des Mittelalters

Ein Beitrag von Oxana Polozhentseva. 

Die Ringvorlesung „Kult, Kunst und Konsum – Tiere in alten Kulturen“, die im Wintersemester 2016/17 vom GRK 1876 organisiert wurde, erfasste die ganze Palette der in unserem Graduiertenkolleg repräsentierten Fachgebiete. Am 12. Januar 2017 trug Prof. Dr. Sabine Obermaier (Mainz, Germanistische Mediävistik) mit ihrem Vortrag zur Symbolik von Speisetieren in der Literatur des Mittelalters dazu bei.


Die Präsentation, die von der Referentin zweiteilig strukturiert wurde, umfasste sowohl konkrete Beispiele von Speiseszenen aus der mittelalterlichen Literatur und mögliche Vorgehensweisen bei ihrer Deutung (1. Teil) als auch theoretisch-methodische Reflexionen zum radikalen Umdenken der kategorialen Differenz zwischen Tier und Mensch in den modernen animal studies, die sich in der Tierforschung zur Zeit großer Beliebtheit erfreuen (2. Teil).

Du bist das Tier, das du isst./!/?

Schlichte bäuerliche Mahlzeit oder königliches Festmahl, demütigender Verzicht auf Essen im Sinne der Buße oder unkontrollierbare Maßlosigkeit bei der Esseneinnahme – in der Breite gehören Speiseszenen zum unabdingbaren Bestandteil der höfischen Epik des Mittelalters (vgl. Abb. 1). Dominierend ist in der mediävistischen Forschung die Enthüllung der sozialen und politischen Dimensionen solcher Episoden. In diesem Kontext sind die Speisetiere als Indikatoren für die Qualität, insbesondere die Exklusivität des Mahls, oder den Stand des Gastgebers und auch der Gäste bedeutend und dementsprechend sozial markiert. So weist der junge Helmbrecht, der seiner Abstammung nach ein Bauernsohn ist, aber ein Leben als (Raub-)Ritter wählt, seinem Vater wazzer, gîselitze und haber (Wasser, Getreidebrei und Haferbrot) zu, sich selbst angemessen findet er aber wîn, huon versoten und wîzen semeln (Wein, gesottenes Huhn und Weißbrot). [1] Auf diese Weise entsteht ein Antagonismus zwischen „Herrenspeise“ und „Bauernspeise“, der verschiedenen Zwecken in der Handlung dienen kann. Interessant ist aber auch, ob die Speisetiere in solchen Szenen eine zusätzliche symbolische Dimension erhalten, denn die Tiere selbst bilden oft einen Subtext von interpretativer Relevanz.


Abb. 1: Vier Ritter werden durch (vermutlich) den Dichter Steinmar mit Federvieh und einer Kanne Wein bewirtet. Tafel 102 aus dem Codex Manesse (ca. 1300 bis 1340). [2] 



Im Lichte dieser Hypothese ist es sinnvoll, ein von Prof. Dr. Obermaier angeführtes Beispiel genauer zu betrachten. Es stammt aus Wolframs von Eschenbach „Parzival“ (1210), und zwar aus der sog. Eltern-Vorgeschichte (Gahmuret/Belakane): Gahmuret, Parzivals Vater, zieht auf der Suche nach ritterlicher Bewährung in den Orient, wo er der schwarzen Heidenkönigin Belakane begegnet. In der uns interessierenden Szene wird Gahmuret von Belakane königlich bewirtet und noch dazu eigenhändig bedient:
diu küneginne rîche
kom stolzlîch für sînen tisch.
hie stuont der reiger, dort der visch.
si was durch das hinz im gevarn,
si wolde selbe daz bewarn
daz man sîn pflæge wol ze frumen:
si was mit juncfrouwen kumen.
si kniete nider (daz was im leit),
mit ir selber hant si sneit
dem rîter sîner spîse ein teil. (V. 33,2-11)
Die Königin, in ihrem Glanz, || trat selbstbewusst an seinen Tisch – || hier gab’s Reiher, dort gab’s Fisch. || Sie war aus diesem Grund gekommen: || sie wollte selber dafür sorgen, || dass man ihn ganz nach Wunsch bediene! || Junge Damen folgten ihr. || Sie kniete hin – es war ihm peinlich; || eigenhändig schnitt sie ihm || einen Teil der Speisen vor. (V. 33,2-11) [3]
Das Verspeisen von Reihern im Mittelalter ist eher eine umstrittene Frage. Kontrovers gehen einige Wissenschaftler davon aus, dass Reiher wie auch Störche und Schwäne als Speisevögel nicht so ungewöhnlich für den Adel waren (so Ernst Schubert 2006) [4], wohingegen andere auf die Seltenheit und besondere Eigenart dieses Brauchs im Mittelalter verweisen (so Joachim Bumke 2005) [5]. Dieser Hintergrund lässt uns in der vorliegenden Speiseszene eine zweifache Konnotation vermuten. Zum einem zeigt die Formulierung hie stuont der reiger, dort der visch die Exklusivität und Exotik wie auch die Vielseitigkeit der dargebotenen Speisen: Reiher und Fisch jeweils als pars pro toto für Wildvögel und Speisetiere (vgl. Anna Kathrin Bleuler 2016) [6]. Zum anderen können Reiher und Fisch als Jäger und Beute auf Belakane und Gahmuret in doppelter Zuordnung übertragen werden: So jagt (hier: umwirbt) der Reiher Belakane den Fisch Gahmuret, bzw. der Fisch Belakane bietet sich dem Reiher Gahmuret an. Die Zugehörigkeit dieser Tiere zu den unterschiedlichen Lebensbereichen (Luft und Wasser) verweist möglicherweise auch auf die unterschiedliche Herkunft von Belakane und Gahmuret.

Dabei ist in Betracht zu ziehen, dass das Mittelalter oft auch weitere, aus moderner Sicht nicht immer offensichtliche Proprietäten (Eigenschaften) mit verschiedenen Tieren assoziiert. So gilt z. B. das Rebhuhn (Abb. 2) seit der Antike (vgl. Plinius, Naturalis Historia) als Vogel, dem maßlose Geilheit zu eigen ist (intemperantia libidinis), und auf diese Weise bekommen Szenen mit Rebhühnern eine zusätzliche semantische, d.h. eine sexuell-erotische Ebene (etwa Anspielungen auf Vergewaltigungen, Geschlechtsverwechslungen). In diesem Zusammenhang entsteht aber das methodische Problem, welche Proprietäten von den lebenden Tieren relevant sind und ob sie überhaupt anwendbar sind, wenn es sich um verspeiste Tiere handelt.


Abb. 2: Zwei Rebhühner. Quelle: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4392693.


Fazit des ersten Teils

Zum Abschluss des ersten Teils ihres Vortrages betonte Prof. Dr. Obermaier die besondere Ergiebigkeit der Analyse von mittelalterlichen Speiseszenen mit Fokus auf den verspeisten Tieren. Sie dienen oft der Charakterisierung der Speisenden oder bestätigen mindestens die im Text schon vorhandene Charakterisierung der Protagonisten (auch ex negativo, z.B. wenn jemand auf das besondere Essen verzichtet). Die Tiere können der Szene einen breiteren Verständnis-Horizont geben oder intratextuelle Bezüge schaffen. Es gibt aber kein Beispiel in der mittelalterlichen Literatur, wo die Eigenschaften des verspeisten Tieres auf den Essenden übergehen. Speisetiere sind als Metaphern zu verstehen und nur in diesem Sinne gilt: „Du bist das Tier, das du isst“.

Animal turn./!/?

Der zweite Teil des Vortrages war dem sogenannten animal turn in der modernen Wissenschaft gewidmet, indem Prof. Dr. Obermaier über die theoretisch-methodischen Ansätze der jungen animal studies resp. Cultural Literary Animal Studies (CLAS) reflektierte.

Der animal turn (Begriff von Harriet Ritwo) führte zu einem radikalen Umdenken in den modernen Geistes- und Kulturwissenschaften: So wird die kategoriale Differenz zwischen Tier und Mensch massiv in Frage gestellt. Können die Tiere als Akteure mit agency verstanden werden (zugespitzt: Tiere machen Dichtung, CLAS) oder sind, wie Prof. Dr. Obermaier betonte, Tiere wie auch andere Literaturwesen von Menschen ausgedacht und müssen daher als reine Objekte behandelt werden?

In den CLAS teilt man die Tiere in diegetische vs. non-diegetische/semiotische und realistische vs. phantastische Tiere ein (Roland Borgards 2016) [7]. Dabei sind die für uns interessanten Speisetiere diegetisch und realistisch, denn sie haben als Lebewesen (obwohl getötet und verspeist) ihren Platz in der erzählten Welt und handeln in einem in unserer Welt gängigen Modus. Die Referentin ging aber davon aus, dass auch diegetischen Tieren ein semantischer Mehrwert zukommen kann, womit sie eine Qualität erhalten, die für non-diegetische/semiotische Tiere charakteristisch ist. Es stellt sich in diesem Zusammenhang auch die Frage, ob die verspeisten Tiere im Mittelalter als Tiere oder als Fleisch wahrgenommen wurden. In der mittelhochdeutschen Literatur sind Beispiele für beide Auffassungen zu finden: so bezeichnet man einerseits die verspeisten Tiere als rinder, shaf, swîn (also als Rind, Schaf und Schwein), andererseits als wilt, zam, bachen (Wildbret, Fleisch von gezähmten Tieren, Schinken) usw.

Den CLAS liegen drei Prinzipien zugrunde – Kontextualisieren, Historisieren und Poetisieren –, die sich auf das methodische Vorgehen stark auswirken (Borgards 2016). So verweist die erste Grundregel darauf, dass ein Tiertext immer in Zusammenhang mit anderen außerliterarischen Tierkontexten wie Jagd, Zoologie usw. betrachtet werden muss. Für die Interpretation eines literarischen Tieres braucht man eine diskursübergreifende Rekonstruktion des Wissens über das Tier. Eine Rekonstruktion solcher Art ist eines der vorrangigen Anliegen des GRK 1876. In den CLAS ist die Erschließung des Konzeptes aber nicht das Ziel, sondern die Voraussetzung. Das zweite Prinzip, Historisieren, weist auf die Relevanz/Irrelevanz einiger Kontexte bei der Tierinterpretation hin. Mit der letzten Grundregel ist gemeint, dass die Tierkontexte auch vom literarischen Text neu erschlossen sein können. Fundamental neu in den CLAS ist aber die Aufhebung der Trennung zwischen echten und literarischen Tieren, also der Ansatz, sowohl echte als auch literarische Tiere als materiell-symbolische Mischwesen zu betrachten. Daraus folgend ist es möglich, die literarischen Texte als Dokument einer Kultur zu betrachten, was aber von Literaturwissenschaftlern eher skeptisch betrachtet wird. Die Frage, ob der animal turn eine kurzfristige Mode ist, bleibt daher offen.

Abschließendes Fazit

Abschließend betonte Prof. Dr. Obermaier, dass literarische (Speise-)Tiere simultan Bedeutungsträger und Tiere sind, also Tiere und Zeichen zugleich („materiell-semiotische Mischwesen“ nach Borgards 2016). Kein Tier ist in dem Text ein Zufall, deswegen lohnt es sich auch nur am Rande erwähnte Tiere zu interpretieren. Aber man kann die literarischen Tiere nur bedingt als „Akteure“ betrachten, denn über die ganze Deutungshoheit verfügen doch Autor und Leser.

Fußnoten:
[1] Wernher der Gartenaere. Helmbrecht. Hrsg. von Fritz Tschirch. Stuttgart 2002.
[2] 308 V. Cod. Pal. germ. 848. Große Heidelberger Liederhandschrift (Codex Manesse) — Zürich, ca. 1300 bis ca. 1340. Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg: HeidICON. Die Heidelberger Bilddatenbank. http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/cpg848/0612 [Zugriff am 19.03.2017]. Zur abgebildeten Szene vgl. Codex Manesse. Die Miniaturen der Großen Heidelberger Liederhandschrift. Hrsg. von Ingo F. Walther unter Mitarbeit von Gisela Siebert. Frankfurt am Main 1988.

[3] Wolfram von Eschenbach: Parzival. Band 1. Nach der Ausgabe Karl Lachmanns revidiert und kommentiert von Eberhard Nellmann. Übertragen von Dieter Kühn. Frankfurt am Main 1994.
[4] Schubert, Ernst: Essen und Trinken im Mittelalter. Darmstadt 2006, (3)2016.
[5] Bumke, Joachim: Höfische Kultur. Literatur und Gesellschaft im hohen Mittelalter. München 2005.
[6] Bleuler, Anna Kathrin: Essen – Trinken – Liebe. Kultursemiotische Untersuchungen zur Poetik des Alimentären in Wolframs ‘Parzival’. Tübingen 2016.
[7] Borgards, Roland (Hrsg.): Tiere. Kulturwissenschaftliches Handbuch. Stuttgart 2016.

Konzeptbegriff(e) im GRK

Ein Beitrag von Marie-Charlotte v. Lehsten.

In der Plenumssitzung am 19. Januar 2017 widmeten sich die versammelten Mitglieder des GRKs der Erörterung ihres Konzeptbegriffes. Die Frage nach Konzepten ist eines der grundlegenden Elemente der thematischen Ausrichtung des GRKs und so müssen bzw. mussten sich alle Promovenden in ihrer Arbeit auch damit auseinandersetzen, was genau unter einem „Konzept“ zu verstehen ist.

Da inzwischen manche Dissertationen bereits abgeschlossen sind und einige sich in der finalen Phase befinden, während die neue Generation gerade ihre Arbeit aufnimmt, bot sich der Zeitpunkt an, um zusammenzutragen und zu reflektieren, welche Konzeptbegriffe sich für die einzelnen Untersuchungen am tragfähigsten erweisen und inwieweit diese unter Umständen konvergieren. Besonders spannend war diese Frage vor dem Hintergrund, dass vom GRK von Beginn an bewusst keine Konzeptdefinition vorgegeben worden war, mit dem Ziel, ein möglichst differenziertes und den jeweiligen Untersuchungsfeldern gerecht werdendes Spektrum zu erhalten, bei dem etwaige Übereinstimmungen nicht durch vorherige Beeinflussung zustande kommen.
In einem ersten Beitrag stellte GRK-Sprecherin Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening die Behandlung des Begriffes „Konzept“ im Einrichtungsantrag des GRKs vor: Unter Verzicht auf eine konkrete Definition wurden hier vor allem zu erforschende inhaltliche Aspekte von Konzepten (z.B. deren mediale Vermittlung, ihre Entstehung, lokale und temporale Ausprägung etc.) sowie methodische Grundsätze für deren Untersuchung erläutert und als Zielsetzung ein Vergleich der in den einzelnen Dissertationen herausgearbeiteten Konzepte formuliert. Definitorische Hinweise bot eine Zusammenstellung von Synonymen für den Begriff „Konzept“.
Zudem präsentierte Frau Pommerening das im Antrag vorgestellte Beispiel, die Betrachtung von Konzepten der Unfruchtbarkeit im Alten Ägypten und im antiken Griechenland: In beiden Bereichen stieße man auf Texte mit fast identischem Inhalt (Beschreibung eines Prognosemittels hinsichtlich der Sterilität von Frauen), bei denen aber die hinter dem empfohlenen Vorgehen und den Bestandteilen des anzuwendenden Präparats stehenden Konzepte in beiden Kulturen unterschiedlich sind: Im ersten Fall findet eine Übertragung von bestimmten Elementen eines komplexen mythologischen Hintergrunds statt, im zweiten wurde die geschilderte Praxis aus der anderen Kultur übernommen und hat daher mutmaßlich eine neue konzeptuelle Einbindung erfahren.
 

Grundlegende Merkmale von Konzepten

Aus den Reihen der Doktoranden präsentierte zunächst Mari Yamasaki die von der jüngsten Generation gemeinsam erarbeiteten grundlegenden Facetten von Konzepten: Konzepte lassen sich im weitesten Sinne als gedankliche Konstrukte der Organisation von Wissen über einen bestimmten Gegenstand beschreiben. Dabei können Konzepte von eng verbundenen Phänomenen in horizontal und vertikal gegliederten Rastern angeordnet werden; Konzepte können einander beeinflussen, flexibel ineinander übergehen oder an ihren Schnittstellen neue Konzeptbildungen erkennen lassen (vgl. Abb. 1).




Abb. 1: Konzeptdarstellung anhand eines Venn-Diagramms (von Oxana Polozhentseva).

Der Rahmen dessen, was ein Konzept umfasst, kann unterschiedlich weit sein und sich nicht nur auf konkrete Entitäten, sondern auch auf Abstrakta oder Vorgänge beziehen. Gerade bei der Beschäftigung mit der ferneren Vergangenheit ergeben sich aber auch gewisse Grenzen der Ergründung von Konzepten, für die nur begrenztes Material vorhanden ist. Auch gilt es, eine Sensibilität für die Differenzierung zwischen literarischen und wirklichkeitsempirischen Konzepten zu entwickeln. Ein weiterer, etwas spezifischerer Ansatz ist das Verständnis von Konzepten als rekonstruktive Modelle, die ein Forscher im Zuge der Interpretation von Phänomen entwickelt.
 

Konzepte und kulturelles Wissen

Im Folgenden sprach Dominic Bärsch über den Konzeptbegriff in seinem Projekt „Weltuntergänge. Konzepte von Auflösung in der griechischen und lateinischen Literatur“, bei dem er sich mit der Besonderheit auseinanderzusetzen hat, dass ein Weltuntergang nicht nur ein abstraktes, sondern auch ein noch nie real erlebtes Szenario darstellt – es kann also keine Prototypik für das Phänomen geben. Dabei erweist es sich am praktikabelsten, von mehreren Einzelkonzepten des Weltuntergangs auszugehen, die abhängig von Textsorte und Kontext jeweils literarisch und diskursiv geformt sind – etwa einem Konzept der Ekpyrosis bei einem bestimmten Autor. Diese Konzepte setzen sich aus Bausteinen des kulturellen Wissens zusammen, worunter „die Gesamtmenge der Propositionen, die die Mitglieder einer Kultur für wahr halten bzw. die eine hinreichende Anzahl von Texten der Kultur als wahr setzt“ zu verstehen ist (Fn.1). Zur Ermittlung dieser Propositionen sind wiederum literaturwissenschaftliche Methoden anzuwenden, wie etwa die Untersuchung von Intertextualität und narrativen Strukturen.
 

Konzeptuelle Metaphern

Schließlich präsentierte Victoria Altmann-Wendling das von G. Lakoff und M. Johnson erarbeitete (Fn. 2) und auch kognitionswissenschaftlich bestätigte Modell konzeptueller Metaphern, das sich für ihre Arbeit über den Mond in den religiösen Texten des griechisch-römischen Ägypten als fruchtbar erwiesen hat. Die kognitive Linguistik versteht Metaphern nicht bloß als sprachliches Stilmittel der Verknüpfung ähnlicher Bereiche, sondern als Verbindung verschiedener Konzepte mittels struktureller Ähnlichkeiten, als Transport von Bedeutungen von einem Ursprungs- in einen Zielbereich. Dies geschieht sowohl in literarischen Texten als auch in vielen Wendungen der Alltagssprache und dient häufig der Veranschaulichung, etwa wenn Elemente aus einem bekannteren in einen abstrakteren Bereich übertragen werden.
So lassen sich anhand von Metaphern (etwa wenn der Mond in ägyptischen Texten als Kind oder als Auge bezeichnet wird) Rückschlüsse über die Eigenschaften ziehen, die dem Mond zugeschrieben werden. Diese müssen dabei gar nicht konkret verbalisiert sein: Das Augenmerk liegt vor allem darauf, welche Aspekte des Ausgangskonzeptes in den Aussagen impliziert werden. Zu berücksichtigen ist generell, dass die metaphorischen Aussagen meist asymmetrisch nur in eine Richtung zu denken sind und dass die Übertragung auch nicht alle, sondern nur bestimmte Aspekte umfasst. Verschiedene Metaphern können sich überschneiden und ergänzen und – sofern sie verschiedene Aspekte eines Gegenstands beleuchten – auch scheinbare Widersprüche produzieren.
 

Diskussion

In der abschließenden Diskussion wurde als grundsätzliche Fragestellung die Unterscheidung zwischen dem Modell „Metakonzept und (Teil-)Konzepte“ und dem Modell „Konzept und Konzeptbestandteile (nämlich Eigenschaften bzw. proprietates des betrachteten Gegenstands)“ in den Raum gestellt. Zum einen könnte hier lediglich von einer unterschiedlichen Terminologie für einen im Großen und Ganzen ähnlichen Sachverhalt ausgegangen werden, zum anderen ist es denkbar, den Begriff „Metakonzept“ auf einer anderen Ebene anzusiedeln und so zwischen zwei unterschiedlichen Perspektiven zu unterscheiden (und damit auch eine Ambivalenz zu konkretisieren, die bereits in allen Beiträgen der Sitzung in irgendeiner Weise angeklungen war): Auf der einen Seite steht das Streben nach einer Rekonstruktion „historischer“ Konzepte bzw. das Ergründen literarischer Konzepte ausgehend von Texten und evtl. deren Autoren; auf der anderen Seite die Konstruktion von „Metakonzepten“ durch den Forscher als eine Art theoretisch-methodische Verstehenshilfe, die sich ihrer Artifizialität bewusst ist.
Fußnoten:
(1) M. Titzmann, Kulturelles Wissen – Diskurs – Denksystem, in: Zeitschrift für Französische Sprache und Literatur 99 (1989), 47-60, hier: 49.
(2) Leben in Metaphern. Konstruktion und Gebrauch von Sprachbildern. Heidelberg 2003.

Forschungsaufenthalt in der Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, D.C.

Ein Beitrag von Tristan Schmidt.

Vom 1. bis zum 15. Dezember 2016 verbrachte ich einen Forschungsaufenthalt an der Dumbarton Oaks Research Library in Washington, D.C. Bei der im alten Stadtteil Georgetown gelegenen Anlage handelt es sich um eine Forschungsbibliothek mit angeschlossenem Museum, das von den Trustees der Harvard University verwaltet wird. Es ging aus dem Besitz des wohlhabenden und in Politik und Gesellschaft bedeutenden Washingtoner Ehepaares Robert und Mildred Bliss hervor, die ihr Anwesen 1940 in eine Stiftung umwandelten, der sie auch ihre umfangreiche Kunstsammlung übereigneten. Daneben bietet das im Jahr 1800 erbaute Landhaus, das das Museum und Teile der Verwaltung beherbergt, eine weitläufige Gartenanlage aus der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts, die von der Landschaftsarchitektin Beatrix Farrand entworfen wurde (s. Abb. 1 und 2).
Abb. 1: Gartenimpression in Dumbarton Oaks (Foto: Tristan Schmidt).


Wissenschaftler aus den Bereichen Byzantinistik, Garten- und Landschaftsstudien sowie präkolumbianische Studien können in Dumbarton Oaks als „Resident Scholars“ und als „Fellows“ ihren Forschungen nachgehen. Für die Byzantinistik besonders attraktiv ist die umfangreiche, praktisch alle für das Fach relevante Literatur umfassende Bibliothek, ferner eine Siegelkollektion sowie die Museumskollektion mit zahlreichen Artefakten der byzantinischen Kultur. Mit den „Dumbarton Oaks Papers“ ist zudem eines der renommiertesten Publikationsorgane des Fachs dort angesiedelt.
Während des Aufenthalts, der über ein „Short Term Pre-Doctoral Residency“-Stipendium von Dumbarton Oaks (Unterkunft und Verpflegung) sowie dem Graduiertenkolleg 1876 (Flug) finanziert wurde, konnte ich ein weiteres Kapitel meiner Dissertation fertigstellen. Darüber hinaus bot der Austausch mit anderen „Resident Scholars“ und „Fellows“ wichtige Impulse für die weitere Arbeit, etwa im Bereich der literarischen Tierstudien oder bei Fragen der kunstgeschichtlichen Forschung zu Tierdarstellungen in Byzanz. Daneben boten die wöchentlich stattfindenden „Research Reports“ der  „Fellows“ einen Einblick in die weiteren, derzeit in Dumbarton Oaks bearbeiteten Forschungsprojekte. 

Abb. 2: Garten und Gästehaus in Dumbarton Oaks (Foto: Tristan Schmidt).



Siebtes Treffen des Berliner Arbeitskreises Junge Aegyptologie (BAJA 7)

Ein Beitrag von Simone Gerhards.

Am Wochenende vom 2. bis 4. Dezember 2016 fand an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin das 7. Treffen des Berliner Arbeitskreises Junge Aegyptologie (BAJA) statt, der sich in diesem Jahr mit dem Themenkreis „Funktion/en: Materielle Kultur – Sprache – Religion“ auseinandersetzte. Das Treffen des Berliner Arbeitskreises ist ein beliebter Rahmen für fachlichen Austausch, Informations- und Kontaktaufnahme und mittlerweile für Nachwuchswissenschaftler/innen fester Bestandteil des jährlichen ägyptologischen Veranstaltungskalenders. Das diesjährige Treffen bot eine äußerst abwechslungsreiche Auswahl an spannenden Vorträgen, die Einblicke in laufende und abgeschlossene Abschlussarbeiten, Projekte und Grabungen gab. Organisiert wurde das Treffen von Univ.-Prof. Dr. Alexandra Verbovsek und ihrem engagierten Team mit Unterstützung der Ägyptologischen Forschungsstätte für Kulturwissenschaft der Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg. Die Moderationen übernahmen Univ.-Prof. Dr. Richard Bußmann (Ägyptologie, Universität zu Köln) und PD Dr. Dietrich Raue (Kustos am Ägyptischen Museum – Georg Steindorff – Universität Leipzig). Neben Simone Gerhards und Sonja Speck, beide Kollegiatinnen des Graduiertenkollegs, nahmen drei weitere Mainzer Doktorand(inn)en am BAJA 7-Treffen teil.
Auftakt der Tagung bildeten die Grußworte des Organisationsteams sowie die Eröffnungsvorträge von PD Dr. Raue und Univ.-Prof. Dr. Bußmann, die in die Thematik „Funktion/en“ einführten. Im Anschluss gab es einen Empfang, bei dem erste Kontakte zu weiteren Forscherinnen und Forschern geknüpft werden konnten.

Funktion/en: vielfältig – differenziert – revidiert

Der Samstagmorgen startete mit zwei Vorträgen von Mitgliedern des BAJA-Teams zur ägyptischen Prä- und Frühdynastik: Catherine Jones (München, LMU) stellte ihre Überlegungen zur Funktion von Gardiner-Zeichen 019 „zoomorphe Struktur“ vor, während Tilmann Kunze (Berlin, HU) die Ergebnisse seiner Masterarbeit zum Thema „Das Grab als Wohnhaus“ präsentierte und bestehende Forschermeinungen genau unter die Lupe nahm. 
Nach einer kurzen Kaffeepause berichteten Frederike Junge und Nora Kuch (Wien) von groß- und kleinformatigen Funden im Bestattungskontext der Gräber von Helwan, Operation 4 (Helwan-Projekt der Universität Wien), die teilweise als einmalig anzusehen sind. Anschließend stellte Dina Serova (Berlin, HU) – Mitglied des diesjährigen BAJA-Teams – erste Ergebnisse ihres Dissertationsprojekts zum Thema Nacktheit in Gräbern des Alten Reichs vor, wobei auch sie einen ihrer Schwerpunkte auf eine Neubewertung bestehender Forschermeinungen legte. 
Nachdem sich alle bei einer Mittagspause gestärkt hatten, begann Anna Grünberg (Leipzig) die Nachmittags-Session mit einem wissenschaftshistorischen Vortrag über ihre kürzlich abgeschlossene Bachelorarbeit zu den Bestattungsweisen des Alten Reichs in Giza, die sie auf Grundlage der Archivalien des Ägyptischen Museums – Georg Steindorff – der Universität Leipzig rekonstruierte. Anschließend stellte Vera Michel (Heidelberg), Mitarbeiterin am FWF-Projekt „Abläufe einer ägyptischen Stadt – Fallstudie Tell el-Dab’a“ des Österreichischen Archäologischen Instituts, drei Lehmfigurinen vor, die bei Grabungen in Tell el-Dab’a entdeckt wurden und bisher schwer einzuordnen sind. Patrizia Heindl (München, LMU) widmete ihre Präsentation im Folgenden ihrer bereits abgeschlossenen Masterarbeit. In dieser interpretierte sie mithilfe einer hermeneutischen Analyse der Rundplastik die Felidenfellträgerstatuen des Monthemhat neu. Einen ersten Vorbericht zu ihrem laufenden Dissertationsprojekt gab im Anschluss Jana Raffel (Leipzig), die die Rollen und Interaktionsmuster altägyptischer Gottheiten in Heiltexten analysierte. Nach einer letzten Kaffeepause des Tages sprach Uroš Matić (Münster) über Ars Erotica in Bezug auf ägyptische Gottheiten. Mit einem diachronen Überblick zu schriftlichen und materiellen Hinterlassenschaften zeigte er den Variantenreichtum der sexuellen Interaktion zwischen Göttern untereinander sowie Göttern und Menschen. Agnes Klische (Mainz) gab im Anschluss eine Bestandsaufnahme der „Trennungsszene“ der Götter Geb und Nut und zeigte, dass bei dieser Motivik ein großer Variantenreichtum vorliegt. Der letzte Vortrag des Samstags wurde von Simone Gerhards, der Autorin dieses Blogbeitrags, über die Metapher „Tod ist Schlaf“ gehalten. Im Fokus standen zum einen Überlegungen zu deren Universalität, da die Metapher in fast allen Kulturen und Zeiten verwendet worden zu sein scheint, und zum anderen eine methodische Herangehensweise, um kulturelle Spezifitäten in Bezug auf das alte Ägypten herauszuarbeiten. Damit ging der zweite Tag in das Abendprogramm mit äußerst schmackhafter Altberliner Küche über, bei dem die anregenden Diskussionen des Tages bis in den Abend vertieft wurden. 

Objekt: Funktion vs. Bedeutung?

Julia Preisigke (München, LMU) eröffnete mit ihrem Vortrag über die Bittplätze bzw. Gegentempel den dritten und letzten Tag des Treffens. Sie nutzt für ihre Forschungen unter anderem das Open-Source-Programm DepthmapX, um Blickrichtungen und Schrittfolge von Tempelbesuchern zu simulieren und zu zeigen, dass die Bittplätze, anders als bisher vermutet, architektonisch abgeschirmt waren und daher auch deren Funktion nicht eindeutig ist. Im Anschluss sprach Julianna Kitti Paksi (Basel/Paris) über die Hammamat-Inschrift Ramses IV. und ihr Promotionsvorhaben, das eine Untersuchung der Funktionen der linguistischen Varietät in den ramessidischen Texten zum Ziel hat. Julienne Schrauder berichtete über ihr kürzlich begonnenes Dissertationsprojekt zu einigen, bisher unpublizierten, koptischen Manuskripten aus der Heidelberger Papyrussammlung. Den letzten Vortrag der Tagung hielt Ghada Mohammed (Bonn), in dem sie ihre Überlegungen zu Form, Funktion und Bedeutung von personifizierten Zeichen im alten Ägypten vorstellte. Ihr besonderes Augenmerk lag auf den Darstellungen der Anch- sowie Was-Zeichen, die mit Armen und/oder Beinen auftreten können. In der folgenden Abschlussdiskussion wurden noch einmal offenen gebliebene Fragen angesprochen sowie zum Themenkreis „Funktion/en“ festgehalten, dass ein „Objekt“ neben einer oder mehreren Funktion/en auch eine oder mehrere Bedeutungen haben kann.
Am Sonntagnachmittag hatten die „Bajaner/innen“ nach einem gemeinsamen Mittagessen noch Gelegenheit, das Ägyptische Museum und die Papyrussammlung der staatlichen Museen zu Berlin auf eigene Faust zu erkunden. 
Unser Dank gilt Univ.-Prof. Alexandra Verbovsek und ihrem Organisations-Team, den Moderatoren, Vortragenden, Diskutant(inn)en sowie allen weiteren Teilnehmer(inn)en für ein gelungenes, informationsreiches und spannendes Wochenende im vorweihnachtlichen Berlin.

Vortrag von Prof. Dr. Marianne Bechhaus-Gerst – „Sie ziehen auf Kamelen in die Schlacht und werfen ihre Speere.“ Beja (Sudan) Identität und Kamelwirtschaft in historischer Perspektive

Ein Beitrag von Mirna Kjorveziroska.
 
Im Rahmen der interdisziplinären Ringvorlesung „Kult, Kunst und Konsum – Tiere in alten Kulturen“ hielt am 15. Dezember 2016 Prof. Dr. Marianne Bechhaus-Gerst (Universität zu Köln) einen Vortrag über die praktischen Funktionen und kulturellen Semantiken des Kamels bei den Beja, einer nordostafrikanischen Ethnie. Da die Afrikanistik im Fächerspektrum des Graduiertenkollegs nicht vertreten ist, sollte der Vortrag – wie auch der am 10. November 2016 veranstaltete Workshop mit Bechhaus-Gerst während ihres Aufenthalts als Gastwissenschaftlerin am GRK – die Auseinandersetzung mit der grundlegenden binären Chiffre „Spezifität–Universalität“ intensivieren und die (Nicht-)Übertragbarkeit der im Graduiertenkolleg herausgearbeiteten Konzepte aufzeigen.
 

Historische und geographische Koordinaten der Beja

Die Beja bewohnen den Sudan, Teile von Eritrea und Ägypten, bzw. den Raum zwischen dem Nil und dem Roten Meer. Definierbar als eine ethnische Gruppe von 1,5 bis 2 Millionen Personen sind sie in erster Linie durch die gemeinsame, als kuschitisch zu klassifizierende Sprache, wobei meistens auch eine weitere Sprachkompetenz, nämlich Kenntnisse des Arabischen, vorauszusetzen ist. Im 6. Jahrhundert wurden sie christianisiert, im 15. Jahrhundert konvertierten sie zum Islam. Die „dezente Marginalisierung“, die die Beja heutzutage erleiden, steht im Kontrast zu ihrer früheren politischen Einbindung: Sie waren durch ein Vasallenverhältnis mit großen weltgeschichtlichen Entitäten wie dem Römischen und später dem Byzantinischen Reich verbunden. Die historischen Informationen über die Beja basieren größtenteils auf Fremdquellen (zum Teil unter der antiken Bezeichnung „Blemmyer“), die die generelle, bei ihrer Auswertung stets zu bedenkende Tendenz aufweisen, die Beja-Beschreibungen als Projektionsfläche für diverse Imaginationen des Anderen zu instrumentalisieren, von dem es sich abzugrenzen gilt. Seit dem 5. Jahrhundert sind auch schriftliche Quellen der Beja selbst überliefert, allerdings handelt es sich dabei fast ausschließlich um diplomatische Korrespondenz auf Koptisch oder Griechisch. 
 

Ökonomische Aspekte: Kamelkarawanen

Versucht man, die Verbindung zwischen den Beja und den Kamelen zu datieren, wird man mit divergierenden Forschungsmeinungen konfrontiert, die sich auf eine grobe gemeinsame Aussage reduzieren lassen, dass die interessierende Verbindung um die Zeitenwende bereits vorhanden gewesen sein muss. Die Einführung des Kamels hat die Mobilität der Beja maximiert, sodass sie sich der weiten Wüste nunmehr bemächtigen konnten. Sie kontrollierten die dort befindlichen Smaragd- und Goldminen und indem die Kamele als Lasttiere den Transport der Kostbarkeiten ermöglichten, etablierte sich ein Karawanenhandel, der bis ins 19. Jahrhundert hinein als wichtigste Einnahmequelle für die Beja galt. Mathematisch waren die Karawanen folgendermaßen konfiguriert: Sie umfassten 500 bis 1500 Kamele, wobei je ein Mann für die Versorgung von vier Tieren verantwortlich war. Vor diesem Hintergrund wurden also die Kamele mit dem Wohlstand der Beja assoziiert – nicht zuletzt infolge der Kontiguität mit den Kostbarkeiten, mit denen man sie belud.
 

Gender-Aspekte: Konstruktion von Männlichkeit

Das Kriegertum der Beja stellte für ihre Gegner und Beobachter ein Faszinosum dar, für dessen ästhetische Artikulation das Gedicht Fuzzy Wuzzy von Rudyard Kipling als Paradigma fungiert. Als konstitutive Elemente des Bildes eines Beja-Kriegers wurden die Waffe, das Kamel und die wilden lockigen Haare aufgefasst. Die Reitkunst, die Geschicklichkeit im Umgang mit dem Kamel war als Demonstration von Männlichkeit kodiert; ferner wurde die Kamelmilch als Katalysator von physischen Qualitäten wie Stärke und Attraktivität des Helden mit dem männlichen Schönheitsideal in Korrelation gebracht. Wie genderexklusiv das Kamel konnotiert wurde, können auch einige den Frauen auferlegte Restriktionen bei den täglichen Praktiken illustrieren, etwa dass weiblichen Beja das Melken von Kamelen verboten war. Im Fall der Kamele erscheint die Gender-Logik hingegen invertiert – die weiblichen Tiere wurden infolge ihrer Rolle im Fortpflanzungsprozess aber auch als Reittiere höher geschätzt. Diese Privilegierung manifestiert sich auch darin, dass zur Bewirtung wichtiger Gäste, als ultimativer Gestus der Gastfreundschaft, ausschließlich männliche Kamele geschlachtet wurden, die allgemein weniger vielseitig genutzt werden konnten.
 
Die enge Verbindung zwischen dem Krieger und seinem Kamel lässt sich als Analogon der für die europäische Mediävistik überaus relevanten, in zahlreichen Texten exemplifizierten Relation zwischen dem Ritter und seinem Pferd interpretieren, wodurch ein im Graduiertenkolleg vertretenes Fach apostrophiert wird. Vor dem Hintergrund dieser Parallelisierung der beiden Konstellationen erscheint das Tier, das dem Helden in einer kulturellen Formation zugeordnet wird, als Variable, die sich unterschiedlich (um-)besetzen lässt. Es wird also eine Alternative, ein Substitut des den Mediävisten gut bekannten Pferdes präsentiert, das seine Rolle bei der Modellierung eines Heldenbildes zu übernehmen vermag – eine holzschnittartige Beobachtung, die weitergedacht werden soll, um nicht nur die funktionale Ähnlichkeit zu exponieren, sondern auch die Feintextur der Unterschiede zwischen dem Kamel und dem Pferd als Begleiter des Kämpfers herauszuarbeiten.
 

Sprachliche Aspekte: Zeit- und Raumangaben

Der Umgang mit Kamelen und deren Versorgung war für die Beja ein essentieller Bestandteil des Alltags, eine den Tagesablauf diktierende Routine und beeinflusste ihre Konzeptualisierung von Zeit und Raum. So hat sich ein differenzierter Set von Lexemen entwickelt, die den physiologischen Rhythmus der Kameltränkung als Strukturierungsinstrument des zeitlichen Kontinuums bzw. als Referenzpunkt für Zeitabschnitte postulieren, sodass es je eine separate Vokabel gibt, die etwa das Gehen zur Tränke, die Rückkehr von der Tränke, den ersten oder den zweiten Tag ohne Tränkung bezeichnet und somit als Zeitangabe funktioniert. Ähnlich lässt sich die linguistische Besonderheit beobachten, dass ein einziges Verb komplexe Sachverhalte der Fortbewegung ausdrückt bzw. den Modus und die Richtung der mit Kamelen immer wieder unternommenen Streifzüge lapidar expliziert: „den ganzen Tag in der Hitze reiten, ohne einen Schatten zu finden“; „westlich vom Roten Meer reiten“; „auf das Rote Meer zureiten“ etc. Bemerkenswert sind also die starke Präsenz der Kamele im kognitiven Haushalt der Beja und die daraus resultierende linguistische Produktivität eines Tiers, das die Bildung zahlreicher Spezialtermini provoziert hat und ihrer Semantik in diversen Nuancierungen zugrunde liegt.

Animals in Greco-Roman Consciousness. A lecture by Prof. Stephen Newmyer

A weblog entry by Mari Yamasaki.

On December 1st 2016, within the Lecture Series „Kult, Kunst und Konsum – Tiere in alten Kulturen„, Prof. Stephen Newmyer (Duquesne University – Pittsburgh, PA) presented his lecture on the contradictions and interactions between humans and animals in Greco-Roman consciousness.

In the classical Greek philosophization of animals, we mostly witness a clear distinction between humans and animals, denoting a stark superiority of the former over the latter, mostly due to the success of the Aristotelian notion that man alone of all animals possesses intellect. However, as shown by Prof. Newmyer, the picture is more complex than it appears.

Whilst no significant reference to the animal world appears in the Homeric poems, Hesiod is the first to state a hierarchy in creation that puts Man above all other creatures. Humans and gods, although the latter remain infinitely superior to the former, are similar in their ability of producing reasoning, whereas the animals cannot. Such attitude of definite superiority of humans, and their belonging to a group distinct from that of animals, culminates in Aristotle. Not as extreme as the Stoics, who believe that animals solely exist to provide for humans, Aristotle firmly denies their intelligence (although he does make some concession on the qualities of some species).

This position, although predominant, was not the only one in the classical world. The Pre-Socratics, for instance, conceived a most modern approach to animals, recognizing in them emotions and some degree of intelligence. Empedocles considered immoral to eat animals, referring to them as „next of kin“, and Pythagoreans would not eat flesh on the principle of inter-species soul transmigration. Plutarch, among the classical authors is the one who most thoroughly discussed the human-animal relationship. In „On the Cleverness of Animals“, he hypothesizes an ability of producing language: one, however, that humans are incapable of understanding and that is therefore erroneously interpreted as meaningless noises. This concept is exemplified through the very powerful image of a crying beast led to the butcher. Again, in „On the Eating of Flesh“, he openly argues against the consumption of meat. His surprisingly modern positions remain mostly ignored due to the predominance of Aristotelian philosophy. These are found again, centuries later, in Neoplatonic Philosopher Porphyry (3rd, 4th centuries C.E.) who reprises very similar vegetarian positions in his treaty „On the Abstinence from Animal Food“.

The ever so pragmatic Roman world proved to be generally less sensitive to the topic of the cruelty towards animals. Practices of intensive-farming are often criticised by Roman authors, and both Pliny and Cicero dedicate a passage to the horrific show of animals being slaughtered in the arena during venationes, such as the one depicted in Figure 1. Even in these two examples, however, compassion mostly arises by the futility and tastelessness of such blood thirsty entertainment, rather than from a real sensitivity towards the animal world. A different attitude is found in regards to the beasts that have served in the army. Some form of respect is often shown for these „veterans“, whose service – in a similar way to their human counterparts – should be rewarded with a favourable retirement. 

Figure 1: Detail of a roman mosaic in discovered in Zliten, Lybia, dated 2nd century AD; currently on display at the Archaeological Museum of Tripoli.

The issue on the possession of intellect seems to revolve around a most critical philosophical question: do non-human animals have a soul? And would having a soul make them inedible? In fact, in the case of both Pythagoreans and Pre-Socratics, it is interesting how the possibility that animals might possess a soul is directly related to the reasons to refrain from the consumption of meat (for instance, the firm belief that animals possess souls did not stop other cultures from consuming meat, such as in Japan or among some Native American tribes).

Professor Newmyer’s lecture effectively reminded the audience how the issue on the morality of eating animals and, more generally, concerning their status in relation to humans has been at the centre of a centuries-long debate: one that to all intents and purposes still continues nowadays.

Vernetzungstreffen Mainz-Heidelberg

Ein Beitrag von Dominik Berrens.
Das Graduiertenkolleg 1876 „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ möchte künftig enger mit dem Heidelberger SFB 933 „Materiale Textkulturen“ zusammenarbeiten. Teilweise bestanden zwar bereits zuvor Kontakte zwischen einzelnen Mitgliedern beider Projekte (nicht zuletzt sind die Heidelberger Professoren Joachim Friedrich Quack und Stefan Maul Kooperationspartner des GRK), um aber die Möglichkeiten weiterer gemeinsamer Projekte auszuloten und um sich generell besser kennenzulernen, traf man sich in der Woche vom 05. bis 11.12.2016 gleich zweimal. 

Das GRK in Heidelberg

Am Montag, dem 05.12. machte sich daher eine recht große Delegation aus Mainz auf den Weg nach Heidelberg. Im Rahmen eines Kolloquiums konnte sich das GRK dort präsentieren. Nach einer kurzen Einführung in die Thematik und die Organisation des GRK durch die Sprecherin Tanja Pommerening stellten die beiden Doktorandinnen Imke Fleuren und Stephanie Mühlenfeld erste Ergebnisse aus ihren Promotionsprojekten vor. In einem Tandemvortrag beschäftigten sich beide mit den Konzepten vom Panther in den jeweils von ihnen untersuchten Kulturen. Eindrucksvoll konnten sie so die Möglichkeiten, aber auch die Schwierigkeiten der interdisziplinären Forschung im Rahmen des GRK demonstrieren. Sie zeigten, dass im Alten Ägypten und im mittelalterlichen Europa durchaus Ähnlichkeiten in den Eigenschaften der Pantherkonzepte nachweisbar sind, was auf eine mögliche Universalität oder eine Tradierung solcher Eigenschaften hindeuten könnte. Größtenteils dürften die Konzepte jedoch kulturell spezifisch geprägt sein. Nach den Vorträgen und der anschließenden Diskussion konnten in zwangloser Runde in einem Heidelberger Café Kontakte geknüpft und mögliche Formen der Zusammenarbeit besprochen werden.

Die Mainzer Delegation in der Heidelberger Altstadt (Foto: Sonja Gerke).

Gegenbesuch in Mainz

Der Gegenbesuch der Heidelberger in Mainz fand am Donnerstag, dem 08.12. statt. Im Rahmen der Plenumssitzung des GRK präsentierte der Sprecher des Heidelberger SFB, der germanistische Mediävist Ludger Lieb, kurz das Forschungsprogramm und den Aufbau des SFB. In 22 wissenschaftlichen Teilprojekten und drei sogenannten Serviceprojekten werden nicht nur schrifttragende Artefakte wie Papyri, Ostraka, Inschriften, Amulette etc. untersucht, sondern auch sogenannte Metatexte. Darunter sind Texte zu verstehen, die nicht real existieren, sondern in anderen Texten erzählt oder beschrieben werden. Im Fokus der Untersuchungen stehen dabei die Fragen nach der Materialität der jeweiligen Textträger, aber auch nach der Rolle der schrifttragenden Artefakte in ihrer jeweiligen Kultur, nach ihrer Herstellung und Nutzung und nach ihrer Präsentation.

Anschließend stellten drei Teilprojekte ihre Fragestellungen und erste Ergebnisse vor. Den Anfang machte der Ägyptologe Joachim Friedrich Quack, der eine Einführung in das interdisziplinäre Teilprojekt (A03) zur Materialität und Präsenz magischer Zeichen zwischen Antike und Mittelalter gab. Im Speziellen trug er dabei in Vertretung seiner erkrankten Doktorandin Carina Kühne erste Ergebnisse des ägyptologischen Unterprojekts (UP1) „Ächtungsfiguren und ihre Deponierung“ vor. Dabei handelt es sich um figürliche Darstellungen, auf denen eine Feindesliste aufgeschrieben ist. Die genaue Gestaltung dieser Figuren veränderte sich im Laufe der Zeit und reicht von eher abstrakten Darstellungen im Alten Reich zu individuell ausgearbeiteten in jüngerer Zeit. Dieser Wandel in der figürlichen Darstellung geht mit dem der Aufschrift einher. So erhalten die abstrakteren Figuren des Alten Reiches ihre Individualität durch eine konkretere Benennung der Feinde im Text, während die detaillierter ausgearbeiteten Figuren aus jüngerer Zeit keine genaueren Beschreibungen in Textform benötigen.

Als nächstes präsentierte die Alttestamentlerin Friederike Schücking-Jungblut ihr Projekt (C02 UP2) mit dem Titel „Zwischen Literatur und Liturgie – Pragmatik und Rezeptionspraxis poetischer/liturgischer Schriften der judäischen Wüste“. Mit ihrer Mitarbeiterin Anna Krauß untersucht sie die erhaltenen Schriftrollen etwa aus Qumran und versucht anhand verschiedener Faktoren (z. B. Format, Layout, Schreiberhände, Zusammenstellung der Texte etc.) Rückschlüsse auf ihre Verwendung zu gewinnen.

Als Beispiel zeigte Anna Krauß das kleine Fragment 4Q448, das vom Anfang einer Schriftrolle aus Leder stammt, deren Umfang jedoch nicht rekonstruiert werden kann. Interessanterweise sind darauf verschiedene Texte (ein Psalm sowie ein Text über König Jonathan Hammelech) erhalten, die auch von unterschiedlichen Händen verfasst wurden. Die genaue Verwendung und auch die Herkunft der Schriftrolle ist daher nicht sicher zu bestimmen und nach wie vor Gegenstand der wissenschaftlichen Debatte.

Zuletzt stellte Ludger Lieb sein eigenes Teilprojekt (C05) vor, das den Titel „Inschriftlichkeit. Reflexionen materialer Textkultur in der Literatur des 12. bis 17. Jahrhunderts“ trägt. Hierbei handelt es sich um ein Forschungsvorhaben, das sich nicht direkt mit schrifttragenden Artefakten beschäftigt, sondern mit den bereits erwähnten Metatexten, genauer mit Erzählungen über Inschriften oder Texte. Nach Herrn Liebs allgemeineren Ausführungen gab die Doktorandin Laura Velte Einblicke in die Methodik ihrer Dissertation. Sie reflektierte dabei den Begriff „Metatext“ und stellte ihre Theorie zu metanarrativen Verfahren in der Literatur des Mittelalters dar.

Nach jedem Vortrag bot sich ausreichend Raum für anregende Diskussionen, die bei einem gemeinsamen Abendessen noch weiter geführt werden konnten. Sicherlich können auch künftig beide Projekte fruchtbar zusammenarbeiten und von ihrer jeweiligen Expertise in methodischer und inhaltlicher Hinsicht profitieren.

Antrittsvorlesung von Prof. Dr. Alexander Pruß – Bildersturm: Ausmaß und Hintergrund von Kulturzerstörung im Nahen Osten

Ein Beitrag von Tim Brandes.
 
Im Sommersemester 2015 nahm Prof. Dr. Alexander Pruß den Ruf der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz an und ist seitdem Inhaber des Lehrstuhls für Vorderasiatische Archäologie in Mainz. Schon von Beginn an durfte ihn auch das Graduiertenkolleg „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ willkommen heißen, in dem er sogleich zum Mitglied des Trägerkreises wurde und seitdem maßgeblich zur Erweiterung des Themen- und Forschungsspektrums beigetragen hat.
 
Am 24.11.2016 hielt Herr Pruß nun seine Antrittsvorlesung an der Universität Mainz. Das Thema dieser Vorlesung weist zwar keine direkte Anlehnung an die Forschung des Graduiertenkollegs auf, soll an dieser Stelle aber dennoch Erwähnung finden, da es grundsätzlich alle Altertumswissenschaften berührt und im besonderen Maße natürlich diejenigen, die sich mit dem Alten Orient im weitesten Sinne beschäftigen.
In eben jener Vorlesung mit dem Titel „Bildersturm: Ausmaß und Hintergrund von Kulturzerstörung im Nahen Osten“ widmete sich Herr Pruß einem Thema, das vor dem Hintergrund der andauernden bewaffneten Konflikte  sowohl in Syrien als auch im Irak  eine leider allzu aktuelle Brisanz besitzt.
 

Medienwirksame Zerstörung antiker Stätten: Nimrud und Palmyra

Den Verlust für die Forschung machte Herr Pruß eingangs am Beispiel Nimruds fest, einer der Hauptstädte des neuassyrischen Reiches, das bis zum Ende des siebten Jahrhunderts v. Chr. die dominierende politische Macht des Vorderen Orients darstellte. Aus eben jener neuassyrischen Epoche sind unzählige schriftliche und bildliche Zeugnisse überliefert, die sich als unschätzbar wertvoll für die Erforschung des Alten Orients erwiesen haben. So stellen die neuassyrischen Reliefs, u.a. aus Nimrud, die wohl umfangreichste zusammengehörige Gruppe von Bildquellen aus dem Alten Orient insgesamt dar.
Gerade diese antike Ruinenstätte Nimrud hat in jüngster Zeit für traurige Schlagzeilen gesorgt, da sie medienwirksam und somit als deutliche Provokation vom sogenannten IS zerstört wurde. Doch Nimrud war bei weitem nicht die einzige kulturell bedeutsame Stätte, die diesem Schicksal anheim fiel: Inzwischen war mehrfach auch die ebenfalls bedeutsame Stadt Palmyra in Syrien das Ziel gezielter Zerstörungen. So wurde 2015 der bis dato gut erhaltene Baal-Tempel ebenfalls vom IS gesprengt.
 

Weitere, weniger bekannte Formen der Kulturzerstörung

Herr Pruß machte weiterhin darauf aufmerksam, dass diese medienwirksamen Zerstörungen leider bei weitem nicht die einzigen ihrer Art sind. So ist beispielsweise weniger bekannt, dass sich ein erheblicher Anteil dieser Attacken nicht gegen antike, vorislamische Kulturgüter richtet, sondern dass ihnen im Gegenteil v.a. islamisches Kulturgut zum Opfer fällt.
Doch die Zerstörung durch religiöse Extremisten ist gemäß Herrn Pruß leider nicht die einzige Gefahr für die Kulturgüter des Vorderen Orients. Schon bei den ersten Ausgrabungen durch Europäer, die der Methoden der modernen Archäologie entbehrten, wurde mitunter ein erheblicher Schaden angerichtet. Auch heutzutage stellen illegale Raubgrabungen, gerade im Zuge der andauernden Konflikte, ein erhebliches Problem dar und hinterlassen der Forschung einen irreparablen Schaden. Nicht zuletzt kommt es im Rahmen der Kriegshandlungen auch zu unbeabsichtigten Zerstörungen. Als Beispiel führte Herr Pruß Aleppo auf, wo im Zuge der Kampfhandlungen beispielsweise der antike Tempel des Wettergottes sowie die berühmte Freitagsmoschee zerstört wurden.
 
Herr Pruß beendete seine Antrittsvorlesung jedoch mit einem Lichtblick, indem er darauf hinwies, dass es durchaus lokale Bemühungen gibt, in Mitleidenschaft gezogene Kulturgüter wieder zu restaurieren. Er folgerte daraus, dass es im Sinne des Kulturgüterschutzes zu unserer Aufgabe gehört, solche Projekte zu fördern.

Antrittsvorlesung von Prof. Dr. Alexander Pruß – Bildersturm: Ausmaß und Hintergrund von Kulturzerstörung im Nahen Osten

Ein Beitrag von Tim Brandes.
 
Im Sommersemester 2015 nahm Prof. Dr. Alexander Pruß den Ruf der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz an und ist seitdem Inhaber des Lehrstuhls für Vorderasiatische Archäologie in Mainz. Schon von Beginn an durfte ihn auch das Graduiertenkolleg „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ willkommen heißen, in dem er sogleich zum Mitglied des Trägerkreises wurde und seitdem maßgeblich zur Erweiterung des Themen- und Forschungsspektrums beigetragen hat.
 
Am 24.11.2016 hielt Herr Pruß nun seine Antrittsvorlesung an der Universität Mainz. Das Thema dieser Vorlesung weist zwar keine direkte Anlehnung an die Forschung des Graduiertenkollegs auf, soll an dieser Stelle aber dennoch Erwähnung finden, da es grundsätzlich alle Altertumswissenschaften berührt und im besonderen Maße natürlich diejenigen, die sich mit dem Alten Orient im weitesten Sinne beschäftigen.
In eben jener Vorlesung mit dem Titel „Bildersturm: Ausmaß und Hintergrund von Kulturzerstörung im Nahen Osten“ widmete sich Herr Pruß einem Thema, das vor dem Hintergrund der andauernden bewaffneten Konflikte  sowohl in Syrien als auch im Irak  eine leider allzu aktuelle Brisanz besitzt.
 

Medienwirksame Zerstörung antiker Stätten: Nimrud und Palmyra

Den Verlust für die Forschung machte Herr Pruß eingangs am Beispiel Nimruds fest, einer der Hauptstädte des neuassyrischen Reiches, das bis zum Ende des siebten Jahrhunderts v. Chr. die dominierende politische Macht des Vorderen Orients darstellte. Aus eben jener neuassyrischen Epoche sind unzählige schriftliche und bildliche Zeugnisse überliefert, die sich als unschätzbar wertvoll für die Erforschung des Alten Orients erwiesen haben. So stellen die neuassyrischen Reliefs, u.a. aus Nimrud, die wohl umfangreichste zusammengehörige Gruppe von Bildquellen aus dem Alten Orient insgesamt dar.
Gerade diese antike Ruinenstätte Nimrud hat in jüngster Zeit für traurige Schlagzeilen gesorgt, da sie medienwirksam und somit als deutliche Provokation vom sogenannten IS zerstört wurde. Doch Nimrud war bei weitem nicht die einzige kulturell bedeutsame Stätte, die diesem Schicksal anheim fiel: Inzwischen war mehrfach auch die ebenfalls bedeutsame Stadt Palmyra in Syrien das Ziel gezielter Zerstörungen. So wurde 2015 der bis dato gut erhaltene Baal-Tempel ebenfalls vom IS gesprengt.
 

Weitere, weniger bekannte Formen der Kulturzerstörung

Herr Pruß machte weiterhin darauf aufmerksam, dass diese medienwirksamen Zerstörungen leider bei weitem nicht die einzigen ihrer Art sind. So ist beispielsweise weniger bekannt, dass sich ein erheblicher Anteil dieser Attacken nicht gegen antike, vorislamische Kulturgüter richtet, sondern dass ihnen im Gegenteil v.a. islamisches Kulturgut zum Opfer fällt.
Doch die Zerstörung durch religiöse Extremisten ist gemäß Herrn Pruß leider nicht die einzige Gefahr für die Kulturgüter des Vorderen Orients. Schon bei den ersten Ausgrabungen durch Europäer, die der Methoden der modernen Archäologie entbehrten, wurde mitunter ein erheblicher Schaden angerichtet. Auch heutzutage stellen illegale Raubgrabungen, gerade im Zuge der andauernden Konflikte, ein erhebliches Problem dar und hinterlassen der Forschung einen irreparablen Schaden. Nicht zuletzt kommt es im Rahmen der Kriegshandlungen auch zu unbeabsichtigten Zerstörungen. Als Beispiel führte Herr Pruß Aleppo auf, wo im Zuge der Kampfhandlungen beispielsweise der antike Tempel des Wettergottes sowie die berühmte Freitagsmoschee zerstört wurden.
 
Herr Pruß beendete seine Antrittsvorlesung jedoch mit einem Lichtblick, indem er darauf hinwies, dass es durchaus lokale Bemühungen gibt, in Mitleidenschaft gezogene Kulturgüter wieder zu restaurieren. Er folgerte daraus, dass es im Sinne des Kulturgüterschutzes zu unserer Aufgabe gehört, solche Projekte zu fördern.

Vortrag von Prof. Salima Ikram – Animals as Intercessors and Ex Votos: The Case of Animal Mummies in Ancient Egypt

Ein Beitrag von Sonja Speck.
 
Am 17. November 2016 konnte das Graduiertenkolleg Prof. Salima Ikram von der Amerikanischen Universität Kairo als Gastrednerin unserer Ringvorlesung „Kult, Kunst und Konsum – Tiere in alten Kulturen“ zum Thema „Animals as Intercessors and Ex Votos: The Case of Animal Mummies in Ancient Egypt“ begrüßen. Salima Ikram ist die Koryphäe auf dem Gebiet der Tiermumien und dem Phänomen ihrer massenhaften Stiftung in riesigen Katakomben seit der ägyptischen Spätzeit. Aufgrund ihrer herausragenden Expertise in einem der Stammthemen der Ägyptologie, den Mumien, aber auch aufgrund ihrer unerschrockenen und mutigen Art sich diesem Thema von seiner unglamourösen, praktischen Seite zu nähern, ist Salima Ikram als häufig angefragter Gast in Dokumentationen zum Alten Ägypten über die Fachgrenzen hinaus bekannt und geschätzt.
 

Experimentelle Archäologie

Ein zentraler Ansatz von Salima Ikrams Erforschung der Tiermumien ist die Experimentelle Archäologie, d. h. durch Texte und die Mumien selbst überlieferte Mumifizierungstechniken werden an Hasen, Schafen und anderen Tieren ausprobiert und überprüft. Unter anderem stellte Salima Ikram dem Publikum fertiggestellte Hasenmumien, von denen jede einen niedlichen Spitznamen trug, sowie den explodierten Hasen Mopsy vor, der es als Vergleichsprobe nicht bis zur Mumie geschafft hatte. Die Mumifizierung von Tieren läuft genauso ab wie die von Menschen. Ein Unterschied ist, dass bei Tieren das Gehirn meist nicht entfernt wird, da es zu klein ist, um beim Verbleib in der Mumie Schaden anzurichten. Es hat sich im Experiment herausgestellt, dass man für die Arbeit an einer Tiermumie ein ganzes Team von Mumifizierern braucht, insbesondere bei größeren Tieren. Basierend auf archäologischen Funden von Mumifizierungsgeräten und praktischen Experimenten konnte Salima Ikram zudem eine Mumifizierungspraxis nachweisen, die das Auflösen der Innereien durch Zedernöleinläufe und deren anschließende Entfernung über den Anus durch (vorsichtigen!) Druck auf den Körper beinhaltet. Eine andere Technik, die ebenfalls vor allem bei kleineren Tieren angewendet wurde, ist das Eintauchen des ganzen Tieres in eine Mischung aus Öl, Harz und Teer und das anschließende Umwickeln mit Leinenbinden.
 

Bedeutung und Funktion von Tiermumien in Ägypten

Die Mumifizierung in Ägypten diente dazu den Verstorbenen zu vergöttlichen, damit der Ba, eine Art mobiler Teil der Seele, in den Körper zurückkehren und der Verstorbene im Jenseits weiterleben kann. Salima Ikram stellte die Frage in den Raum, ob die Mumifizierung von Tieren darauf schließen lässt, dass man glaubte, dass Tiere ebenso wie die Menschen die ägyptischen Äquivalente einer Seele besaßen. Eindeutig kann diese Frage nicht beantwortet werden, jedoch spricht laut Salima Ikram einiges dafür, dass sie zu bejahen ist.
Darüber hinaus wurden Tiermumien zusätzliche Funktionen zugeteilt, sodass sie in verschiedenen Kontexten vorkommen konnten sowie unterschiedliche Behandlungen erfuhren. Salima Ikram teilt die verschiedenen Arten von Tiermumien folgendermaßen ein:

  1. Haustiere
  2. Nahrung
  3. Heilige Tiere
  4. Votive für bestimmte Götter oder als Geschenke an den königlichen Kult
  5. Andere
Es sind mehrere prominente Fälle bekannt, in denen mumifizierte Haustiere gemeinsam mit den Mumien ihrer Besitzer bestattet wurden. So wurde beispielsweise bei der Gottesgemahlin Maatkare in der Cachette von Deir el-Bahari (DB/TT320) die Mumie eines kleinen Äffchens gefunden. Gräber von einzelnen Tieren existieren auch im Tal der Könige. Man muss davon ausgehen, dass diese Tiere zu Lebzeiten als Haustiere im königlichen Palast gehalten wurden und dem König bzw. der königlichen Familie zuzuordnen sind.
Als wichtigstes Beispiel für die „heiligen Tiere“ ist der Apis-Stier zu nennen, dessen Kult bereits in der 1. Dynastie (frühes 3. Jt. v. Chr.) begann. Nach dem Tod des Apis-Stiers wurde sein Leichnam mumifiziert und in einem riesigen Steinsarkophag in den Serapeum-Katakomben bestattet und an die Stelle des verstorbenen Tiers trat ein neuer Apis-Stier.
 

Tiermumien als Votive

Zahlenmäßig am häufigsten sind Tiermumien, die als Votive in bestimmten Götterkulten gestiftet wurden. Diese Votive wurden in kilometerlangen unterirdischen Galerien z. B. in Tuna el-Gebel und Saqqara abgelegt und aufbewahrt. Unter den Votivtiermumien sind wiederum die Ibisse, die Thot gestiftet wurden, am häufigsten. Die Haltung von Ibissen ist generell einfach, da man sie lediglich füttern muss, um zu gewährleisten, dass sie an Ort und Stelle bleiben. Auch Katzenmumien sind relativ häufig. Im Röntgenbild ist bei den meisten ein gebrochenes Genick zu erkennen. Katzen wurden demnach speziell für ihre Mumifizierung getötet bzw. geopfert und nicht erst nach einem natürlichen Tod mumifiziert.




Abbildung: Ägyptische Tiermumien (Bildquelle: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:British_museum,_Egypt_mummies_of_animals_(4423733728).jpg).

In den Galerien von Abu Rawash wurden Spitzmausmumien in großer Zahl aufbewahrt. Die Spitzmäuse wurden aufgrund ihrer geringen Größe einzeln in Leinen eingewickelt und anschließend zu mehreren in ein Bündel verpackt oder in winzige Einzelsärge gelegt, die z. T. kleine Spitzmausbronzen auf dem Sargdeckel aufweisen. Die Spitzmaus ist die nächtliche Erscheinung des Sonnengottes, weshalb die Spitzmausmumien mit dem Kult des Sonnengottes in Abu Rawash assoziiert sind.

Saqqara hingegen ist mit Anubis assoziiert. Aufgrund der schakal- und hundeartigen Gestalt des Gottes wurden in Saqqara vor allem Hundemumien gestiftet. In den Katakomben von Saqqara wurden insgesamt 7,8 Millionen von ihnen gefunden, die meisten Tiere waren zum Zeitpunkt ihrer Mumifizierung noch im Welpenalter. Die große Zahl der Hundemumien spricht dafür, dass in der memphitischen Region rund um Saqqara große Hundefarmen allein für den lokalen Kult Welpen produzierten. Die gigantische Menge an Tiermumien allein belegt, welch großes Geschäft mit dem Glauben der Menschen und ihrem Wunsch Votive zu opfern gemacht wurde. Dazu gehörten ebenso wie die Herstellung und der Verkauf der Tiermumien der Bau der Galerien an sich, deren Unterhalt, die Dienste der Priester, die Züchtung der Tiere, die Versorgung der Pilger etc. Man war offenbar gewillt große ökonomische Anstrengungen auf sich zu nehmen, um an den Kulten rund um die Tiermumien teilzunehmen.

 

Tiere und Natur in der Altägyptischen Kultur

Die Tiermumien sind nur ein Beispiel für die zentrale Rolle, die Tiere im Glauben der Alten Ägypter einnahmen. Ein tieferes Verständnis dieser Rolle erfordert laut Salima Ikram nicht nur die Auseinandersetzung mit den kulturellen Hinterlassenschaften des pharaonischen Ägyptens, sondern auch die Beobachtung der Natur. Daher bezeichnet sich Salima Ikram selbst als Anhängerin des Naturdeterminismus. Die Maxime lautet „Nature is a key to culture“. Die natürliche Umgebung, die die Menschen in Ägypten vorfanden, bedeutete zugleich Rohstoffgrundlage und Inspiration in Schrift, Architektur und Ikonographie. Auch in Religion und Gesellschaft fanden Tierbeobachtungen Eingang als Metaphern für abstrakte Vorstellungen.
 

Diskussion

In der anschließenden Diskussion kamen verschiedene Tiere, die im Vortrag nicht vorkamen, zur Sprache, darunter die Schweine, von denen bisher keine Mumien gefunden wurden. Eine mögliche Erklärung ist ihre Assoziation mit dem Götterfeind Seth. Ein weiteres mit ihm assoziiertes Tier, der Esel, wurde ebenfalls nicht mumifiziert. Fische und insbesondere Welse können als Mumien in Ritualdeponierungen vorkommen. Allerdings ist unklar, mit welcher Gottheit sie assoziiert wurden. Siedlungsfunde belegen außerdem, dass Welse auch Speisefische waren. Auf die Frage, ob größere Tiere abgesehen von Stieren mumifiziert wurden, nannte Salima Ikram die Pferdemumie, die im Grab des Senenmut, eines der einflussreichsten Beamten unter der Königin Hatschepsut, mit einem Satteltuch in einem Holzsarg bestattet wurde. Das Tier war zum Zeitpunkt seines Todes bereits älter und war wahrscheinlich das geschätzte, persönliche Reittier des Grabherrn. In der Regel wurden bestimmten Göttern jene Tiere als Mumien gestiftet, in deren Gestalt sie gezeigt werden konnten. In diesem Zusammenhang stellt sich die Frage, welche Tiermumien dem hybriden Wesen Anubis geopfert wurden. Diese waren vor allem Tiere, die der Gestalt Anubis irgendwie ähnelten, v. a. Hunde, aber auch Schakale, einige Füchse und Hyänen.

Vor dem Tabu. Der Umgang mit Schweinen im Alten Orient

Ein Beitrag von Tim Brandes. 
Im Wintersemester 2016/17 veranstaltet das Graduiertenkolleg 1876 die im Rahmen seines Bestehens nunmehr zweite Ringvorlesung mit dem Titel „Kult, Kunst und Konsum – Tiere in alten Kulturen“. Den Auftakt zu dieser Ringvorlesung gab Prof. Alexander Pruß (Vorderasiatische Archäologie, Mainz). 

Schweine im Alten Orient: ein Tabu?

Allgemein bekannt sind die Speisetabus von Schweinefleisch sowohl im Judentum als auch im Islam. Doch wie nutzten die Menschen des antiken Orients das Schwein und welche Vorstellungen verbanden sie damit? Diesen Fragen widmete sich Prof. Pruß im Rahmen seines Vortrags „Vor dem Tabu. Der Umgang mit Schweinen im Alten Orient“. 
Als Ausgangspunkt des Vortrags diente eine archäozoologische Untersuchung: Anhand von Tierknochenfunden zeigte Prof. Pruß zunächst die Verbreitung von Schweinen im Alten Orient über einen Zeitraum vom späten vierten bis ins erste Jahrtausend v. Chr. So konnte die Anwesenheit und Nutzung von Schweinen bspw. in der zweiten Hälfte des dritten Jahrtausends v. Chr. bereits für den gesamten vorderen Orient nachgewiesen werden. Auch wenn die Anwesenheit von Knochenfunden im Laufe der Zeit Schwankungen unterlag, konnte bereits an dieser Stelle des Vortrags festgehalten werden, dass Schweine im Alten Orient keineswegs gemieden wurden. 

Schweine in bildlichen und schriftlichen Quellen 

Doch wie spiegelt sich dieser Befund in den übrigen archäologischen und philologischen Quellen?
Schon früh finden sich Gefäße in der Form von Schweinen. Auch die ersten Schriftquellen geben bereits Hinweise auf deren Haltung. So beinhaltet bspw. ein früher Text eine Auflistung von Schweinen und Schweineprodukten. Ein Archiv der Stadt Girsu aus dem 24. Jahrhundert v. Chr. wiederum enthält mehrfach Belege für Schweinezucht. Die Texte geben zudem einen interessanten Einblick in die antike Art der Kategorisierung – eine Thematik, die in der Forschung des Graduiertenkollegs von großer Bedeutung ist: So wurde im Alten Orient unterschieden zwischen „Rohrschweinen“ und „Grasschweinen“, wobei die Lebensumstände des Tieres offenkundig der Kategorisierung dienten. Die „Grasschweine“ stellen dabei die stärker domestizierte Variante dar, während die „Rohrschweine“, wie der Name es schon vermuten lässt, eher in den von Schilfrohr geprägten Flusslandschaften außerhalb der Siedlungen anzutreffen waren. Die antike Kategorisierung ist dabei aber nur ansatzweise mit der modernen Einteilung in Wild- und Hausschwein vergleichbar. 
Die schriftlich vorgenommene Kategorisierung lässt sich dann auch anhand von bildlichen Darstellungen nachvollziehen. So ist die Jagd auf Schweine bereits ein Uruk-zeitliches Motiv auf Rollsiegeln, das sich auch noch spät im ersten Jahrtausend v. Chr. auf Rollsiegeln aus der achaemenidischen Zeit wiederfindet. Auch Inschriften und Reliefs des assyrischen Königs Sanherib beschreiben bzw. zeigen eine Schilflandschaft, die der König anlegen ließ und in der auch Schweine angesiedelt wurden. 

Jenseits der Wirtschaft: das gesellschaftliche Ansehen des Schweins

Die Quellen zeigen also, dass Schweine sowohl gehalten als auch gejagt wurden und somit einen, wenn auch regional und zeitlich unterschiedlich stark ausgeprägten, Wirtschaftsfaktor darstellten. Wie war, in Anlehnung an die eingangs erwähnten Speisetabus, nun aber die gesellschaftliche Bedeutung des Schweins im Alten Orient? Dieser Frage ging Prof. Pruß im weiteren Verlauf des Vortrags nach. 
Für den Alten Orient zeichnen verschiedene Quellen ein differenziertes Bild. So war Schweinefleisch in altbabylonischer Zeit unter den Abgaben an den König zu finden und wurde auch im Rahmen von offiziellen „Staatsbanketten“ dargereicht. Es galt zu der Zeit also offenbar nicht als allzu minderwertige Nahrung. 
Auf der anderen Seite weisen Sprichwörter aus späterer Zeit darauf hin, dass Schweinen offenbar doch auch ein negativer Ruf anhaftete. So galten sie u.a. aufgrund ihrer Nahrungsgewohnheiten als besonders unreinliche Tiere. Sogar den Göttern seien sie ein Greul gewesen. Tatsächlich ist Schweinefleisch in Mesopotamien kaum als Speiseopfer für die Götter belegt und galt im sakralen Kontext sogar als Frevel. 
Auch der Befund der hethitischen Texte zeichnet ein ähnliches Bild: So ist bspw. ein Reinigungsritual gegen die Unreinheit, die durch den unbeabsichtigten Kontakt mit Schweinen zustande kam, belegt. 

Fazit 

Letztendlich lässt sich also festhalten, dass Schweine im Alten Orient, mit zeitlichen und geographischen Unterschieden, gehalten wurden und somit einen nicht unbedeutenden Wirtschaftszweig repräsentierten. Trotzdem genoss das Schwein, zumindest in späteren Quellen, keinen besonders guten Ruf und war in sakralen Kontexten tatsächlich tabuisiert. Dennoch kann aus den oben genannten Gründen keineswegs von einem strikten Tabu gesprochen werden. Wann und warum sich dieses generelle Speisetabu entwickelt hat, bleibt also weiterhin unklar.

Workshop mit Prof. Dr. Marianne Bechhaus-Gerst zum Thema „Postkoloniale Theorien in ‚vormodernen‘ Gesellschaften – Begegnungen, Konzepte, Prozesse“

 Ein Beitrag von Dominic Bärsch.

Am 10.11.2016 veranstaltete Marianne Bechhaus-Gerst als Gastwissenschaftlerin des Graduiertenkollegs einen Workshop zum Thema „Postkoloniale Theorien in ‚vormodernen‘ Gesellschaften – Begegnungen, Konzepte, Prozesse“, an dem die Mehrzahl der Graduierten teilnahm.
 
Im Rahmen dieses Workshops stellte Frau Bechhaus-Gerst zunächst ausgewählte Theorien aus dem Bereich der sogenannten Postcolonial Studies vor, die sich mit der Analyse von Kulturkontakten und Machtstrukturen beschäftigen, vor allem aber auch die Dekonstruktion von Essentialismen und binären Oppositionen des kolonialen Diskurses zum Gegenstand haben. In der Diskussion dieser Theorien wurde daraufhin immer die Frage aufgeworfen, wie diese Ansätze für die von den Graduierten untersuchten Kulturen nutzbar gemacht werden können.
 
In diesem Zusammenhang zeigte sich, dass vor allem die Überlegungen des indischen Theoretikers Homi Bhabha für die Arbeit mit vormodernen Konzepten anwendbar sind. Dieser beschäftigt sich unter anderem mit der Frage von Hybridisierungen, die zwangsläufig beim interkulturellen Kontakt entstehen. Beispiele solcher Hybridisierungsprozesse finden sich auch in den Arbeiten der Doktorandinnen und Doktoranden, die anschließend einige solcher Fälle diskutierten. In den Worten Bhabhas sind „all forms of culture (…) continually in a process of hybridity“ (Fn. 1), womit gemeint ist, dass nicht nur bei Kontakten zwischen Kulturen, sondern auch zwischen einzelnen Subjekten stets Hybride auftreten, die kulturelle Zusammenhänge, Ideen und Konzepte ändern können. Vor diesem Hintergrund machte Frau Bechhaus-Gerst auf García Canclinis aufmerksam, der Hybridität als die Fähigkeit einer Kultur definiert, Ideen aus früheren Zusammenhängen oder aus einer anderen Kultur aufzunehmen, um sie dann in abgewandelter Form in einen neuen Kontext einzufügen, wodurch sich auch der Kontext ändert, in den diese Ideen eingefügt werden.
 
Im Anschluss stellte Frau Bechhaus-Gerst noch einige Beispiele aus ihrer eigenen Forschung vor, die einen praktischen Einblick in die Übertragbarkeit der postkolonialen Theorien in vormoderne Forschungsgegenstände illustrierten. Eine Abschlussdiskussion rundete den thematischen Block ab und entließ die Doktoranden mit wertvollen Anregungen für ihre eigenen Arbeiten.
 
Fußnote: 
(1) Homi K. Bhabha, Nation and Narration, New York 1990, 211.

Internationale Konferenz: „Finding, Inheriting or Borrowing? Construction and Transfer of Knowledge about Man and Nature in Antiquity and the Middle Ages“

Ein Beitrag von Dominik Berrens, Nadine Gräßler und Katharina Hillenbrand.

Am 14. September war es soweit: Die erste internationale Tagung des GRKS startete in den Räumlichkeiten des Institute Français (Abb. 1) und setzte sich am 15. und 16. September im Erbacher Hof fort (Abb. 2). Unter dem Titel „Finding, Inheriting or Borrowing? Construction and Transfer of Knowledge about Man and Nature in Antiquity and the Middle Ages“ (Link zum Programm) wurden Mechanismen, die bei der Entstehung und Rechtfertigung von Wissen in den vormodernen Kulturen greifen, vorgestellt, theoretisiert und einem transdisziplinären Vergleich zugänglich gemacht. Die verschiedenen Aspekte von Wissensentstehung wurden hierfür zunächst in einem methodologischen Panel sichtbar gemacht (Panel A) und anschließend anhand konkreter Beispiele aus Dissertationsprojekten des GRKs im Vergleich mit ähnlichen Konzepten anderer Disziplinen hinsichtlich der Frage nach der Universalität, Spezifität und Tradierung von Wissensbestandteilen beleuchtet (Panels B-D).

Beginn von Panel A am 14.09. (Foto: Idan Breier).

Panel A: „Methodological and Theoretical Aspects“

Theoretische Annäherungen an das Thema erfolgten durch Beitragende aus der Ägyptologie (Susanne Beck, Tübingen: „Transfer of Knowledge: From Mesopotamia to Egypt“), der Theologie (Jeffrey L. Cooley, Boston: „Epistemology in the Biblical Tradition: Judean Knowledge-Building, Scribal Craftsmanship, and Scribal Culture“) und der Judaistik (Lennart Lehmhaus, Berlin: „Talmudic Bodies and Nature – Constructing and Authorizing Knowledge in Late Antique Jewish Tradition“), die alle Beispiele aufzeigten, in denen auf verschiedenste Weise fremdes Wissen oder fremde Praktiken inkorporiert und unterschiedlich legitimiert wurden. Anhand der Beispiele wurden Formen des Wissenstransfers erkennbar, ohne dass bereits Fragen der Spezifität oder Tradierung adressiert werden mussten.

Panel B: „Of Man and Moon. Knowledge and Cultural Meaning of the Moon“

Das erste „thematische“ Panel beleuchtete Konzepte vom Mond, die besonders im Dissertationsprojekt von Victoria Altmann-Wendling bearbeitet werden, aber auch im Projekt von Tim Brandes eine Rolle spielen. Beide trugen dementsprechend Überlegungen zu ihrer Thematik vor (Tim Brandes: „‚He Assigned Him as the Jewel of the Night‘ – The Knowledge of the Moon in Mesopotamian Texts of the Late 2nd and 1st Millennium BC“ und Victoria Altmann-Wendling: „Shapeshifter – Knowledge of the Moon in Graeco-Roman Egypt“) und fokussierten Formen des Wissens über lunare Phänomene und mögliche Tradierungswege zwischen den Kulturen. Die Überlegungen wurden durch Beiträge aus der Klassischen Philologie (Liba Taub, Cambridge: „Plutarch’s Concept of the Moon in his ‚De facie in orbe lunae‘ against the Background of his Predecessors“), der Numismatik (José Miguel Puebla Morón, Madrid: „Iconography of the Moon in the Coinage of Greek Sicily“), der keltischen Archäologie (Allard Mees, RGZM Mainz: „Early Celtic Time Cycles: Adaption and Creation“) und der Byzantinistik (Alberto Bardi, München: „Reception and Rejection of Foreign Astronomical Knowledge in Byzantium“) bereichert. Alle Vorträge gaben wichtige Einblicke in die Bedeutung des Mondes und das (transferierte) Wissen über ihn in anderen kulturellen Kontexten. Im Anschluss wurden besonders praktische Fragen des Wissenstransfers diskutiert, etwa die zusätzliche Bedeutung nicht-schriftlicher Traditionen und entsandter Experten, aber auch Fragen der Wissenslegitimierung.

Panel B am 15.09. (Foto: Idan Breier).

Keynote Lecture: „Transmitting Symbolic Concepts from the Perspective of Cultural Cognition: the Acquisition and Transfer of Folk-Biological Knowledge“

Panel B wurde ergänzt und abgerundet von Roy Ellens (Kent, Anthropologie) Keynote Lecture, die sich auf theoretischer Ebene mit der Frage nach unterschiedlichen Arten der Wissenstradierung, beispielsweise solcher zwischen Generationen oder verschiedenen Gruppen, auseinandersetzte und auf verschiedene Erklärungsmuster einging, die im späteren Verlauf der Konferenz als theoretischer Referenzrahmen immer wieder herangezogen wurden.

Panel C: „The End of the World in Fire – Imaginations from Antiquity to the Middle Ages“

In Panel C wurden Konzepte des Weltendes in Feuer thematisiert, ein Teilaspekt des Dissertationsprojektes von Dominic Bärsch, der mit seinem Vortrag „Poets, Prophets and Philosophers – Otto von Freising’s End of the World“ einen Ausblick in mittelalterliche Autorisierungsstrategien des Weltendes gab. Ziel war es, durch transdisziplinäre Vergleiche mögliche Antworten auf Spezifität und Universalität der Konzepte seiner Untersuchung zu finden. Zu diesem Zweck zeigten der Iranist Götz König (Berlin: „The Idea of an Apocalyptic Fire According to the Middle Iranian Sources and the Question of an Old Iranian Heritage“), der Klassische Philologe Knut Usener (Wuppertal: „Burning for a Fresh Start“) und der nordische Religionswissenschaftler Jens Peter Schjødt (Aarhus: „Some Reflections on the Ragnarok Myth in Scandinavia“) unterschiedliche kulturelle Vorstellungen eines Weltfeuers auf, die bemerkenswerte Schnittmengen aufwiesen. Die Abschlussdiskussion kreiste dementsprechend um die Frage, inwieweit in den Einzelfällen von Spezifität oder bereits von Universalität zu sprechen sei. Dabei wurde der stets bedeutsame individuelle Kontext betont, der einer jeden, das Wissen annehmenden Kultur beigemessen werden muss.

Panel D: „Pejorative Description and Distinction Based on Human Perceptions of Animals“

Der letzte Tag widmete sich ganz der Frage nach dem Wissen über Tiere, die auf negative Weise zur Charakterisierung von Menschen eingesetzt werden. Das Panel bezog dabei Aspekte mehrerer Dissertationsprojekte des GRKs mit ein. Vortragende des GRKs waren Tristan Schmidt (Byzantinistik: „Beasts of Prey as Means of Exclusion and Vilification of Social Groups in the Byzantine Political Discourse“) und Imke Fleuren (Ägyptologie: „Animal Imagery as a Means to Describe ‚The Other‘ in Ancient Egypt“), die beide Aspekte ihrer Arbeiten vorstellten und insbesondere die Bedeutung andersartiger Gruppen in der jeweiligen Kultur und des jeweils mit diesen verbundenen Tieres eruierten.
Das Panel wurde durch Beiträge aus der Klassischen Philologie (Cristiana Franco, Siena: „According to the Rung. Towards an Intersectional Analysis of Animal Representations“ sowie Fabio Tutrone, Pisa: „‚Some of you are dogs who can both bark and bite‘ (Pro. Rosc. Amer. 57): Cicero, Lucretius, and the Ambiguities of Roman Dogness“), der jüdischen Studien (Idan Breier, Tel Aviv: „Shaming by Naming: ‚Dog‘ as a Derogatory Term for Human Beings in Ancient Near Eastern Sources“), der Klassischen Archäologie (Sandra Kyewski, Basel: „Monkey Business. The Defamation of Men through Animal-Like Faces“) und der Altorientalistik (Seth F. C. Richardson, Chicago: „Nature Engaged and Disengaged. The Case of Mesopotamian Literatures“) ergänzt. Auffällig war besonders, dass der Hund in fast allen Kulturen zur Herabsetzung des Anderen diente, durchaus aber auch positive Eigenschaften verkörpern konnte. In der Diskussion wurde dies als ein Hinweis auf eine universell ähnliche Wahrnehmung des am frühesten domestizierten Haustieres gedeutet, Tradierungen und Übernahmen von Konzepten seien aber ebenso denkbar.
Die Abschlussdiskussion der internationalen Tagung hob die Beobachtungen der vergangenen Tage auf ein abstrakteres Niveau und beleuchtete insbesondere die Vorträge vor dem Hintergrund der in der Keynote Lecture Roy Ellens vorgestellten theoretischen Modelle. 

23rd International Congress of Byzantine Studies, 22. bis 27.8.2016

Ein Beitrag von Tristan Schmidt.

Vom 22. bis zum 27. August 2017 fand in Belgrad der „23rd International Congress of Byzantine Studies“ statt. Unter dem Motto „Byzantium – a world of changes“ trafen sich Byzantinisten aus aller Welt, um in Vorlesungen, Round Tables und Präsentationsveranstaltungen aktuelle Themen der Forschung zu Geschichte und Kultur des Byzantinischen Reiches zu diskutieren. Veranstaltungsort des alle fünf Jahre stattfindenden Kongresses war dieses Mal die serbische Hauptstadt Belgrad, deren Universität und Akademie der Wissenschaften die Räumlichkeiten stellten. Das Vortragsprogramm wurde von zahlreichen Exkursionsangeboten begleitet, die den Besuch historischer Stätten und von Ausgrabungen zur byzantinischen und mittelalterlichen serbischen Geschichte ermöglichten.
 
Das Programm bestand aus mehreren parallel stattfindenden Sektionen, die historische, philologische, kunstgeschichtliche und archäologische Themen abdeckten. Als Mitglied des Graduiertenkollegs 1876 „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ beteiligte ich mich an einer Sektion zu Zivilrecht und kanonischem Recht in Byzanz und dem mittelalterlichen Serbien. Mein Vortrag mit dem Titel „Criticism of Venationes and Ecclesiastical Attitudes towards Hunting in the 12th Century Byzantium“ beschäftigte sich mit zwei byzantinischen Kanonisten des zwölften Jahrhunderts, die in ihren Kommentaren zu den Bestimmungen der sog. Trullanischen Synode von 691/2 das Thema der öffentlichen Tierkämpfe diskutierten. Der Vortrag ging der Frage nach, inwieweit derartige Jagdspektakel im Konstantinopel des zwölften Jahrhunderts überhaupt noch stattfanden, welchen Stellenwert sie besaßen, und welchen Beitrag die beiden Kommentare zur Beantwortung dieser noch nicht restlos geklärten Frage beitragen können. Darüber hinaus kann man aus den beiden Texten weitere Informationen über die Einstellung kirchlicher Vertreter gegenüber anderen Arten der Jagd herauslesen. So war diese allein aus Gründen der Nahrungsbeschaffung durchaus als rechtschaffenes Werk angesehen. Die Einstellung der Kanonisten zur aristokratischen Jagd als Sport lässt sich weniger gut greifen. Allerdings zeigen andere Quellen aus dem Bereich der Hofrhetorik, dass sowohl weltliche als auch geistliche Autoren das Thema in ausnehmend positiver Weise schildern.

Die anschließende Diskussion sowie weiter Gesprächsmöglichkeiten während der Tagung brachten weitere Anregungen, sowohl für den aktuellen Vortrag, als auch für das Dissertationsprojekt.

The 16th Conference of the International Qajar Studies Association: Doctors and the Medicinal Arts in Qajar Iran, Vienna, Austria, August 2016

Ein Beitrag von Shahrzad Irannejad.
 
On the 8th and 9th August 2016, the conference „Doctors and the Medicinal Arts in Qajar Iran“ was held at the Theatersaal of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna.
 
Florence Hellot-Bellier (CNRS, Paris) sharing insights about the photographic collections of French doctors Tholozan and Feuvrier from Qajar Iran at the Theatersaal of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Photo: Shahrzad Irannejad).

The Qajar era in Iran is very important for the study of humoral medicine as a medical paradigm. This era marks the transfer of knowledge from West to East and borrowing of new concepts, like that of contagion and chemotherapy, which resulted in the almost total abandonment of humoral paradigm as an epistemological tool. This conference was an opportunity for me to present part of my parallel research interest, namely the give and take between medical concepts and their sociocultural context (here, the culinary arts as an example) and receive feedback from the likes of Prof. Houchang E. Chehabi and Prof. Bert Fragner, two leading experts on the cultural history of Iran. 
 
In the first panel Encounters between Traditional and Modern Medicine in Qajar Iran, Reihaneh Nazem and Touba Fazelipour (Independent Scholars, Tehran) shared the results of their research on three major newspapers in Qajar era: Vaqaye‘-e Ettefaqiyeh (RVE), Shekufeh, Alam-e Nesvan. Their paper entitled „The Encounter between Modern and Traditional Medicine in the Newspapers of the Qajar Era“ provided us with an interesting methodological approach to reconstructing social history of medicine. The focus of their research was reconstructing the views on women’s health in Qajar era. Afterwards, Dariush Rahmanian’s article (Tehran University) was read entitled „Translated Medical Texts of Dar al-Fonun as the Connecting Link between Traditional and Modern Medical Knowledge: An Examination of the Hefz al-Sehheh-ye Naseri.“ He stressed that many of the medical manuscripts from this time remain unedited and unanalyzed, while these texts can provide us with invaluable material attesting to the struggles between the two medical paradigms: humoral and modern. Rahmanian’s research focused on as transitional text from one medical paradigm to the other. To wrap up the panel, Khosro Khonsari (Research Institute of Cultural Heritage and Tourism, Iran) presented his paper „An Overview of the State of Pharmacy in the Qajar Era: From ‘Attaris to Pharmacies“.
 
The second panel dealt with Western Accounts of the State of Medicine and Public Health in Qajar Iran. Mehdi Alijani’s paper, „Medical Examinations and Methods of the Practice of Medicine in the Qajar Period According to the Accounts of European Visitors“, was read by the chair, Nahid Mozaffarian. In the article, Dr. Alijani (Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran) recounted the observations of several European visitors from the three different periods in Qajar era with regard to the manner of calling on patients, diagnostics and therapeutics: the various methods of phlebotomy and cupping, leech therapy, surgery, use of medicinal plants, enema, hot wax and caustic treatments and exercise therapy (in power houses). Afterwards, Elena Andreeva (Virginia Military Institute, USA) presented her paper „Doctors and the Medicinal Arts in Qajar Iran According to Russian Travelers“, in which she analyzed the attitude of several Russian travelers towards the general hygienic practices of the people and the services provided by various healthcare professions. 
 
Prof. Bert Fragner (Institute of Iranian Studies, Austrian Academy of Sciences) opened the third panel Food and Medicine in Qajar Iran. In his paper „Nader Mirza Molk-Ara (1827-1888) and his Pharmacological Perception of Iranian Food and Dishes“, Prof. Fragner presented a cookbook written by a not so prominent Qajar prince. Prof. Fragner discussed the role of canons of recipes as chapters of collective memory and their role in constructing the notion of „national cuisine“. In the end, however, he demonstrated that his studied culinary text, surprisingly, did not show any awareness of medical considerations. This was very convenient for my presentation, as I aimed to show how in Qajar cookbooks no genuine awareness of humoral theory is evident. In this panel, I presented part of my ongoing side project in a paper entitled „Cuisine as a Mirror for the State of Medicine in Qajar Iran“, on behalf of my colleague Kiarash Alimi as well, who is an enthusiast of the history of culinary arts with a focus on French and Persian cuisine. We showed how in Qajar era, the disintegration of foundation of tradition reflects itself in the way two manifestations of culture, namely the medical and the culinary arts, interacted with one another. Former culinary common sense was shaped by the medical properties attributed to each ingredient. As new ingredients were being introduced, Qajar Iran proves incapable of adjusting Persian recipes according to humoral medical paradigm. To demonstrate, we presented a comparison of the medical and culinary attitudes towards two „Newcomers“ to the Persian spread: Rice in Safavid era and potato in Qajar. I was thrilled to receive much positive feedback and very interesting insights for the next stages of my side project. 
 
The second day of the conference also included an excursion to the Haus-, Hof- und Staatsarchiv des Österreichischen Staatsarchivs in Vienna, in which we were shown documents related to the diplomatic relations between Safavid and Qajar states in Iran and the Hapsburg monarchy.



The Austrian physician Jakub Edward Polak was the first teacher of „Western“ medicine in Iran, and thus the first person to theoretically introduce modern medicine to the country. He worked in Iran for ten years, became personal physician to the king Naser al-Din Shah Qajar, went back home to write one of the most important sources on the social history of Qajar Iran: Persien: Das Land und seine Bewohner. FA Brockhaus, Leipzig, 1865. In the picture you see a first print, on temporary display at the Haus-, Hof- und Staatsarchiv des Österreichischen Staatsarchivs in Vienna (Photo: Shahrzad Irannejad). 

Curiously, an artwork inspired by the concept of the four primordial elements was waiting for us right outside the State Archive. The piece titled „Erde, Wasser, Feuer und Luft“, by Helmut Margreiter (1994) stands in Minoritenplatz in Vienna (Photo: Shahrzad Irannejad).

 

 
In the fourth panel Western Physicians in Qajar Iran, Miklós Sárközy (Institute of Ismaili Studies, London) presented his paper „Bosphorus to Herat: István Maróthy, an ‘Unknown’ Hungarian Doctor and Chief Court Physician of Mohammad Shah Qajar.“ His presentation provided us with a detailed reconstruction of the life of a Persophile Hungarian doctor who was in the service of Qajar noblemen and princes. In her article entitled „About Prostitution and Syphilis in 19th century Iran: Inquiring into J. E. Polak’s Report of 1861“, Heidi Walcher (Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich) attempted to contextualize the 1861 article by the Jewish Austrian personal physician to the king of Iran. She began by a brief introduction to the pioneer of western medicine in Iran and went on to analyze the structure and content of his essay on syphilis. Afterwards, Jennifer Scarce (University of Dundee, UK) presented her article „The Doctors of the Persian Telegraph Department.“ She demonstrated how telegraph was a major need of the British to maintain contact with India, and therefore, to ensure the functioning of the British individuals hired by the telegraph, British doctors had to be recruited. 
 
On the second day, in the fifth panel Medicine and Modernity in Qajar Iran, Eden Naby (Harvard University) talked about „American Missionaries and The Urumiah Medical School.“ In her talk, she presented how American missionaries in northwestern Iran opened the doors for Assyrians of Urmia. She then went on to talk about the trajectories of several Assyrian physicians and discuss their social roles and social standing. Lydia Wytenbroek (York University, UK) shared with us a part of her PhD thesis with an article entitled „The Rise of the Surgical Mission: The Impact of the First World War on American Presbyterian Medical Work in Iran.“ She discussed how in the beginning, the doctors accompanying missions to Iran were only responsible for maintaining the health of the members of the mission, and how they later realized physicians can have access to the local people in a way no ambassador could have. After physicians of the mission realized how even small simple surgeries had catastrophic consequences for their patients, the first American hospital was built in Iran in 1882. 
 
The keynote address was delivered by Nile Green (UCLA) with his fascinating talk „When Hajji Baba Met Frankenstein: The Early Qajar Encounter with British Science.“ In the talk, Nile Green presented the story of the first ever Muslim students to study medicine in the UK and discussed their scientific, cultural and religious responses to British sciences. He painted in vivid colors the social setting of the sciences these Iranian students were exposed to. The keynote speech demonstrated how concepts, instruments and technologies were adopted by the Iranian visitors and taken back home. 
 
The sixth panel The Tholozan Photographic Collection was a collaborative panel consisting of presentations by Elahe Helbig (University of Geneva): „Rural Landscape Photography in Qajar Iran: A Discussion of the Tholozan Collection at the Middle Eastern Archive in Oxford“, Alireza Nabipour (Independent Scholar, Tehran) (presented by Reza Sheikh): „The Comparison of the Tholozan Photo Albums with Two Historical Archives of Iranian Photography“, Florence Hellot-Bellier (CNRS, Paris): „Art and Photography in the Collections of Dr. Tholozan and Dr. Feuvrier.“ Together they presented the various aspects of the photographs collected by a French physician who accompanied Nasir al-Din Shah on a daily basis for several years.
 

 

SCRIPTO Summer School St. Gallen – Schriftkultur des Mittelalters (5. bis 15. Jh.), 4. bis 9. Juli 2016

Ein Beitrag von Stephanie Mühlenfeld.

Vom 4. bis 9. Juli 2016 fand in der Stiftsbibliothek St. Gallen die SCRIPTO Summer School St. Gallen (SSSS) – Schriftkultur des Mittelalters (5. bis 15. Jh.) statt, an der 10 DoktorandInnen aus unterschiedlichen Disziplinen der Mittelalterforschung teilnahmen. Die Summer School, die vom Lehrstuhl für Lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit an der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (PROF. DR. MICHELE C. FERRARI) und der Stiftsbibliothek St. Gallen (DR. CORNEL DORA, FRANZISKA SCHNOOR, PHILIPP LENZ) gemeinsam veranstaltet wurde, findet alle zwei Jahre statt. Ziel der Veranstaltung ist es, den Teilnehmern einen Einblick „in die Geschichte, die Formen und den kulturellen Wert der abendländischen Schrift vom 5. bis zum 15. Jahrhundert“ zu gewähren (Fn. 1). Dabei werden die unterschiedlichen Schriftepochen anhand der kostbaren Handschriften der Stiftsbibliothek erläutert und ein jeder Teilnehmer erhält die Möglichkeit, im Rahmen von praktischen Übungen sein ‚paläographisches Auge‘ (ital. occhio paleografico) zu schulen.
 
Neben den spannenden paläographischen Übungen, einem Gastvortrag PROF. DR. MARILENA MANIACIS (Università degli Studi Cassino Cassino) und einer Einführung in die mittelalterlichen Buchbindetechniken hatten die TeilnehmerInnen auch stets die Möglichkeit, die imposante barocke Stiftsbibliothek – die zu den schönsten Bibliotheken der Welt zählt – und den faszinierenden Veranstaltungsort St. Gallen genauer kennenzulernen (Abb. 1 und 2). 




Abb. 1: Stifskirche St. Gallen (Foto: Stephanie Mühlenfeld).




Abb. 2: Barocksaal der Stiftsbibliothek St. Gallen (Foto: Jochen Vennebusch).

Handschriften hautnah – Vom Vergilius Sangallensis bis zum St. Galler Professbuch

 
Abb. 3: Das Team der SCRIPTO-DoktorandInnen (die sechs verschiedenen Nationen entstammen und VertreterInnen unterschiedlicher mediävistischer Disziplinen sind) gemeinsam mit Michele Ferrari, Franziska Schnoor und Philipp Lenz (Foto: Jochen Vennebusch).
 
Nach ihrer Ankunft in der Stiftsbibliothek wurden die TeilnehmerInnen am Montag, dem 4. Juli, zunächst von Cornel Dora, dem Stiftsbibliothekar, willkommen geheißen und von Michele Ferrari mit den Schrifttypen der Antike und Spätantike vertraut gemacht (Abb. 3). Die interessante Einführung in die paläographischen Grundlagen blieb sehr weit von einer theoretischen ‚Trocken-Schwimmübung‘ entfernt, denn die Doktoranden bekamen – wie auch an allen darauffolgenden Tagen – von Franziska Schnoor und Philipp Lenz ausgewählte spätantike und mittelalterliche Codices vorgelegt. Als Beispiel für die Capitalis Quadrata etwa – die römische Majuskelschrift, die von den Anfängen der Schriftlichkeit bis ins 6. Jh. nach Chr. geschrieben wurde – bekamen die Teilnehmer den Cod. Sang. 1394, p. 7 gezeigt (Abb. 4). Es handelt sich dabei um den Vergilius Sangallensis, der im 4. oder 5. Jh. n. Chr. entstanden ist und damit zu den ältesten Handschriften der Stiftsbibliothek zählt.
 
Abb. 4: Capitalis Quadrata im Cod. Sang. 1394, p. 7. Bildquelle: http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/csg/1394/7/0/Sequence-748. Zugriff am 13.07.2016 um 16:51 Uhr.


Im Anschluss an die paläographischen Übungen folgte am ersten Nachmittag eine ‚unkonventionelle‘ – und gerade deswegen so wundervolle – Stadtführung von Herrn Dora. Dabei wurden die Teilnehmer gerade nicht durch die Stadt gelotst, sondern auf den Freudenberg, von dem aus sich ein unvergleichliches Panorama auf St. Gallen, das gesamte Umland und den Bodensee ergibt. Nicht verschwiegen werden sollte außerdem, dass sich auf dem Freudenberg das Naturschwimmbad „Drei Weihern“ befindet, das zu den schönsten Freibädern der Schweiz zählt und daher bei den sommerlichen Temperaturen auf die meisten SCRIPTO-Teilnehmer sehr einladend wirkte.


Als wir von unserer Führung zurückkehrten, hatte das Team der Stiftsbibliothek-MitarbeiterInnen uns bereits ein leckeres Abendessen gezaubert und alle TeilnehmerInnen freuten sich darauf, den Tag – der so voll von neuen, spannenden Eindrücken war – bei angeregten Gesprächen, Spaghetti und Abra cadabra-Wein (dem Wein zur aktuellen Ausstellung der Stiftsbibliothek) ausklingen zu lassen.

Auch an den folgenden vier Tagen konnten sich die DoktorandInnen an einem abwechslungsreichen Programm erfreuen. Am Dienstag etwa standen Insulare Handschriften und die verschiedenen Ausformungen der Merowingischen Minuskel (Luxeuil-Schrift, alemannische und rätische Minuskel) im Fokus der Betrachtung. Im Anschluss an die paläographischen Übungen dieses Tages – die gerade im Hinblick auf die Entzifferung der Luxeuil-Schrift ein sehr gutes paläographisches Auge erforderten – durften die Teilnehmer in Filzpantöffelchen schlüpfen und Herrn Dora auf eine Führung durch die Ausstellung Abra cadabra – Medizin im Mittelalter folgen.

Am Mittwoch widmeten sich Herr Ferrari und sein SCRIPTO-Team ganz der Karolingischen Minuskel und den aktuellen wissenschaftlichen Diskussionen, die sich um ihre Entstehung ranken. Bereichert wurde das Programm zudem durch einen öffentlichen Gastvortrag MARILENA MANIACIS (Università degli Studi Cassino Cassino) zu dem Thema Das Buch der Bibel im benediktinischen Mönchtum. Der Fall Montecassino.

Am Donnerstagvormittag wurden die TeilnehmerInnen im Stiftsarchiv in die Urkundenschrift im Frühmittelalter eingeführt und bekamen dabei Kostbarkeiten wie beispielsweise das St. Galler Verbrüderungsbuch (StiASG, C3 B55) oder das Professbuch (StiASG, C3 B56; Abb. 5) gezeigt.
 

Abb. 5: Das St. Galler Professbuch (StiASG, C3 B56, p. 14). Bildquelle: http://www.sg.ch/home/kultur/stiftsarchiv/bestaende/stiftsarchiv_st_gallen/kostbarkeiten/sankt-galler-professbuch.html. Zugriff am 13.07.2016 um 17.43 Uhr.


In diesem Professbuch, das um 800 angelegt wurde, konnten die SCRIPTO-TeilnehmerInnen die Gelübde einsehen, „durch welche sich die St. Galler Mönche vor Gott und den Heiligen auf Lebenszeit zum Verbleiben im Kloster St. Gallen, zum Gehorsam gegenüber dem Abt und zum sittenstrengen Wandel verpflichteten“ (Fn. 2).

Am Nachmittag stand dann die Lehreinheit „Buchbinden im Mittelalter: Geschichte und Praxis“ auf dem Programm, die bei allen DoktorandInnen für große Begeisterung sorgte.
 
Der Freitag stand im Zeichen der gotischen Minuskel, frühhumanistischer Schrifttypen und der Bastarda. Nach den paläographischen Übungen wurde den TeilnehmerInnen zudem ein Einblick darein gewährt, wie die St. Galler Handschriften digitalisiert werden und das e-codices-Projekt sowie das International Digital Research Lab for Medieval Manuscript Fragments „Fragmentarium“ wurden vorgestellt (Fn. 3).
 
Den Abschluss der SCRIPTO-Woche bildete eine Exkursion auf die Klosterinsel Reichenau, wo eine Führung durch das Marienmünster und die Schatzkammer stattfand und die TeilnehmerInnen den Ort besichtigen konnten, an dem der St. Galler Klosterplan (Cod. Sang. 1092) entstanden ist.
 
 

Mit Filzpantöffelchen auf Entdeckungstour: Die Ausstellung Abra cadabra – Medizin im Mittelalter

 
Eines der zahlreichen Highlights der SCRIPTO-Woche war sicherlich der Besuch der aktuellen Sommerausstellung Abra cadabra ‒ Medizin im Mittelalter, die „anhand der e­inmal­igen Handschriftensammlung der St­iftsbi­bli­othek [einen Bogen spannt] von der frühm­ittelalterli­chen Überlieferung mediz­ini­scher Texte des Altertums über das Otmarspi­tal i­m 8., den Spi­talbezirk auf dem Klosterplan ­im 9. und das Wi­rken Notker des Arzts i­m 10. Jahrhundert b­is hi­n zur spätmi­ttelalterli­chen Hei­lprax­is. Si­e zei­gt zudem Be­ispi­ele von Wunderhei­lungen und eri­nnert an d­ie ethi­sche Grundlegung der chri­stli­chen Krankensorge ­in der B­ibel – etwa m­it der Gesch­ichte des barmherzi­gen Samar­iters – und i­n der Benediktsregel“ (Fn. 4) (Abb. 6).
 

Abb. 6: Filzpantöffelchen in Wartestellung (vor dem Eingang zum Barocksaal). (Foto: Jochen Vennebusch).

 

Wenn über 1000 Jahre alte Codices zum ‚Bücherarzt‘ müssen – Dem Restaurator und Buchbinder Martin Strebel über die Schulter geschaut 

 
Am Donnerstag hatten die SCRIPTO-TeilnehmerInnen außerdem die Ehre und das Vergnügen, von Martin Strebel mehr über die zeitliche Einordnung mittelalterlicher Hefttechniken zu lernen. Der Restaurator, der seit vielen Jahren das Atelier Strebel – eine Werkstatt für Konservierung und Restaurierung von Schriftgut und Grafik – in Hunzenschwil (Aargau) leitet, hatte extra für die SCRIPTO-TeilnehmerInnen vier Werkstattvideos gedreht, in denen er die Unterschiede und Eigenheiten der koptischen, karolingischen, romanischen und gotischen Hefttechnik erläuterte. Darüber hinaus begeisterte der engagierte Buchbinder mit eigens angefertigten Modellen der jeweiligen Buchbindetechnik (Abb. 7).
 
Abb. 7: Martin Strebel erklärt den SCRIPTO-TeilnehmerInnen, wie Bucheinbände datiert werden können. (Foto: Stephanie Mühlenfeld).

 
 
So erfuhren die DoktorandInnen etwa über die koptische Hefttechnik, die ihre Anfänge bei den Kopten hat und in der Karolingerzeit, im 8. Jh. endet, dass bei ihr der Buchdeckel entweder mit dem Heftfaden oder mit einem vom Faden der Lagen getrennten Faden befestigt werden kann.
 
Die karolingische Hefttechnik, die vom 8. bis zum 12. Jh. angewandt wurde, wird auch als ‚karolingische Fischgrätheftung‘ bezeichnet. Sie blieb auch in späterer Zeit, als die Bücher zum Teil einen romanischen Einband erhielten, noch über Jahrhunderte hinweg in Gebrauch.
 
Das Charakteristikum romanischer Einbände ist in der Verwendung von Lederbünden zu sehen, die von dem Heftfaden einmal pro Lage oder als Rundbogenheftung umschlungen werden.
 
Auch die gotische Hefttechnik, die sich vom 14. bis ins 17. Jh. erstreckt, ist an ihren Doppelbünden auf Schnur (mit einer Fadenbindung pro Lage) oder der Rundbogenheftung zu erkennen. Neu ist an ihr die veränderte Deckelbefestigung, denn die Bünde werden über die Falzkante im Deckel verankert.
 
Diese Informationen sind enorm wichtig, da sie in der Wissenschaft als Anhaltspunkte für die Datierung mittelalterlicher Codices herangezogen werden können.
 
 
Zusammenfassend lässt sich über meinen St. Gallen-Aufenthalt sagen, dass mir eine unvergesslich tolle Summer School geboten wurde, bei der ich viel Nützliches und Interessantes lernen durfte. Darüber hinaus hat es mich sehr gefreut, mit so vielen lieben Kollegen in angenehmer Atmosphäre diskutieren zu können und neue Kontakte zu knüpfen.
 
Abschließend möchte ich mich ganz herzlich für die Finanzierung meiner SCRIPTO-Teilnahme durch das Graduiertenkolleg 1876 „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ bedanken. 

 
Fußnoten:
[2] Werner Vogler, Kostbarkeiten aus dem Stiftsarchiv St. Gallen in Abbildungen und Texten, St. Gallen 1987, S. 13.[3] Auf e-codices, der virtuellen Handschriftenbibliothek der Schweiz (http://www.e-codices.unifr.ch/de) können zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt 1554 digitalisierte Handschriften aus 67 verschiedenen Sammlungen eingesehen werden. Fragmentarium ist ein Projekt der Universität Fribourg. Für weitere Informationen siehe: http://fragmentarium.ms/contact.html. Zugriff am 14.07.2016 um 11:47 Uhr.
[4] http://www.stibi.ch/Portals/0/Ausstellungen/Medizin_16/Abracadabra_Karte_A5_dt.pdf. Zugriff am 14.07.2016 um 12:24 Uhr. 

Plenumssitzung 30.6.2016: Gastvortrag von Stephan Ebert (TU Darmstadt): „Mensch und Natur in der Historiographie der Karolingerzeit. Umwelthistorische Zugriffe am Beispiel einer Hungerkrise“

Ein Beitrag von Tristan Schmidt.

In der Plenumssitzung am 30.6.2016 besuchte der Mittelalterhistoriker Stephan Ebert (TU Darmstadt) das Graduiertenkolleg und stellte Aspekte seines derzeit laufenden Dissertationsprojekts zu „Weltbild und Identität: Die Rolle von Naturkatastrophen und ihren Deutungsmustern in der mittelalterlichen Wahrnehmung“ (Fn. 1) vor. 
 
Unter dem Titel „Mensch und Natur in der Historiographie der Karolingerzeit. Umwelthistorische Zugriffe am Beispiel einer Hungerkrise“ widmete sich der Beitrag dem Umgang der fränkischen Gesellschaft des Frühmittelalters mit Hungerkrisen. In einem einführenden Teil führte Herr Ebert in moderne Forschungskonzepte zum Thema „Hunger“ ein. Gerade die Begriffe der „Vulnerabilität“ und der „Resilienz“ spielen in diesem Zusammenhang eine wichtige Rolle.



Abb.: Sonnenuntergang. (Quelle: Creative Commons).

Im anschließenden Fallbeispiel ging es um eine Hungersnot, die für das Jahr 779 im fränkischen Reich nachweisbar ist. Die Ergebnisse der Klimaforschung können dabei die zahlreichen Aussagen der erzählenden Quellen zu diesem Ereignis stützen, die von großem Hunger und einer entsprechenden Sterblichkeit berichten. Mit dem sog. Kapitular von Herstal (779) verfügt man über eine Quelle, die über das bloße Konstatieren dieses Ereignisses hinausgeht und Rückschlüsse auf die Bewältigungsstrategien der Gesellschaft zulassen. Bei dem Kapitular handelt es sich um königliche Anweisungen an Laien und Klerus. Man erkennt, dass dem Ereignis auf mehreren Ebenen begegnet werden sollte: So wurden Geistliche wie Laien zu Messen, einem zweitägigen Fasten, Almosen oder einer Notsteuer sowie zur Aufnahme Hilfsbedürftiger aufgefordert.

Dieses Maßnahmenpaket zielte auf eine Art Selbstdisziplinierung zur Besänftigung Gottes und eine intensivere ’spirituelle Kommunikation‘, gleichzeitig aber auch auf praktische Maßnahmen wie Kalorienreduktion durch Fasten und eine Versorgung Hungernder ab. Gleichzeitig stärkte das Ermahnen von Seiten des Herrschers dessen Position in moralischer Hinsicht.
Diese Maßnahmen, die sich sowohl als Reaktionen auf die Hungerkrise als auch als Präventivmaßnahmen gegen eine Wiederholung einer solchen Katastrophe deuten lassen, vereinen somit Praktiken der transzendentalen Kommunikation, der Fürsorge und – schließlich – den Legitimitätsanspruch des Herrschers. Sie sollten die Resilienz der Gesellschaft im Umgang mit derartigen Krisenerscheinungen gewährleisten. 

Fußnote:
[1] Arbeitstitel.


Projektvorstellung „Die Entwicklung einer ‚theoretischen Pharmakologie‘ im 13. Jahrhundert“ – Ein Vortrag von Dr. Iolanda Ventura (CNRS Orléans)

Ein Beitrag von Sarah Prause.

Am Donnerstag, den 7. Juli 2016 durften wir im Rahmen unserer Plenumssitzung Frau Dr. Iolanda Ventura aus Orléans begrüßen. Frau Ventura ist dem Graduiertenkolleg bereits gut bekannt, da sie während des Wintersemesters 2014/2015 als Gastwissenschaftlerin hier tätig war. Während dieser Zeit – und seitdem auch darüber hinaus – stand und steht sie uns Doktoranden stets mit Rat und Tat zur Seite. Und so freuten wir uns umso mehr, sie nun wieder in unserer Runde persönlich begrüßen zu dürfen und etwas über ihr Habilitationsprojekt erfahren zu können.

In ihrem Vortrag be- und unterrichtete Frau Ventura uns über die Entwicklung ihres Projektes zur mittelalterlichen Pharmakologie.
 

Von der „Entwicklung einer theoretischen Pharmakologie“ …

Iolanda Ventura hat sich während ihrer wissenschaftlichen Karriere mit vielen verschiedenen Forschungsrichtungen auseinandergesetzt und unterschiedliche Forschungsinteressen entwickelt. Unter anderem haben verschiedene Handschriften zur mittelalterlichen Pharmazie ihr Interesse geweckt. Mit deren Hilfe möchte Frau Ventura die Phasen der theoretischen Pharmakologie vom 13. bis 14. Jahrhundert erarbeiten. Um diese Phasen aufzeigen zu können, stellte sie zunächst alle ihr zur Verfügung stehenden Texte bzw. Handschriften zusammen und wertete diese aus. Darunter befanden sich sowohl Texte zur mittelalterlichen Pharmazie, die der Forschung bereits bekannt waren, als auch bisher noch wenig bis gar nicht beachtete Texte. Dabei handelt es sich unter anderem um Werke wie Avicennas „Liber canonis“ oder das sogenannte „Corpus des Pseudo-Mesue“ oder die von Ibn Wafid im 11. Jahrhundert verfasste Arzneimittellehre „Pseudo-Serapion“. Es werden aber auch die akademischen Kommentare, die zu einigen medizinischen Schriften verfasst wurden, von Frau Ventura in ihrer Arbeit berücksichtigt.

 … zur „Revolution der Pharmakologie im 13. Jahrhundert“

Während ihrer Beschäftigung mit den verschiedenen Texten stellte Frau Ventura fest, dass die Entwicklung der mittelalterlichen Pharmakologie sehr viel komplexer zu sein scheint als zunächst gedacht. Die Pharmakologie wurde während des 13. Jahrhunderts Teil einer akademischen Debatte, in der die Eigenschaften der Heilmittel, die Natur der Composita (Heilmittel aus mehreren einzeln Wirkstoffen) sowie deren Verwendung heftig diskutiert wurden.

Die untersuchten Texte unterscheiden sich bereits hinsichtlich ihres Niveaus. Es handelt sich dabei nicht nur um Texte für die Praxis, etwa für Apotheker, sondern auch um Texte beispielsweise für Ärzte an Universitäten. Gerade in letzteren könne man beobachten, so Frau Ventura, dass beispielsweise die Wirkung von Pflanzen sehr viel sachlicher und komplizierter erklärt sei als in anderen Texten.

Diese Erkenntnis veranlasste Frau Ventura dazu, die Struktur ihres Forschungsprojektes neu zu überdenken. Nun steht nicht mehr das Aufzeigen einer reinen Entwicklung der mittelalterlichen Pharmakologie im Vordergrund ihres Projekts, sondern die Revolution ebendieser im 13. Jahrhundert.

Darüber hinaus finden sich innerhalb der verschiedenen Texte wichtige Hinweise auf eine Rezeption von Erkenntnissen verschiedener Kulturen untereinander. Dies deutet auf einen bestehenden kulturellen Dialog in Zusammenhang mit der oben aufgezeigten Debatte um Entwicklung und Revolution der mittelalterlichen Pharmakologie hin. Entwicklung und Revolution der Pharmakologie lebt damit vom Austausch der Kulturen.

Frau Ventura hat es sich nun zur Aufgabe gemacht diese Texte nach Inhalt, Übersetzungen, handschriftlicher Überlieferung sowie Fragen und Problemen ihrer Geschichte zu bearbeiten. Ziel der Untersuchung soll sein, herauszufinden, auf welche Weise Pharmakologie schriftliche vermittelt wurde und welche (unterschiedlichen) Beiträge die verschiedenen Texte zu dieser Rezeption leisteten.

Auf die weitere Entwicklung ihres Projektes mit neuen Entdeckungen sowie das Ergebnis dürfen wir weiterhin sehr gespannt sein. Wir wünschen Frau Ventura alles Gute und hoffen, sie bald wieder bei uns begrüßen zu dürfen.

 

Medizin und Tod in der „Alten Welt“ – 36. Treffen des interdisziplinären Arbeitskreises „Alte Medizin“, 2. und 3. Juli 2016 im Institut für Geschichte, Theorie und Ethik der Medizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

Ein Beitrag von Carrie Schidlo.

Am Samstag, den 2. Juli 2016, begrüßten Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening und Prof. Dr. Livia Prüll die Teilnehmer des 36. Treffens des interdisziplinären Arbeitskreises (IAK) „Alte Medizin“ in den Räumlichkeiten des Instituts für Geschichte, Theorie und Ethik der Medizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. Prof. Dr. Prüll führte in die Thematik des IAK ein und berichtete über die Genese des aktuellen Tagungsthemas „Medizin und Tod in der ‚Alten Welt'“, womit das Treffen erstmals unter einem übergeordneten Thema stattfand.

Krankheit, Leiden, Sterben, Selbstmord und Tod

Der Eröffnungsvortrag wurde von PD Dr. Thorsten Fögen (Durham, UK & Wassenaar, Niederlande) gehalten. In „Krankheit und Tod in der frühkaiserzeitlichen römischen Welt“ stellte er zunächst heraus, dass Krankheit, Leiden und Tod im antiken Alltag stets allgegenwärtig waren. Dies stehe im Gegensatz zur Tabuisierung von beispielsweise Selbstmord und Tod im 21. Jahrhundert. Anhand mehrerer Texte unterschiedlicher literarischer Gattungen machte Fögen deutlich, dass selten eine spezifische Krankheit genannt wird. In den Nachrufen auf die Verstorbenen wurde, neben Alter Beruf oder Stand, jedoch häufig auf die Natur des Ablebens eingegangen, d. h. ob ein natürlicher Tod eingetreten ist oder eine Ermordung vorliegt.
 

Ost, West und ein Sprung von 800 Jahren

Nach der Pause richtete sich mit Shahrzad Irannejads (Mainz, GRK 1876) Vortrag „Theorization of Death in Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine“ der Blick auf die Vorstellung des Todes in der arabischen Welt des 10. Jahrhunderts. Irannejad stellte die im ersten Buch von Avicennas „Kanon der Medizin“ aufgeführten Überlegungen zu Gesundheit und Krankheit sowie zur Notwendigkeit des Sterbens vor. Weiterhin ging sie auf eine sehr ausführliche Liste mit Anzeichen für einen baldigen Tod ein.
 
Zurück in das 2. Jahrhundert ging es mit dem Vortrag „Lukian und die totbringenden Wohlstandskrankheiten“ von Frank Ursin (Halle/Saale), mit dem dieser Vortragsabschnitt beschlossen wurde. Ursin führte die medizinischen Beobachtungen in den Werken des Satirikers Lukian vor, in denen dieser verschiedene Krankheiten, wie beispielsweise Gicht, mit dem Luxus an Speiseauswahl und -menge in Verbindung brachte.
 

Von standesgemäßem Sterben und magisch-rituellem Heilen

Die nächste Sektion, von Dr. med. Madeleine Mai (Mainz) moderiert, wurde von Stefan E. A. Wagner (Catania, Italien) eröffnet. Sein Vortrag „Der Tod eines Handel Treibenden: Das Eurysaces-Grabmal an der Porta Maggiore in Rom und die Hierarchisierung des Sterbens im Römischen Reich“ beschäftigte sich mit den unterschiedlichen Formen der Grabmalgestaltung anhand des sozialen Standes der Verstorbenen.
 
Dr. med. Dr. Waltraud Wamser-Krasznais (Butzbach) Vortrag „Mythos, Magie und Metamorphosen. Schlaglichter auf Arzt und Tod in der Alten Welt“ beleuchtete einen weit gefassten Begriff des Arztes in der Antike. Hiernach zählen nicht nur die menschlichen Ärzte dazu, sondern auch Heilheroen und Heilgötter. Der Begriff des Todes wurde ebenfalls breit erfasst, u. a. als Metamorphose, Wiedergeburt oder auch Vergöttlichung. Mit diesem Vortrag wurde der erste Tag des 36. Treffens beschlossen.
 

Beschreibungen von Erkrankungen: Konzeption und Rezeption

Am Sonntagmorgen begrüßte Prof. Dr. Klaus-Dietrich Fischer (Mainz) die Teilnehmer zur ersten Sektion des Tages. Der erste Vortragende, PD Dr. med. Mathias Witt (München), sprach in seinem Vortrag über „Die Nerven-Sympathie (νευρικὴ συμπάθεια) – ein antikes Konzept der Krankheitsfortleitung und -ausbreitung“.
 
Anschließend beschäftigte sich Dr. Nadine Metzger (Erlangen-Nürnberg) in „‚Denn Hippokrates war Naturwissenschaftler!‘ Zur modernen Rezeption der Epilepsie-Schrift De Morbo Sacro“ mit den verschiedenen Auslegungen dieser Schrift, u. a. als Erstbeschreibung eines großen epileptischen Anfalls.

Darstellung von Krankheiten und Entwicklung einer Therapieform

In den zweiten Abschnitt des Tages wurde von Dr. med. Madeleine Mai eingeleitet. In ihrem Vortrag „Blindheit in der griechischen Kunst des 8. bis 4. Jh. v. Chr. Aspekte der Heilung: Zwischen göttlichem Willen und medizinischer Therapie“ gab Sarah Prause (Mainz, GRK 1876) Einblicke in ihr laufendes Dissertationsprojekt.
 
Im Anschluss daran verlagerte sich der Fokus wieder nach Osten. Vivien Shaw (Oxford) stellte in „Was Acupuncture developed by Han Dynasty Chinese Anatomists?“ ihre Beobachtungen vor, welche sie im Joint-Project mit Dr. Amy K. McLennan (Oxford) gemacht hatte. Entgegen der Annahme, dass in China kaum Sektionen an Leichnamen durchgeführt wurden, postulieren Shaw und McLennan, dass auch für die Ermittlung der Akupunkturpunkte Leichen herangezogen wurden.
 

Papyri und Wissen aus Ägypten

Die Abschlusssektion, die von Prof. Dr. Tanja Pommerening (Mainz) geleitet wurde, eröffnete Anna Monte (Berlin). Sie stellte in „Medizinische Rezeptsammlungen auf Papyrus aus der Berliner Papyrussammlung“ drei griechische, medizinische Papyri aus Ägypten vor, die Teil ihres Dissertationsprojekts sind.

Dr. Lutz Popko (Leipzig) beschloss die Tagung mit der Präsentation „Die Website ‚Science in Ancient Egypt‘ – ein Portal zu altägyptischen medizinischen Texten“. Er stellte damit die aktualisierte Version vor, in der momentan überwiegend die heilkundlichen Texte erfasst werden. Bis 2032 werden die bekannten Texte magischen, mathematischen, kalendarischen, astrologisch-astronomischen, mantischen, divinatorischen sowie geographischen, botanischen, chemischen und onomastischen Inhalts wie auch Lexika und Priesterhandbücher eingepflegt.

Forschungsaufenthalt an der Abteilung Istanbul des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts (DAI)

Ein Beitrag von Florian Schimpf.

Das Graduiertenkollleg 1876 „Frühe Konzepte von Mensch und Natur“ bietet allen Promovendinnen und Promovenden die Möglichkeit, bei Bedarf bis zu vier Wochen an einer ausländischen Forschungseinrichtung zu forschen. Nach Sarah Prause (Blogbeitrag Athen: Forschungsaufenthalt 23.05.2015 bis 18.06.2015) nahm nun auch Florian Schimpf dieses Angebot wahr und verbrachte einen vierwöchigen Forschungsaufenthalt an der Abteilung Istanbul des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts (DAI). 

Wenngleich die Abteilung Istanbul des DAI nicht zu den offiziellen Kooperationspartnern des GRKs zählt, besteht doch seit nunmehr drei Jahren ein reger und fruchtbarer Austausch zwischen den beiden Einrichtungen: Im Frühjahr 2014 rief die Abteilung das Wissenschaftliche Netzwerk „Natur und Kult in Anatolien“ ins Leben, mit dem der Austausch zwischen der Abteilung und Forschungseinrichtungen wie dem GRK gefördert wird und an dem das GRK durch Florian Schimpf von Beginn an vertreten ist (Blogbeitrag 1. Netzwerktreffen „Natur und Kult in Anatolien“ am Deutschen Archäologischen Institut (DAI) in Istanbul).

Obendrein besitzt die Abteilung mit über 65.000 Bänden und 200 laufenden Zeitschriften die am besten ausgestattete Fachbibliothek zu den Kulturen auf dem Gebiet der heutigen Türkei und beherbergt mit über 97.000 archivierten Bildträgern eine herausragende bildliche Dokumentation der hiesigen Denkmäler. Die Aussicht, diese einzigartigen Bestände, darunter türkische Zeitschriften und Reihen, die von anderen deutschen Forschungseinrichtungen in der Regel nicht bzw. nicht laufend bezogen werden, sichten zu können erklärt, warum es Herrn Schimpf gen Istanbul zog. Die Wahl des Zeitpunktes indes hängt mit einem Großereignis zusammen, das traditionell im Frühsommer Archäologen aus aller Welt in der Türkei versammelt.

In die Zeit des Aufenthalts fiel nämlich die diesjährige Grabungsleiterkonferenz, die Kazı Sonuçlar Toplantısı. Alljährlich werden auf dieser einwöchigen Konferenz die Grabungsergebnisse des Vorjahres referiert und diskutiert. In diesem Jahr fand die Veranstaltung in den Räumlichkeiten der Trakya Üniversitesi in Edirne unweit der türkisch-griechisch-bulgarischen Grenze statt. Da einige dissertationsrelevante Kultstätten erst in jüngster Zeit entdeckt und untersucht wurden, bot die Konferenz interessante Einblicke in aktuelle Forschungen und stellte eine Bereicherung eines ohnehin ertragreichen Forschungsaufenthalts dar.

Feurige Vulkane und erfrischende Quellen – Plenumssitzung am 23. Juni 2016

Ein Beitrag von Dominic Bärsch.

In der Plenumssitzung am 23. Juni 2016 stellten Katharina Hillenbrand und Florian Schimpf Aspekte ihrer Dissertationen vor. Beide beschäftigten sich mit der Wahrnehmung konkreter Natur, einmal der Wahrnehmung und Deutung von vulkanischen Phänomenen in der griechisch-römischen Antike, einmal mit der sakralisierter Natur. 

Die Feuerflüsse der Ober- und Unterwelt

Zunächst widmete sich Katharina Hillenbrand in ihrem Vortrag „Jedem seinen Platz? Vulkanische Phänomene und Unterweltsvorstellungen der griechisch-römischen Antike“ der Perzeption vulkanischer Phänomene in der griechisch-römischen Literatur. Davon griff sie besonders zwei näher heraus, denen in der Antike besondere Bedeutung zugeschrieben wurden: Den Krater und die Lava.

In Anlehnung an die These Peter Kingsleys (Fn. 1) zeigte sie zunächst anhand mehrerer Beispiele, inwieweit beide Phänomene speziell in Unterweltsvorstellungen sizilianischer Provenienz repräsentiert werden. Der Schlund würde dabei im Bild kesselartiger Gefäße in verschiedenen Mythenvarianten verbildlicht, der Lavastrom besonders durch Feuerströme wie den Pyriphlegethon in der Unterwelt. Nach Kingsley haben beide Bilder ihren Ursprung in sizilianischen und süditalischen pythagoreischen Unterweltsvorstellungen, die letztlich maßgeblich antike Unterweltsvorstellungen mitprägten und dieser Unterwelt vulkanische Färbung gaben. Nach dieser Tradition seien vulkanische Schlünde besonders als Eingänge zur Unterwelt und als Orte voller matschiger Feuerströme gedacht, die von Süditalien bis Sizilien – und damit mit zwei großen Zentren pythagoreischer Schulen – unterirdisch miteinander verbunden seien. 

Von Kingsleys Beobachtungen ausgehend zeigte Katharina Hillenbrand in früheren und späteren mythischen Darstellungen weitere vergleichbare Bilder für Krater und Lavaströme. Das Bild des kesselartigen Gefäßes wies dabei oft eine besondere Nähe zu Hephaistos auf, während der Lavastrom meist mit seinem Ursprung in der Unterwelt korreliert wurde. Den Abschluss bildeten Überlegungen, inwieweit sich diese Motive auch in der Legende der pii fratres spiegelten. Dem Vortrag folgte eine angeregte Diskussion. 

Ritueller Raum und Erinnerung

Florian Schimpf stellte seinen Vortrag „Erinnerungsorte, Agency, konstruierte Räume: Konzepte von Natur und Kult in der griechischen Antike“ unter die Leitfrage, warum bestimmte Naturmale und Naturräume ideell aufgeladen wurden, um damit die zugrunde liegenden Konzepten von Natur und Kult ausmachen zu können. Damit setzte er die Gedanken seines letzten Vortrages vor dem Plenum fort, indem er vor allem über die Fragen gesprochen hatte, wie mit natürlichen Elementen in sakralen Kontexten umgegangen worden ist und wie diese in den rituellen Raum eingebunden worden sind.

Anhand zahlreicher Beispiele aus dem Kleinasiatischen Raum sowie literarischer Beschreibungen von loci amoeni formulierte Florian Schimpf die Ergebnisse, dass natürliche Elemente integrale Bestandteile in einem Heiligtum gewesen sein, jedoch das Heiligtum auch selbst oder kumulativ eine sakrale Naturlandschaft gebildet haben können. Diese natürlichen Elemente besaßen mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit, besonders in extraurbanen Heiligtümern, eine erinnerungsstiftende Funktion, sind also als Erinnerungsmale konzipiert worden. Auch an die Thesen dieses Vortrages entfachte sich eine lebhafte Diskussion.

Fußnote:
[1] KINGSLEY, P., Ancient Philosophy, Mystery, and Magic. Empedocles and Pythagorean Tradition, Oxford 1995.

Neuste Forschungen zur Interaktion von Zeit und Raum im alten Ägypten

Ein Beitrag von Simone Gerhards.

Vom 9. bis 11. Juni 2016 fand an der Université catholique de Louvain (Belgien) die internationale Konferenz „Temps et espace en Egypte ancienne – Time and Space in Ancient Egypt“ statt. Die Organisatoren Prof. Claude Obsomer, Prof. Jean Winand und Gaëlle Chantrain boten ein reiches Spektrum an Vorträgen und Posterpräsentationen aus den Bereichen Linguistik, Philologie, Ikonographie und Religion. Diese dienten zum einem dazu, den aktuellen Stand der Dinge zum Thema „Zeit und Raum“ wiederzugeben und zum anderen, neue und spannende Forschungsfragen zu diskutieren. Darunter befand sich auch das Poster über „Time and Space for sleeping“ der Kollegiatin Simone Gerhards (und Autorin dieses Blogbeitrags). Der Fokus des Posters lag auf den Fragen, wann und wo geschlafen wurde. Auf Grundlage einer lexikologischen Auswertung von sechs ägyptischen Lexemen gaben Infografiken Aufschluss über die semantischen Verbindungen dieser Wörter zu bestimmten Orten und Zeiten. Interessant ist, dass nicht nur Angaben zu Schlafenszeiten und Schlafplätzen in schriftlichen Quellen existieren, sondern auch der Zeitpunkt des Schlafens selbst als Zeitreferenz dienen kann.

Abb. 1: Poster „Time and space for sleeping“ von Simone Gerhards.
 

Zeit und Raum: abstrakte Konzepte und Alltagsempfinden

Um einen generellen Überblick über den aktuellen Forschungsstand zu geben, begannen Jean Winand und Gaelle Chantrain mit einer Einleitung zur Frage, was überhaupt als Zeit und Raum empfunden werde. Dabei wurden auch die unterschiedlichen Arten von kulturspezifischer „Zeit“ angesprochen, die auch während der Konferenz immer wieder eine Rolle spielten: Zeit als lineare Größe, Zeit als zyklische Größe sowie Zeit eine Mischform aus beiden. Darüber hinaus bilden zwei Ebenen – Zeit als Ideologie (um z. B. Macht auszudrücken) und Zeit als Alltagswert (um z. B Verabredungen zu treffen), die Hauptachsen des Zeitempfindens. In den ägyptischen Erzählungen haben Zeit- und Raumerwähnungen beispielsweise oft die übergeordnete Aufgabe, die Geschichte inhaltlich zu strukturieren und dadurch Nähe oder Distanz zu einer Person oder einem Ort auszudrücken. Jean-Marie widmete sich bspw. semiotischen Überlegungen zum Raum-Zeit-Konzept. Er beschrieb Raum als eine Art abstraktes Konzept. Dabei spielen Farben, Formen oder die Textur des Raumes eine Rolle, aber auch Informationen, ob eine Tür offen oder geschlossen ist, könnten Empfindungen wie Freude oder Angst auslösen.

Zeit und Raum: Macht, Metapher und Materialisierung

Renata Langráfovás Vortrag eröffnete die erste Session des Tages. Sie berichtete von den Inschriften, die in der Grabkammer des Priesters Iuafaa in Abusir gefunden wurden und die weit über die „gewöhnlichen“ Grabinschriften hinausgehen. Die Texte enthalten Rituale und Wissen über Aktivitäten, die Macht auf Erden sichern sollen. Für alle diese Aktivitäten sind bestimmte Zeit- und Ortsabgaben genannt, die nur in Verbindung mit ihrem jeweiligen Anbringungsort im Grab zu verstehen sind. Der anschließende Vortrag von Camilla Di-Biase-Dyson gab Einblicke in das spannende Gebiet der kognitiven Metapherntheorien. In Bezug auf die medizinischen Texte des alten Ägyptens eröffnet sich ein Forschungsfeld, das bisher noch wenig Beachtung gefunden hat. Maya Müller richtete in ihrem Beitrag den Blick auf den ikonographischen Bereich. Ihr Fokus lag dabei auf den technischen Darstellungstechniken von Raum und Zeit sowie deren Wandel im Laufe der ägyptischen geschichte. Der folgende Vortrag von Alicia Maravelia über „Of eternity, everlastingness & stars: notions of duration, time, spacce & the firmament in the Pyramide & Coffin Texts“ drehte sich vorwiegend um die zuvor erwähnten linearen vs. zyklischen Zeitempfindungen und deren kosmische Repräsentation.

Zeit und Raum: Grenzen und Konstruktionen

Die dritte Session wurde von Christian Langer eröffnet, der über Ähnlichkeiten zwischen dem Konzept der „Grenze“ im Neuen Reich und dem Konzept der „Grenze“ im modernen Europa in Bezug auf militärische Legitimationen sprach. Woijciech Ejsmond stellte in seinem Vortrag über „Construction of Sacred Space in Predynastic and Early Dynastic Period“ die Frage, nach welchen Gesichtspunkten heilige Orte für z. B. den Tempelbau ausgewählt wurden. Seiner Meinung nach, sind vorwiegend drei Punkte anzuführen: eine Verbindung zum Kosmos, eine Anspielung auf die Schöpfung und das generelle Mysterium („mystery“) des Ortes; letztgenannter Punkt wurde in der anschließenden Diskussion ausführlich erörtert. Den Abschluss des ersten Tages bildete der Festvortrag von Claude Obsomer über die Schlacht von Qadesch: „la bataille de Qadech: n’arin, sekou tepy et questions d’intinéraires“.

Zeit und Raum: Werkzeug zur Legitimation und Propaganda

Der zweite Tag begann mit der vierten Session zur Wahrnehmung von Zeit und Raum in schriftlichen Quellen. André Patricio startete mit einem Vortrag über „The manipulation of linear time and the importance of mythological time. A tool for legitimacy of pharaohs in Ancient Egypt“, in dem er über die Bedeutung von Linearität in ägyptischen Königslisten sprach. Anschließend berichtete Laura Parys in „La conception du temps dans le conte du Papyrus Westcar“, dass die jeweilige Verwendung einer der drei Zeitstufen Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft in der Erzählung des Papyrus Westcar der königlichen Legitimation der 5. Dynastie gedient haben könnte. 

Zeit und Raum: Der linguistische Blick 

Die fünfte Session war ganz der linguistischen Sichtweise auf Zeit und Raum gewidmet. Zunächst stellte Maxim Kupreyev in seinem Vortrag über „Modelling time as space in the interrogative patters of Late Egyptian: pro et contra“ zum Erstaunen der meisten Zuhörer fest, dass es im ägyptischen Vokabular kein direktes sprachliches Pendant zur Frage „Wann“ (um den Zeitpunkt eines Ereignisses auszudrücken) gibt. Elise-Sophia Lincke richtete danach in ihrer Präsentation den Fokus auf das Koptische und dessen verbale Ausdrucksweisen für die Deixis (Bezugspunkt auf Personen, Zeit und Raum im Kontext). Dies erläuterte sie am Beispiel der koptischen Verben für „kommen“ und „gehen“.

Zeit und Raum: real, fiktiv und unterweltlich 

Die sechste Session wurde von Anthony Spalinger begonnen, der seine neuesten Ideen in Bezug auf die genannten Namen der Monatstage in Medinet Habu präsentierte. Nikolas Lazaridis diskutierte die Erwähnungen von Privatsphäre in den ägyptischen Erzählungen, wobei er unter anderem das Schlafen und das Schlafzimmer als einen derartigen „privaten Raum“ ausmachen konnte. Erstmals dem Demotischen widmete sich Lawrence Xu-Nan in seinem Vortrag über „While all these happenned – The use of introducery phrases as indicators fort he movement of time and space in Demotic narrative“, der die Einleitungsphrasen in demotischen Erzählungen in Bezug auf deren Funktion und Zeitbezug analysierte. Daniel Werning referierte anschließend in der siebten Session über die sequenziellen Zeit- und Raumrepräsentationen in den Unterweltsbüchern des Neuen Reichs. Erneut der Frage nach linearem und zyklischem Zeitempfinden stellte Christian Cannuyer, der die ägyptischen Begriffe ḏ.t bzw. nḥḥ und ihre koptischen Entsprechungen diskutierte. In der achten Session sprach Renata Schiavo über die räumliche und zeitliche Verbindung von Lebenden und Toten in der Unterwelt. Den zweiten Tag beendete Benoît Lursons Präsentation über „Espace de la représentation et temps de sa perception. Le temple égyptien du Novel Empire: un champ d’étude pour la sémiotique cognitive“.

Zeit und Raum: von Worten zu Taten

Auch am letzten Tag wurde noch einmal ein breites Spektrum an Themen abdeckt. So waren weitere Vorträge zu deiktischen Wörtern in Bezug auf Zeit und Raum von Mohsen El-Toukhy und Daniel Potter im Programm verankert. Des Weiteren berichteten Marianne Michel über die Zeit und Raumwahrnehmungen während des ersten Feldzugs von Thutmosis III oder auch Anette Schomberg über die Zeitmessung in Form von Wasseruhren (auch Klepsydra genannt).

Insgesamt bot die Konferenz interessante Vorträge, die zum mit- und nachdenken angeregt und das Themengebiet Zeit und Raum im alten Ägypten aus den unterschiedlichsten Blickwinkeln beleuchtet haben.

Neuste Forschungen zur Interaktion von Zeit und Raum im alten Ägypten

Ein Beitrag von Simone Gerhards.

Vom 9. bis 11. Juni 2016 fand an der Université catholique de Louvain (Belgien) die internationale Konferenz „Temps et espace en Egypte ancienne – Time and Space in Ancient Egypt“ statt. Die Organisatoren Prof. Claude Obsomer, Prof. Jean Winand und Gaëlle Chantrain boten ein reiches Spektrum an Vorträgen und Posterpräsentationen aus den Bereichen Linguistik, Philologie, Ikonographie und Religion. Diese dienten zum einem dazu, den aktuellen Stand der Dinge zum Thema „Zeit und Raum“ wiederzugeben und zum anderen, neue und spannende Forschungsfragen zu diskutieren. Darunter befand sich auch das Poster über „Time and Space for sleeping“ der Kollegiatin Simone Gerhards (und Autorin dieses Blogbeitrags). Der Fokus des Posters lag auf den Fragen, wann und wo geschlafen wurde. Auf Grundlage einer lexikologischen Auswertung von sechs ägyptischen Lexemen gaben Infografiken Aufschluss über die semantischen Verbindungen dieser Wörter zu bestimmten Orten und Zeiten. Interessant ist, dass nicht nur Angaben zu Schlafenszeiten und Schlafplätzen in schriftlichen Quellen existieren, sondern auch der Zeitpunkt des Schlafens selbst als Zeitreferenz dienen kann.

Abb. 1: Poster „Time and space for sleeping“ von Simone Gerhards.
 

Zeit und Raum: abstrakte Konzepte und Alltagsempfinden

Um einen generellen Überblick über den aktuellen Forschungsstand zu geben, begannen Jean Winand und Gaelle Chantrain mit einer Einleitung zur Frage, was überhaupt als Zeit und Raum empfunden werde. Dabei wurden auch die unterschiedlichen Arten von kulturspezifischer „Zeit“ angesprochen, die auch während der Konferenz immer wieder eine Rolle spielten: Zeit als lineare Größe, Zeit als zyklische Größe sowie Zeit eine Mischform aus beiden. Darüber hinaus bilden zwei Ebenen – Zeit als Ideologie (um z. B. Macht auszudrücken) und Zeit als Alltagswert (um z. B Verabredungen zu treffen), die Hauptachsen des Zeitempfindens. In den ägyptischen Erzählungen haben Zeit- und Raumerwähnungen beispielsweise oft die übergeordnete Aufgabe, die Geschichte inhaltlich zu strukturieren und dadurch Nähe oder Distanz zu einer Person oder einem Ort auszudrücken. Jean-Marie widmete sich bspw. semiotischen Überlegungen zum Raum-Zeit-Konzept. Er beschrieb Raum als eine Art abstraktes Konzept. Dabei spielen Farben, Formen oder die Textur des Raumes eine Rolle, aber auch Informationen, ob eine Tür offen oder geschlossen ist, könnten Empfindungen wie Freude oder Angst auslösen.

Zeit und Raum: Macht, Metapher und Materialisierung

Renata Langráfovás Vortrag eröffnete die erste Session des Tages. Sie berichtete von den Inschriften, die in der Grabkammer des Priesters Iuafaa in Abusir gefunden wurden und die weit über die „gewöhnlichen“ Grabinschriften hinausgehen. Die Texte enthalten Rituale und Wissen über Aktivitäten, die Macht auf Erden sichern sollen. Für alle diese Aktivitäten sind bestimmte Zeit- und Ortsabgaben genannt, die nur in Verbindung mit ihrem jeweiligen Anbringungsort im Grab zu verstehen sind. Der anschließende Vortrag von Camilla Di-Biase-Dyson gab Einblicke in das spannende Gebiet der kognitiven Metapherntheorien. In Bezug auf die medizinischen Texte des alten Ägyptens eröffnet sich ein Forschungsfeld, das bisher noch wenig Beachtung gefunden hat. Maya Müller richtete in ihrem Beitrag den Blick auf den ikonographischen Bereich. Ihr Fokus lag dabei auf den technischen Darstellungstechniken von Raum und Zeit sowie deren Wandel im Laufe der ägyptischen geschichte. Der folgende Vortrag von Alicia Maravelia über „Of eternity, everlastingness & stars: notions of duration, time, spacce & the firmament in the Pyramide & Coffin Texts“ drehte sich vorwiegend um die zuvor erwähnten linearen vs. zyklischen Zeitempfindungen und deren kosmische Repräsentation.

Zeit und Raum: Grenzen und Konstruktionen

Die dritte Session wurde von Christian Langer eröffnet, der über Ähnlichkeiten zwischen dem Konzept der „Grenze“ im Neuen Reich und dem Konzept der „Grenze“ im modernen Europa in Bezug auf militärische Legitimationen sprach. Woijciech Ejsmond stellte in seinem Vortrag über „Construction of Sacred Space in Predynastic and Early Dynastic Period“ die Frage, nach welchen Gesichtspunkten heilige Orte für z. B. den Tempelbau ausgewählt wurden. Seiner Meinung nach, sind vorwiegend drei Punkte anzuführen: eine Verbindung zum Kosmos, eine Anspielung auf die Schöpfung und das generelle Mysterium („mystery“) des Ortes; letztgenannter Punkt wurde in der anschließenden Diskussion ausführlich erörtert. Den Abschluss des ersten Tages bildete der Festvortrag von Claude Obsomer über die Schlacht von Qadesch: „la bataille de Qadech: n’arin, sekou tepy et questions d’intinéraires“.

Zeit und Raum: Werkzeug zur Legitimation und Propaganda

Der zweite Tag begann mit der vierten Session zur Wahrnehmung von Zeit und Raum in schriftlichen Quellen. André Patricio startete mit einem Vortrag über „The manipulation of linear time and the importance of mythological time. A tool for legitimacy of pharaohs in Ancient Egypt“, in dem er über die Bedeutung von Linearität in ägyptischen Königslisten sprach. Anschließend berichtete Laura Parys in „La conception du temps dans le conte du Papyrus Westcar“, dass die jeweilige Verwendung einer der drei Zeitstufen Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft in der Erzählung des Papyrus Westcar der königlichen Legitimation der 5. Dynastie gedient haben könnte. 

Zeit und Raum: Der linguistische Blick 

Die fünfte Session war ganz der linguistischen Sichtweise auf Zeit und Raum gewidmet. Zunächst stellte Maxim Kupreyev in seinem Vortrag über „Modelling time as space in the interrogative patters of Late Egyptian: pro et contra“ zum Erstaunen der meisten Zuhörer fest, dass es im ägyptischen Vokabular kein direktes sprachliches Pendant zur Frage „Wann“ (um den Zeitpunkt eines Ereignisses auszudrücken) gibt. Elise-Sophia Lincke richtete danach in ihrer Präsentation den Fokus auf das Koptische und dessen verbale Ausdrucksweisen für die Deixis (Bezugspunkt auf Personen, Zeit und Raum im Kontext). Dies erläuterte sie am Beispiel der koptischen Verben für „kommen“ und „gehen“.

Zeit und Raum: real, fiktiv und unterweltlich 

Die sechste Session wurde von Anthony Spalinger begonnen, der seine neuesten Ideen in Bezug auf die genannten Namen der Monatstage in Medinet Habu präsentierte. Nikolas Lazaridis diskutierte die Erwähnungen von Privatsphäre in den ägyptischen Erzählungen, wobei er unter anderem das Schlafen und das Schlafzimmer als einen derartigen „privaten Raum“ ausmachen konnte. Erstmals dem Demotischen widmete sich Lawrence Xu-Nan in seinem Vortrag über „While all these happenned – The use of introducery phrases as indicators fort he movement of time and space in Demotic narrative“, der die Einleitungsphrasen in demotischen Erzählungen in Bezug auf deren Funktion und Zeitbezug analysierte. Daniel Werning referierte anschließend in der siebten Session über die sequenziellen Zeit- und Raumrepräsentationen in den Unterweltsbüchern des Neuen Reichs. Erneut der Frage nach linearem und zyklischem Zeitempfinden stellte Christian Cannuyer, der die ägyptischen Begriffe ḏ.t bzw. nḥḥ und ihre koptischen Entsprechungen diskutierte. In der achten Session sprach Renata Schiavo über die räumliche und zeitliche Verbindung von Lebenden und Toten in der Unterwelt. Den zweiten Tag beendete Benoît Lursons Präsentation über „Espace de la représentation et temps de sa perception. Le temple égyptien du Novel Empire: un champ d’étude pour la sémiotique cognitive“.

Zeit und Raum: von Worten zu Taten

Auch am letzten Tag wurde noch einmal ein breites Spektrum an Themen abdeckt. So waren weitere Vorträge zu deiktischen Wörtern in Bezug auf Zeit und Raum von Mohsen El-Toukhy und Daniel Potter im Programm verankert. Des Weiteren berichteten Marianne Michel über die Zeit und Raumwahrnehmungen während des ersten Feldzugs von Thutmosis III oder auch Anette Schomberg über die Zeitmessung in Form von Wasseruhren (auch Klepsydra genannt).

Insgesamt bot die Konferenz interessante Vorträge, die zum mit- und nachdenken angeregt und das Themengebiet Zeit und Raum im alten Ägypten aus den unterschiedlichsten Blickwinkeln beleuchtet haben.